TÁR

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  • Trailer 1

Movie Info & Cast

Synopsis

Set in the international world of classical music, the film centers on Lydia Tár. widely considered one of the greatest living composer/conductors and first-ever female chief conductor of a major German orchestra.

Cast

  • Cate Blanchett
  • Noémie Merlant
  • Nina Hoss
  • Sophie Kauer
  • Mark Strong
  • Julian Glover
  • Allan Corduner
  • Sylvia Flote
  • Sydney Lemmon
  • Vincent Riotta

Atom User Reviews

4.4 out of 5
35
23
3
3
1
POPULAR TAGS
#original
#awardbuzz
#greatcast
#intense
#mustsee
#great
#seeingitagain
#clever
#smart
#surprising
#slow
#epic
#notmyfave
Verified Review

This film is contemplative and intelligent. If you need fast and simple, don't see it. Great acting, amazing mood and atmosphere, incredible music, and a story which illustrates the complex nature of our times. Very much an amazing movie, if you like movies that require you to think.

ML
Mark L
Verified Review
#slow
#intense
#original
#awardbuzz

Loved Cate Blanchett in it. Some parts were not clear but it was a work of art to me.

MM
Mo M

Metacritic

75
Oct 28, 2022

Field and Blanchett have given us an unforgettable character presented in almost molecular detail, and a glorious, guts-and-Gustav behind-the-scenes plunge into a rarefied world few of us have so much as dabbled in or seriously wondered about, even if we know our Tchaikovsky from our Mahler, pianissimo from forte.

Metacritic review by Roger Moore
Roger Moore
Movie Nation
100
Oct 17, 2022

To watch Tár properly requires mental recursion. The surface of each scene is perfectly legible, but the full import of what you’re watching is elusive till the end of the scene, or even the sequence. The end of the film recasts everything that’s come before it. It’s like Kierkegaard’s old saw, embodied: Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.

Alissa Wilkinson
Vox
50
Oct 12, 2022

The movie is a slew of illustrated plot points and talking points but, between the shots and the slogans, neither its protagonist nor its world seems to exist at all.

Richard Brody
The New Yorker