Zombieland: Double Tap Movie Poster

Trivia for Zombieland: Double Tap

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  • Was released as a celebration for the tenth anniversary of Zombieland (2009).
  • The film's script was completed in late 2017.
  • As of 2015, all four leads in this film have been nominated for Academy Awards for their performances in other films. In 2017, Emma Stone became the first to win an Oscar, for La La Land (2016).
  • On January 29, 2019, Sony Pictures posted a photo of the film's poster along with the Zombieland (2009) poster for the "ten year challenge".
  • Rumored titles for the film included Zombieland 2, Zombieworld, and Zombieland: Double Tap. On January 29, 2019, the film was confirmed to be titled the latter, which is a reference to rule #2 in Zombieland (2009).
  • This will be the third movie Woody Harrelson has worked on with director Ruben Fleischer. The previous two were Zombieland (2009) and Venom (2018).
  • This was filmed in Panavision (anamorphic) with ARRI Alexa cameras, unlike its predecessor which was filmed spherically with Panavision Genesis cameras in the Super 35 format.
  • In Babylon, Columbus and the others sit around a table made of an Interstate 185 sign. Located in southwest Georgia, I-185 is an offshoot of I-85 connecting Columbus, GA with the Interstate Highway System. I-85 runs from just outside of Richmond, VA to Montgomery, AL. I-185 does not, however run from Columbus to Atlanta.
  • The scene in which Columbus stands on top of an RV, directing Tallahassee and Wichita to which direction the zombies are coming from, came from the final battle in an early draft of Zombieland (2009) which involved Columbus and Tallahassee doing the same thing at an abandoned gas station.
  • Jesse Eisenberg said that it was very difficult to keep a straight face while filming scenes with Zoey Deutch.
  • This is the fourth film that Jesse Eisenberg and Woody Harrelson have together. The previous three were Zombieland (2009), Now You See Me (2013), Now You See Me 2 (2016).
  • Ryan Reynolds was considered for the role of Albuquerque, but had to turn it down due to scheduling conflicts.
  • In the motel, Columbus, Wichita and Flagstaff are playing Magic the Gathering.
  • This is the second time Rosario Dawson and Woody Harrelson have worked together. The previous film being Seven Pounds (2008).
  • The song "Master of Puppets" by Metallica plays during the opening credits. Not only does this mirror the first movie which played "For Whom the Bell Tolls" by Metallica during its opening credits, but the creators of Zombieland (2009) had originally tried using "Master of Puppets" in the first film but could not afford the rights to it. Director Ruben Fleischer said that if Zombieland 2 ever got green-lit, the very first song he'd buy the rights to would be "Master Of Puppets" to ensure the song could appear in the sequel.
  • Tallahassee at one point signs a presidential pardon for Wesley Snipes, who was convicted by tax evasion in 2010; Woody Harrelson and he co-starred in White Men Can't Jump (1992), Money Train (1995) and Wildcats (1986).
  • The list of double, triple, quadruple taps, and so on makes a joke about whatever the nine-uple word would be. The word is "nonuple."
  • Despite the fact that Abigail Breslin is one of four main stars of the film (and is listed as such on the poster), she is credited after the main title of the film. Her co-stars Woody Harrelson, Jesse Eisenberg and Emma Stone are credited before the main title.
  • The idea for an enterprise Madison speaks about is an obvious reference to Uber. Founded in 2009, it did not exist in the "Zombieland" universe, since the zombie apocalypse started exactly in 2009.
  • One of the safe havens in the film is called Babylon. Emma Stone is set to star in Babylon (2021).
  • Columbus mentions that Madison is almost as pretty as 406. In the previous Zombieland (2009) movie, Columbus lived in apartment 408, and 406 was his pretty neighbor lady, who turned into a zombie and tried to eat him.
  • When Tallahassee prepares to depart, Columbus expresses his hope to hear a better goodbye than the "pig" he used last time. In Zombieland (2009), Tallahassee tried saying goodbye by quoting "That'll do, pig" from Babe (1995), which Columbus called "the worst goodbye I've ever heard".
  • When Columbus and Flagstaff are comparing their respective 'rules/commandments to survive Zombieland', they find that they both have one for keeping important stuff dry. Columbus' rule is "#22: Ziploc bags". This rule was featured in a deleted scene from Zombieland (2009), where Columbus explained that "you've got enough problems; moisture shouldn't be one of them".
