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Trivia for Mad Max

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  • Max's yellow interceptor car, a Ford Falcon XB coupe, was originally a police car from the Australian state of Victoria.
  • The van that is smashed in the opening chase was long reported to be George Miller's own vehicle, as the production was running out of money. However, only the first shot of the vehicle (driving) was actually Miller's Bongo. The van that was smashed was a wreck from a scrapyard. About twenty percent of the chase scenes scheduled were not shot, due to lack of money.
  • (Cameo) James McCausland: The bearded man wearing an apron in front of the roadside diner watching the police cyclists and tow trucks drive away is the film's co-writer.
  • George Miller was inspired by A Boy and His Dog (1975).
  • Because he was relatively unknown in the U.S., trailers and previews did not feature Mel Gibson, instead focusing on the car crashes and action scenes.
  • Goose's motorcycle is a 1977 Kawasaki Z1000, but the metal "Kawasaki" badge has been removed from the gas tank and replaced with a decal that reads "Kwaka" - clearly visible on the Blu-ray version at 0:40:50.
  • Because of the tight budget, actual decommissioned police cars were used in the film. Only Steve Bisley (Goose) was wearing real leathers. All the other police officers were wearing vinyl costumes. The motorcycles, all late model demonstration units, were donated by Kawasaki. Many of the bikers kept them after the shooting was completed.
  • Mel Gibson didn't go to the audition for this film to read for a part, he actually went along with his sister, who was auditioning. But because he had been in a bar fight the night before, and his head looked like "a black and blue pumpkin" (his words), he was told he could come back and audition in three week's time because, "we need freaks!" He did return in three weeks' time, wasn't recognized (because his injuries had healed well), and was asked to read for a part.
  • Max's yellow Interceptor was a 1974 Ford Falcon XB sedan (previously, a Melbourne police car) with a 351 cubic inch (5.7 liter) Cleveland V8 engine, and many other modifications. The Big Bopper, driven by Roop and Charlie, was also a 1974 Ford Falcon XB sedan, but was powered by a 302 cubic inch (5.0 liter) V8. The March Hare, driven by Sarse and Scuttle, was an in-line-six-powered 1972 Ford Falcon XA sedan (this car was formerly a Melbourne taxi cab). The most memorable car, Max's black Pursuit Special - frequently designated an "Interceptor", based on a mechanic's quote in Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1981) - was a limited GT351 version of a 1973 Ford XB Falcon Hardtop (sold in Australia from December 1973 to August 1976), which was primarily modified by Murray Smith, Peter Arcadipane, and Ray Beckerley. After filming was over, this Interceptor was bought and restored by Bob Forsenko, and is currently on display in the Cars of the Stars Motor Museum in Cumbria, England. The Nightrider's vehicle, another Pursuit Special, was a 1972 Holden HQ LS Monaro coupe. The car driven by the couple, that is destroyed by the bikers, was a 1959 Chevrolet Impala sedan. Of the motorcycles that appear in the film, fourteen were donated by Kawasaki, and were driven by a local Victorian motorcycle gang, the Vigilantes, who appeared as members of Toecutter's gang. By the end of filming, fourteen vehicles had been destroyed in the chase and crash scenes, including George Miller's personal Mazda Bongo.
  • The "old meat-grinder" scene was shot on the West Gate Freeway bridge while it was still under construction.
  • The "get-out-of-jail-free card" that Goose gives the triker was an on-set joke. Because of the limited budget, the biker gang was an actual biker gang (the Vigilantes), and they had to ride to the set each day in-costume; often with their prop weapons displayed. Since the production company expected them to be pulled over by the local police, each was given a letter explaining the film's peculiar requirements, and asking for law-enforcement's understanding and cooperation.
  • Frankie J. Holden stated in an interview that he auditioned for the role of Jim Goose, while he was an unknown actor, but thinks that he did not get the role because George Miller did not take too kindly to Holden's criticism of the script when they chatted after his audition.
