Buy tickets for Star Wars!

Suspicion (1941)

Find Movie Theaters & Showtimes

for near
Set your location to find movies & theaters nearby
in
Hmm... we couldn't find any showtimes for this date and location.

Videos & Photos

  • Trailer for Suspicion

Movie Info & Cast

Synopsis

Wealthy, sheltered Joan Fontaine is swept off her feet by charming ne'er-do-well Cary Grant. Though warned that Grant is little more than a fortune-hunter, Fontaine marries him anyway. She remains loyal to her irresponsible husband as he plows his way from one disreputable business scheme to another. Gradually, Fontaine comes to the conclusion that Grant intends to do away with her in order to collect her inheritance...a suspicion confirmed when Grant's likeable business partner Nigel Bruce dies under mysterious circumstances. To his dying day, Hitchcock insisted that he wanted to retain the novelist Francis Iles' original ending, but that the RKO executives intervened. Fontaine won an Academy Award for her work.~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide

Cast

  • Cary Grant
  • Joan Fontaine
  • Cedric Hardwicke
  • Nigel Bruce
  • May Whitty
  • Isabel Jeans
  • Heather Angel
  • Auriol Lee
  • Reginald Sheffield
  • Leo G. Carroll

Did You Know?

Trivia

  • DIRECTOR CAMEO (Sir Alfred Hitchcock): (At around forty-five minutes) Mailing a letter at the village post office.
See more »

Goofs

  • At :15 into the film, Cary Grant's character, whose name has been seen in numerous photos identified as "Johnnie Aysgarth" (and is so-named in the closing credits), a telegram to Joan Fontaine's character is signed, "Johnny."
See more »

Quotes

    • [first lines]
    • Johnnie Aysgarth: Oh, I beg your pardon. Was that your leg? I had no idea we were going into a tunnel. I thought the compartment was empty.
See more »
Movie details provided by

Atom User Reviews

No one has posted a user review yet.

Metacritic

70

One must remark that the ending is not up to Mr. Hitchcock's usual style, and the general atmosphere of the picture is far less genuine than he previously has wrought. But still he has managed to bring through a tense and exciting tale, a psychological thriller which is packed with lively suspense and a picture that entertains you from beginning to—well, almost the end.

Metacritic review by Bosley Crowther
Bosley Crowther
The New York Times
90

Everyone concedes that this 1941 Hitchcock film is a failure, yet it displays so much artistic seriousness that I find its failure utterly mysterious—especially since the often criticized ending (imposed on Hitchcock by the studio) makes perfect sense to me.

Metacritic review by Dave Kehr
Dave Kehr
Chicago Reader