  • Director Ruben Fleischer said that he was inspired to make Zombieland (2009) after seeing Shaun of the Dead (2004). The scene in Zombieland: Double Tap where Columbus and Tallahassee meet their 'counterparts' Albuquerque and Flagstaff may have been inspired by a scene in Shaun of the Dead, where Shaun's group of zombie apocalypse survivors meets another group that consists of remarkably similar characters.
  • The most simple-minded zombies are nicknamed 'Homers' in the beginning, an obvious nod to the similarly oafish Homer Simpson. Not only is the word 'Homer' on screen spelled in the same font as used by the series ("Simpsonfont"); the letter O is replaced by a donut, Homer Simpson's favorite snack. Woody Harrelson guest starred on the show in Fear of Flying (1994).
  • In the White House, Barack Obama's "Hope" poster is on a mantel, and a poster for Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan (2006) is to the left of it.
  • The story that Tallahassee tells in the hotel about his Elvis impersonation is the true story of how Woody Harrelson got into acting.
  • Madison's love of everything pink may be a nod to Pretty in Pink (1986), which was directed by Zoey Deutch's (Madison) father, Howard Deutch.
  • In the beginning of the film, in one scene Columbus and Tallahassee are standing in front of a vacant parking lot of a shopping mall. This is most likely an homage to George A. Romero's Dawn of the Dead (1978) and its subsequent remake in 2004.
  • According to Tony Gardner, the film looked like a lot of fun from the start. The script was similar to the original, " it was definitely one of those laugh out loud kind of reads" The dialogue is sprinkled with what are sure to be new catchphrases, and the film delivers on bizarro doppelgängers, and an explosive finale.
  • In order to simultaneously handle the different groups of zombies as the filmmakers tried to stay ahead of the moving sunlight, Gardner broke his makeup crew into several small teams. There were groups of zombies interacting with the lead actors, as well as the "second" and "splinter" units. Tony says that it was a schizophrenic way to start a movie but that it was, " really good 'cause it kinda set the tone."
  • The zombie designs created for the original film were drawn from real life. References used included actual diseases such as hoof-and-mouth and skin conditions like bed sores. "There had to be a genuine horror to the experience," said Tony. These afflictions reflected an infected, decaying situation where the skin and tissue appeared to be melting and leaking. The zombie wounds would be abscessed, leaking puss with white and yellow colors mixed in. "A sort of hot, sweaty, drippy mess."
  • For the sequel, ten years later, Tony and the artists at Alterian, Inc. would follow a similar approach. At first though, they considered giving the zombies a more desiccated look as an alternative to the wet look developed for the original. The Alterian team did makeup tests right off the bat, taking the zombie looks from the first film and projecting them out ten years into the future imagining that all of their juices would have leaked out. The dried-out looks would highlight skin pulled back over the teeth, a tighter bone structure underneath the taut skin and sun-dried flesh. The skin tones would feature more reds and browns with a little blistering thrown in, or, as Tony called it, " not quite barbecue chicken." Yet in the end, it was director Ruben Fleischer who insisted on bringing back the juice. Though he agreed that the dried-out look made logical sense, he noted that there was a signature Zombieland look, " and these things need to be true to that look." That 'Zombieland look' consisted of open wounds, discolored and caved-in skin, plus mismatched eyes with brown and black fluids leaking from every hole.
  • The Alterian crew created a wide array of zombies. Including one variety who our heroes, in a delightful reference to the Terminator films, call the 'T-800s'. These zombies are fast-moving and can take a lot of damage. They may be missing limbs or part of their heads, but they just keep on coming.
  • Other zombies included the heavy-set, slow-witted 'Homer,' a cleaner-looking, smarter zombie called 'The Hawking,' and the super-fast, nearly impossible to see 'Ninjas.'
  • Though many shows have stuck to the tried and true foam latex for their zombies, the prosthetics in Zombieland: Double Tap were primarily run in silicone. This choice made it easier to achieve the depth to the skin that they were looking for and to give it, "a sick sort of translucency," said Tony. The zombie appliances ran the gamut from little blister appliances to big jagged wounds, many of them layered all together. A minimal number of Pros-Aide appliances were also used for some of the zombie makeups. (Zombies! Images courtesy Columbia Pictures and Alterian, Inc.)
  • Playing one of the primary 'T-800' zombies, performer Ari Loeb would have more than twenty appliances applied, including little blisters on his ears, inside his ears, and even inside his nose.
  • To add depth, so that they didn't just look like Halloween makeups, several of the performers playing zombies had sections of their beards or hair shaved off. Wounds would then be applied to these open areas.
  • The main exceptions to the silicone rule were the exploding heads. These were made from rigid foam with a foam latex skin. As Tony Gardner explained, the positions in which the heads were required to be supported, with the skin and skull underneath, would have been too heavy if constructed from silicone.