  • Steve Bisley's eyes are red and puffy, because he had to spend several hours suspended in the truck.
  • Tim Burns (Johnny the Boy) was so into character that he annoyed everyone on-set, and was abandoned one day during lunch while handcuffed to the wreck.
  • The burned hand that falls into view in the hospital is actually Sheila Florance's (May Swaisey).
  • George Miller paid a truck driver fifty dollars to run over the bike at the final scene. However, the truck driver didn't want to damage his rig; thus the crew had to install a shield painted to look like the front of the rig.
  • Max's MFP (Main Force Patrol) number is 4073, Jim Goose's is 2241, Charlie's is either 3840 or 3842.
  • The auto accident scene was made as realistic as possible, thanks to George Miller's experience as a medical doctor.
  • The stolen interceptor driven by the Nightrider in the opening scenes is another production vehicle. It is an "HQ Holden Monaro", which was sold in Australia in the early '70s with a variety of motors including large capacity V8s. Also, the other police vehicles in the movie, were sedan versions of the XB, although one was the previous model XA..They also had 351 cubic inch engines, and are a common car on Australian roads.
  • The voice of Robina Chaffey, the singer of the Sugartown Night Club, was the only voice left undubbed in this film's original U.S. release.
  • Besides Mel Gibson, only one other actor appeared in this film and Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1981). That was Max Fairchild - originally as Benno, and then as a pleading hostage on the front of Humungus' car.
  • The first scene shot was that of Johnny breaking the chain on the overpass phone. He appears hurried, not only because of the storyline, but also because the film company didn't have permission to shoot on that overpass.
  • Only two original Interceptors were used in the Mad Max movies. The one that was used in this film was modified and reused in all of the interior and close-up car shots in Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1981). After filming was over, this Interceptor was bought and restored by Bob Fursenko, and was on display in the "Cars of the Stars Motor Museum" in England. The Cars of the Stars Motor Museum was in the English town of Keswick, Cumbria, and included a collection of celebrity television and film vehicles. On May 8, 2011, the attraction closed, with a message on the museum website stating "...check the website for details of the relocation of the vehicles to a new location shortly..." As of December 2011, all the cars have been sold, except for the original Only Fools and Horses.... (1981) Reliant van. Another car was built for the chase scenes in the second movie, but that one was destroyed when the script required it to be pushed off the road and blown up. The wreckage used to be viewable at Broken Hill, Australia, but due to thefts it can't be found there any longer. The Planet Hollywood Interceptor is a replica and was never used in any of the films.
  • Sheila Florance broke her knee when she tripped while running with the antique shotgun. She returned to complete her scenes with her leg and hip in plaster.
  • One of the yellow interceptors, a Ford Falcon XA GCI, was a decommissioned taxi cab.
  • Early in the film there is a brief shot of two road signs. They read: "Anarchie" (Anarchy), and "Bedlam." This Road sign actually exists in Australia.
  • The film's post-production was done at producer Byron Kennedy's house, with director George Miller and Kennedy editing the film in Kennedy's bedroom, on a home-built editing machine that Kennedy's father, an engineer, had designed for them. Miller and Kennedy also edited the sound there.
  • The Nightrider's spectacular crash was the result of a military booster rocket being installed in the back of the car. It went out of control, missed the target fuel tanker, and veered off into the field where it chased the film crew for 1/4 mile. The on-camera explosion was a later re-creation using a safer towed car.
  • Some of the things Nightrider says over the radio are lyrics from the AC/DC song "Rocker."
  • The blue van that was wrecked in the film's opening chase, had the engine removed, and was pushed into the path of the oncoming cars by off-camera assistants. The lack of the engine's weight caused the van to spin uncontrollably, adding to the spectacular crash. The buckets atop the roof were filled with milk.
  • The car that Max drives (a black "Pursuit Special"; the phrase "the last of the V8s" was used once, and later as "the last of the V8 interceptors" was used until Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1981)) is a production car, the Ford "XB Falcon Coupe", sold in Australia from December 1973 until August 1976. The car in the film had a standard 351 cubic inch (5.7 liter) V8 engine.
  • Hugh Keays-Byrne modeled his performance of Toecutter after historical records written about Mongolian warlord Temujin, also known as Genghis Khan.
  • Hugh Keays-Byrne, Tim Burns, and Reg Evans (Toecutter, Johnny the Boy, and the stationmaster) were all classically-trained Shakespearean stage actors.
  • DIRECTOR TRADEMARK (George Miller): (doctor): Miller's past as a doctor is referenced in St. George's hospital, which features in the film. Mad Max Rockatansky is named for nineteenth century pathologist Carl von Rokitansky, originator of the Rokitansky procedure, the most common method for removal of the internal organs in an autopsy.
  • George Miller raised the money for Mad Max (1979) by working as an emergency room doctor.
  • Before the film was released in the United States, distributor American International Pictures overdubbed the actors' speaking voices. The 2002 Special Edition DVD release was the first U.S. DVD to feature the original Australian language track.
  • One of the first Australian films shot with a widescreen anamorphic lens, though predated by The Cars That Ate Paris (1974).
  • Shot in twelve weeks, on a meager $350,000 budget, in and around Melbourne.
  • The handcuffs that Max uses on Johnny the Boy are novelty (toy) handcuffs.
  • Although it is now referred to as an (or "the") Interceptor, Max's black car is technically a Pursuit Special. It was referred to as "the last of the V8 interceptors" in Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1981), but never actually named in "Mad Max". The MFP dispatcher says over the radio, after Max takes the car, "Code unspecified. We have a 'query/locate' on a black Pursuit Special: Unauthorized use by a Main Force officer. This is designated as a potential Code 3 Red Alert."
  • The knees of the vinyl MFP trousers were a weak point. In various shots, characters can be seen with trouser legs split horizontally at the knee. For example, Roop atop the bunker; Max's left knee during the fight with Johnny; and Max's right knee after he gets shot. In the opening scene, a shot of Charlie shows that his knee has been mended.
  • The white 1961 Ford Falcon station wagon seen at the diner, and outside Goose's apartment (where Johnny the Boy was hiding) was privately owned by one of the production crew, who later sold the car after the film's release.
  • In New Zealand, the film was given the R18 rating for graphic violence.
  • Hugh Keays-Byrne, who plays Toecutter, went on to play Immortan Joe in Mad Max: Fury Road (2015).
  • At the time of the film's release, the American audience had virtually no experience with, and therefore very great difficulty understanding, dialogue with an Australian accent. That's why Mel Gibson's voice was overdubbed by another actor - to prevent otherwise-certain commercial failure of Mad Max in the U.S., due to Americans' rejection of "unintelligible" characters.
  • The custom blower on the Pursuit Special was purely cosmetic, it was belted up to a starter motor underneath the hood, and did nothing to the air intake.
  • Only film in the franchise not to end on, nor contain, narration.
  • In a 2015 interview with The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith podcast, George Miller said that it was not the intention when the script was written, to set it in a post-apocalyptic world. This was done because they didn't have the money for extras and properly maintained buildings. In order to cover for this production value limitation, the title card was added to the beginning, explaining the story was set after a world war. This also accounts for why there is generally more of an established society in this film, than any of the sequels.
  • The film was on a such a low budget that some of the crew members had to bring in their own cars.
  • At the time of the first screening in Japan, the song "Rollin' into the Night", by Akira Kushida was played over the end credits.
  • The original cover art actually depicts Jim Goose, as "Mad" Max Rockatansky never wears a helmet with a mouthguard, nor shin and forearm shields, in the entire film.
  • The first time Tim Burns met Hugh Keays-Byrne, he introduced himself and told him he would be playing Johnny the Boy. Hugh responded by grabbing him by the face and snarled, "Johnny the Boy!"