  • What would a zombie movie be without a bunch of blood and goo? Tony Gardner revealed that there were some cold and sticky nights on the set for the fluid-soaked actors portraying zombies so heated tents were provided, with the lead actor zombies provided with showers. The makeup crew used Skin Illustrator for the foundation colors, sometimes applying the airbrush colors with a brush so that the drips running down the performers' faces, arms and legs would stay in place. Hair gel was used to keep the zombies' hair looking wet and spray bottles filled with watered-down Methocel were kept on hand for slimy touch-ups.
  • The blood and goo covering the zombies came in all types of colors, viscosities, and flavors. For blood, there were several combinations including coffee, chocolate sauce and Karo syrup in different proportions. Each concoction would be used for specific shots and effects. Makeup artists applied the blood and slime in layers, with the darker stuff leaking from the nose, mouth, and ears while lighter colors were used around the eyes to avoid a 'raccoon' look. Working with the wardrobe team, Alterian artists smeared and splattered their blood and goo concoctions all over the zombies' clothing to create the illusion of bodily fluids leaking out everywhere, making them as gross as possible. The performers had "no way out," Tony laughs. "If you were going to be a zombie, there was no way not to be gooey."
  • Because of the large number of zombies required for the film, many of those in the background were created with the help of tattoo transfers derived from flat artwork. According to Tony, "drawing all of the blistering, especially on the 'T-800' zombies, would've just been horrendous."
  • According to Tony Gardner, all the returning cast had script approval. But actor Woody Harrelson also had vomit approval. In the scene where Zoey Deutch gets sick, Harrelson requested a chunkier spew. The Alterian crew happily obliged by mixing up a delicious blend of vanilla pudding, a little honey, some almond milk, and hunks of granola for bulk.
  • When two new characters, played by actors Luke Wilson and Thomas Middleditch, succumb to the infection, director Ruben Fleischer wanted them to transform from human to zombie right in front of our eyes. Both actors were made up with prosthetics and had, as Tony says, "all of this stuff leaking out of them." With each cut, the characters move further along in their zombification. Stunt doubles were also made up to match the two actors as they changed, sometimes switching out as the camera moved past during a take. "The good part," says Tony, "is that we had two actors that were really gung-ho about doing all of it and wearing the lenses and just spitting up junk and having no problems doing it."
  • There were trailers full of people and for the big finale, Tony was able to bring in even more makeup artists from Los Angeles for the last two weeks of the shoot.

Spoilers

  • It was hinted that Jesse Eisenberg's character, Columbus, will have a set of new rules coming up for this film. In fact, it's actually Thomas Middleditch, who plays a Columbus-like character named Flagstaff who has his own similar set of "Commandments".
  • This is Bill Murray's 3rd zombie film. The first Zombieland (2009), and the second released in 2019; The Dead Don't Die (2019).
  • Luke Wilson and Thomas Middleditch's characters are called Albuquerque and Flagstaff respectively. These were going to be the original names of Woody Harrelson and Jesse Eisenberg's characters respectively before Tallahassee and Columbus were chosen for them.
  • The end of the film reveals that "Day Zero" (the beginning of the zombie apocalypse) coincided with the 2009 release of 'Garfield 3: Flabby Tabby' and shows a zombie outbreak during the press interviews for the film with Bill Murray. Of course this is just a fun parody, as Bill Murray never made a third Garfield film.
  • A poster for Garfield 3 can be seen in the mall before Columbus finds Madison.
  • The Elvis Presley classic "Burning Love" that is played during the end credits was performed by Woody Harrelson.
  • Dan Aykroyd was rumored to be appearing as a fictionalized version of himself alongside Bill Murray, but this proved false in the final cut.
  • Before Columbus goes to kill Madison as she allegedly turns into a zombie, he says, "Time to teach Lenny about the rabbits." This is a reference to John Steinbeck's novel 'Of Mice and Men," when George has to go kill Lenny, whom he distracts by talking about rabbits.
  • While killing zombies during the mid-credits scene, Bill Murray quotes several lines from some of his most famous movies, including Ghostbusters (1984).
  • Music playing during the first post credit scene, during the Garfield 3 junket, is the Kenny Loggins song "I'm Alright", which was the theme music for Caddyshack (1980), starring Bill Murray.
  • Though Nevada claims to be from Washoe County, later specifying Reno, Rosario Dawson does not pronounce "Nevada" the way locals do. Locals to the state pronounce the second syllable like the a in "apple," not like the au in "auto."
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