  • In The Madness of Max (2015), it was revealed the actors who played the bikers were sometimes treated like they were actual delinquents. Geoff Parry (Bubba Zanetti) walked into a bank with bleached hair to cash a check and they refused him service. David Bracks (Mudguts) walked into a restaurant in his gear and was told to leave because they "didn't serve his kind."
  • Clunk and Diabando are the only members of Toecutter's main gang to have no spoken lines, and Diabando and Starbuck are the only members to never have their names spoken on-screen.
  • When Toecutter sticks the shotgun barrel into Johnny the Boy's mouth, it cut the inside of Tim Burns' mouth.
  • George Miller got the idea to make this movie when seeing hospital patients suffer many motorcycle and automobile accidents when working as an emergency room doctor. Most of the injuries he saw were put into the movie.
  • Included among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", edited by Steven Schneider.
  • The handgun Bubba Zanetti uses is a Mauser C96 "broomhandle".
  • Most of the extras used in the film were paid in beer.
  • According to George Miller, his interest while writing the film was "a silent movie with sound", employing highly kinetic images reminiscent of Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd, while the narrative itself was basic and simple. Miller believed that audiences would find his violent story more believable, if set in a bleak dystopian future.
  • Screenwriter James McCausland drew heavily from his observations of the 1973 oil crisis' effects on Australian motorists: "Yet there were further signs of the desperate measures individuals would take to ensure mobility. A couple of oil strikes that hit many pumps revealed the ferocity with which Australians would defend their right to fill a tank. Long queues formed at the stations with petrol-and anyone who tried to sneak ahead in the queue met raw violence. George and I wrote the script based on the thesis that people would do almost anything to keep vehicles moving, and the assumption that nations would not consider the huge costs of providing infrastructure for alternative energy, until it was too late."
  • Byron Kennedy and George Miller first took the film to Graham Burke of Roadshow, who was enthusiastic. The producers felt they would be unable to raise money from the government bodies "because Australian producers were making art films, and the corporations and commissions seemed to endorse them whole-heartedly", according to Kennedy. They designed a forty-page presentation, circulated it widely, and eventually raised the money. Kennedy and Miller also contributed funds themselves, by doing three months of emergency medical calls, with Kennedy driving the car while Miller did the doctoring.
  • For the lead role, George Miller had considered an American actor to "get the film seen as widely as possible" and even travelled to Los Angeles, but eventually opted to not do so as "the whole budget would be taken up by a so-called American name." So instead the cast would deliberately feature lesser known actors, so they did not carry past associations with them.
  • George Miller's first choice for the role of Max, was the Irish-born James Healey, who at the time worked at a Melbourne abattoir and was seeking a new acting job. Upon reading the script, Healey declined, finding the meager, terse dialogue too unappealing.
  • Most of the biker gang extras were members of actual Australian outlaw motorcycle clubs and rode their own motorcycles in the film. They were even forced to ride the motorcycles from their residence in Sydney to the shooting locations in Melbourne because the budget did not allow for aerial transport.
  • Three of the main cast members (Hugh Keays-Byrne, Roger Ward, and Vincent Gil) had previously appeared in Stone (1974), a movie about biker gangs that is said to have inspired George Miller.
  • Scenes cut from the film: * Jessie shaving Max after the Nightrider chase. * After The Toecutter and his gang come into town to pick up The Nightrider's body, they wander around the town and meet the locals. * Max and Goose drag racing each other for fun, with Max riding a bike and Goose driving a car. * Max arming himself for his quest, including sawing off his shotgun. * During Max's pursuit of the bikers, the engine in the interceptor cuts out. * Prior to finding Johnny Boy, Max tends to his wounds. This scene appears in the trailer and in the opening montage of Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1981).
  • Judy Davis was said to have auditioned for the role of Jessie and passed over, but George Miller has declared she was only there to accompany her classmates Mel Gibson and Steve Bisley.
  • Originally, filming was scheduled to take ten weeks-six weeks of first unit, and four weeks on stunt and chase sequences. However, four days into shooting, Rosie Bailey, who was originally cast as Jessie, was injured in a bike accident. Production was halted, and Bailey was replaced by Joanne Samuel, causing a two-week delay.
  • George Miller described the whole experience as "guerrilla filmmaking", where the crew would close roads without filming permits, not use walkie-talkies because their frequency coincided with the police radio, and after filming was done Miller and Byron Kennedy would even sweep down the roads. Still, as filming progressed the Victoria Police became interested in the production, helping the crew by closing down roads and escorting the vehicles.
  • This was one of the first Australian films to be shot with a widescreen anamorphic lens, although The Cars That Ate Paris (1974) was shot in anamorphic four years earlier. George Miller's desire to shoot in anamorphic made him seek a set of Todd-AO wide angle lenses used by Sam Peckinpah to film The Getaway (1972), which were damaged enough in that shoot to get discarded in Australia. The only one which worked properly was a 35mm lens which was employed in the whole of the film.
  • Tony Paterson edited the film for four months, then had to leave because he was contracted to make Dimboola (1979). George Miller took over editing with Cliff Hayes, and they worked on it for three months. Miller and Byron Kennedy did the final cut, in a process Miller described as "he would cut sound in the lounge room, and I'd cut picture in the kitchen."
  • Sound engineer Roger Savage would perform the sound mixing in the studio. He worked after finishing his work with Little River Band, and employed timecoding techniques that were unseen in Australian cinema.
  • George Miller wanted a Gothic, Bernard Herrmann-type score, and hired Brian May after hearing his work for Patrick (1978).
  • In November 1977, it was announced in several Australian newspapers that actress and model 'Katie Morgan would be appearing in the film as Jim Goose's girlfriend, named Calamine.
  • Entertainment Weekly ranked this Number Three on their "Guilty Pleasures: Testosterone Edition" list in their March 30, 2007 issue.
  • Mel Gibson got the part of Max Rockatansky while still a drama student. He was paid $10,000.
  • The Interceptor cost over $35,000 to build. That's more than three times Mel Gibson's salary for the movie.
  • The truck driver was paid fifty dollars and a case of beer for his vehicle and driving.
  • One scene is an homage to the train station scene in High Noon (1952).
  • George Miller described the film as "a western in new clothes".
  • George Miller mounted cameras on the cars, to put the audience in the middle of the action.
  • The filmmakers used an Australian Navy rocket for one stunt.
  • Special effects supervisor Chris Murray put oil on the tires to make them smoke.
  • Hugh Keays-Byrne changes his accent, scene to scene, to make his character seem insane.
  • George Miller has called the film a mix of two genres - the car action movie and the horror movie.
  • For one shot, cinematographer David Eggby held the camera while he was a passenger on a motorcycle going 110 miles per hour. Recalling the scene, he said, "I knew we were risking our lives out there."
  • The house used for May's farmhouse was abandoned, and had to be filled with furniture from the filmmakers' own houses.
  • The crew couldn't afford a breakaway prop door, so the actors had to break through solid wood.
  • The filmmakers mixed crow noises into the seagull sounds to make one scene more ominous.
  • A lot of the stunt driving in this movie was illegal, and done quickly, before authorities could find out.
  • No stunt doubles were used for the hand-to-hand fighting.
  • May holds a Charles Parker 1878 shotgun. They stopped making them after World War II.
  • The movie was given an R18 rating in New Zealand.
  • Reg Evans (The Station Master) and Geoff Parry (Bubba Zanetti) appeared with Mel Gibson in Gallipoli (1981).
  • The Grease Rat is working on a 1936 Chevrolet two-door Town Sedan.
  • The 1959 Chevy Impala was about to be junked before the crew rescued it.
  • Goose's motorcycle is a 1977 Kawasaki KZ-1000. It has a top speed of 120 miles per hour. The sticker on the side, is of a goose wearing goggles.
  • George Miller estimates that there are only fifty frames of explicit violence in the film. The rest is implied.
  • Jessie doesn't use real sign language. They're just some movements that Joanne Samuel made up.
  • Max's last name is a reference to Baron Carl von Rokitansky, a physician from the 1800s. Before he was a director, George Miller was a medical doctor.
  • It was Roger Ward's idea for his character to wear a scarf in one scene. "If I was going bare top, I was going to wear a tie."
  • Because Mel Gibson was a complete unknown, Roger Ward was the most famous person on-set.
  • Steve Bisley claimed that he got the role of Jim Goose because he knew how to ride a motorcycle, rather than his acting ability.
  • Mel Gibson and Steve Bisley were roommates at Australia's National Institute of Dramatic Art. It was Bisley who encouraged Gibson to audition for the film.
  • If you look closely at The Toecutter's first scene. One of The Toecutter's gang members has the Pepsi logo on his helmet.
  • The only film in the franchise to have the R18 rating in New Zealand.
  • Critics complained about the level of violence in the film. But if you watch the film, the worst scenes of violence happen off-screen, and we only see the aftermath of the violence.
  • Often credited as the movie that opened up the global market for Australian movies. On its shoestring budget, it managed to gross $100 million worldwide - setting a new record for most profitable independent film of all time. It held that Guinness World record until it was out-grossed by The Blair Witch Project (1999).
  • Mel Gibson and Steve Bisley were pulled over by a highway patrolman while driving to the location in their prop V-8 Interceptor and wearing their futurecop fetish gear.
  • At the beginning of the movie, there is graffiti sprayed onto a boulder, reading the words "f**k you" in Greek, a nod to George Miller's Greek heritage.
  • It has been speculated that the Marvel comic book "The Punisher", which was first published in 1974, was a possible major influence behind Mad Max. Like Max Rockatansky, the comic's main protagonist, Frank Castle, becomes the vigilante known as "The Punisher", after his family is murdered by the Mafia.
  • This movie served as an inspiration for the Max Payne series.
  • In the opening scene, if you look closely at the Highway 9 Sector 26 sign. There is a date written on the sign: December 6th 1984 and the MFP sign at the Halls of Justice also has a date on it: MFP Established in 1983. Even though these signs were canon to the film. George Miller said during an earlier interview in the exact same year of 1984. Mad Max and Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior were meant to be set in the late '90s.
  • When George Miller was developing the movie, the film wasn't going to be a science fiction film set in a dystopic future and originally the character of Max Rockatansky wasn't a policeman who succumbs to madness when he loses his family and that Max was a journalist who becomes a shell of a man when goes from one place to another witnessing horrific accidents.
  • The script by James McCausland and George Miller is a huge and detailed document that outlined the movie that Miller wanted to shoot. It turned out to have 214 pages. Only about half of it was actually shot, and that half was later cut down some more in editing.
  • Of the ten brand new Kawasaki Z1000 lent to the film crews, only three of those returned after filming in a complete condition. The bikes were lent from a local Kawasaki distributor, who in turn lent it from the importer.
  • According to several interviews with George Miller during pre-production period - the original script was a satire on the speed mentality on the road, kids on fast bikes, fast cars, scavenger tow trucks and ambulances, it was more satirical concerning car accidents, the scarcity of car parts and mechanics-looters, while the film is rather a car-action movie on the confrontation between road cops and biker gangs, psychological thriller and revenge story. However, some elements of the original conceive can be seen as the background and setting of the main story. Also in the original script Max has a driving partner named The Dark One, whose initials Max's car still has on right fender in the film.
  • Much of Mad Max's visual slickness is down to being shot in the anamorphic format, one of the first Australian films to do so, and only made possible by salvaging a damaged 35mm lens left behind from the shoot of Sam Peckinpah's The Getaway (1972).
  • Because The Toecutter (Hugh Keays-Byrne) murders Max's family and friends and sets Max on a murderous revenge, it is he (Toecutter) who is directly responsible for "The Road Warrior's" existence in future films.
  • Bubba Zanetti (Geoff Parry) shoots Max through the kneecap with his Mauser C96 during an ambush. It is because of this injury why Max wears the squeaking makeshift leg brace in the sequels.

Spoilers

  • This movie was banned in New Zealand for the scene when Goose is burned alive inside of his vehicle. It mirrored an incident with a real gang not long before the film came out. It was later shown in New Zealand in 1983, after the huge success of the sequel Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1981), but only as long as it had an R18 certificate.
  • Only film in the franchise where Max's Pursuit Special (later named in the sequels as the "Last of the V8 Interceptors.") survives to the end of the film. The car is destroyed in Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1981), when the Toadie tries to take the car's gas, and then crashes twice in Mad Max: Fury Road (2015). The Interceptor does not appear in Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome (1985).
  • Though asked by Max, but never elaborated on as to its meaning, the Toecutter gang has a small tattoo on the majority of each member located near or around their face ("Nightrider" right cheek. "Toecutter" right temple. "Bubba Zanetti" left cheek and so on) in the shape of the Greek symbol/letter "F", which is represented by a small circle with a vertical line running through its middle. This symbol, however, is not present on Johnny the Boy in the film, who is seen as the novice member of the gang, who is still being "taught" as it were. It is not until after he is responsible, and partakes in the death of MFP officer Jim Goose, is Johnny the Boy seen brandishing the gang tattoo on the left side of his neck at the end of the film, when Max handcuffs him to the back of the crashed vehicle he was looting. This would be a strong indication that the tattoo the Toecutter's gang wear is a symbol of their commitment by participating in the murder of a "Bronze" officer, as it is mentioned that Nightrider, who bares this mark as well, is a referred to as a "Cop Killer" at the films beginning, indicating that the Toecutter gang have been involved in the deaths of members of the Main Force Patrol. Given George Miller's Greek heritage, that is hinted at throughout the film and its sequels, and that Johnny the Boy is seen to be marked with the tattoo after he has committed murder, the symbol is more than likely to represent the first letter of the Greek word (foniás) which means "Killer".
  • The speech Max gives to Fifi, "Any longer out on that road, I am one of them. A terminal crazy. I wear the bronze badge to show them that I'm one of the good guys." foreshadows what is going to happen to Max, and sums up the character.
  • The scene at the end with Max chaining Johnny the Boy to a truck about to explode and leaving him a saw to either attempt to saw through the chain or his own limb is similar to a scene from the Watchmen graphic novel where, in a flashback, Walter Kovacs/Rorschach finds a child molester and murderer who butchered a little girl and fed her remains to his dogs. In the graphic novel, Kovacs handcuffs the man to a pipe and leaves him a hand-saw to cut himself loose either through the pipe or the leg. At the same time, Kovacs sets a fire in the man's house and leaves the man to his fate. The only difference in the scene from the Watchmen graphic novel and Mad Max is that Kovacs takes the saw from the man and it is confirmed that he burns to death while Johnny the Boy is not confirmed to have died in the explosion.
  • Often referred as "The last V8 INTERCEPTOR", the black Pursuit-Special is not once called by that throughout the entire movie. In fact it has no special signature or name like the usual MFP Falcons, which are identified as PURSUIT or INTERCEPTOR on the trunks.
  • 5 years before the film was released, a character called The Punisher made his debut in the Marvel comic book The Amazing Spider-Man #129 (February 1974). In the comics, The Punisher is a vigilante whom hunts down, kills, kidnaps and tortures criminals in his crusade against crime. In his backstory, The Punisher is Frank Castle, a former Italian American police detective whom became The Punisher when his family was slain by gangsters. Max Rockatansky bares some similarities with The Punisher: Max is a cop. Max's family are slain by a motorcycle gang. Max becomes Mad Max and goes vigilante and seeks to avenge his family. Max tortures a mechanic on the whereabouts of the Toecutter and his associates. Max eliminates the motorcycle gang and kills Johnny the Boy by handcuffing him to a ruptured fuel tank that explodes.
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