Friday the 13th Part IV: The Final Chapter Movie Poster

Trivia for Friday the 13th Part IV: The Final Chapter

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  • Kimberly Beck stated in the Crystal Lake Memories book that she does not like the horror genre. In addition to this, she also said that she feels this film was not even a B-movie, but rather a C-movie.
  • The film was released on Friday the 13th: April 13, 1984.
  • Peter Barton was talked into taking a role in this film by his The Powers of Matthew Star (1982) co-star Amy Steel who played Ginny in Friday the 13th Part 2 (1981).
  • After Jason actor Ted White finished his scenes for this film, he immediately started work on Starman (1984). While on set for the night's filming, a group of reporters were waiting to interview Jeff Bridges, but he was unavailable. Therefore, director, John Carpenter, told the reporters to talk to White about the film he had recently finished. After telling the reporters he had just finished playing Jason in the latest Friday the 13th film, the next day's article was entirely about him, and that night, numerous "Friday" fans arrived at the set solely in order to see White.
  • It has been suggested that the only reasons Tom Savini worked as make-up artist on this film was in order that he could accurately age and properly kill the character he created from the first film.
  • (at around 35 mins) The strange dance which Jimbo performs at the party was contributed by actor Crispin Glover and was based on the eccentric way he actually danced in clubs. On the set he was dancing to "Back in Black" by AC/DC as the scene was filmed. In the film however an edited version of "Love Is a Lie" by Lion was dubbed into the scene.
  • Camilla More actually read for the role of Samantha, but when the producers discovered she had a twin, they offered both sisters the roles of Tina and Terri.
  • (at around 1h 2 mins) In one scene, Rob talks to Trish about his sister, Sandra. Sandra was one of Jason's victims in Friday the 13th Part 2 (1981).
  • At the time, this installment of the series contained the most nudity and gore.
  • During filming Kimberly Beck, who plays Trish, experienced strange occurrences including a man watching her while she ran in the park and strange phone calls at all hours. This stopped when production was over.
  • Bonnie Hellman's agents told her about a possible role in this film - the hitchhiker - but then told her that she would not want to do it, as there were no lines. However, she ended up taking the role anyway.
  • On a budget of $1,800,000 the film made $32,600,000 at the box office.
  • The film takes place on Sunday the 15th and beyond which makes it the second "Friday" film not to actually take place on a Friday at all. While the beginning with the coroners takes place during the night of Sunday the 15th, the rest of the film takes place on Monday the 16th, with Tuesday the 17th being the climactic night.
  • Director Joseph Zito was opposed to using clips from previous installments at the beginning of the film.
  • Barbara Howard used a body double for her shower sex scene.
  • Director Joseph Zito wanted Jason's hockey mask to explode apart in the opening credits, but there was not enough time in post-production to pull off this gag.
  • (at around 9 mins) The moment where Jason's hand moves in the morgue was done by Ted White after Joseph Zito had called cut on the scene. However, the camera was still rolling, and caught this movement, and it was included in the film.
  • The female hitchhiker was called "Fat Girl" in the original draft of the script.
  • (at around 20 mins) The Jarvis family sandwich hug was based on a group hug that screenwriter Barney Cohen's family did.
  • Rob was originally supposed to have high-tech equipment which he had used to track Jason, but the props for this looked cheap, and the idea was scrapped.
  • The Jarvis family's dog, Gordon, was named after a recently deceased dog which a friend of director Joseph Zito owned.
  • The film was shot entirely in California.
  • Paramount was originally going to release the film in October, 1984. After filming wrapped in January Paramount studio head Frank Mancuso Sr. screened footage of the film to much enthusiasm. After a window opened up the release date was changed to April upon confirmation from Joseph Zito that he could complete the film faster than planned. This led to Zito, producer Frank Mancuso Jr., and a crew of editors essentially remaining locked in a house in Malibu editing around the clock in order to finish the film on time. This marked one of the only times that Paramount actively helped in the production of a Friday the 13th film, as they were generally produced independently, with the studio only handling marketing and distribution.
  • The house used for the Jarvis home was later used as the Anderson home in the film Ed Gein (2000) where serial killer Ed Gein is apprehended.
  • This is the only film in the series to shoot new footage using sets and locations from a previous film. The beginning takes place on the set of Friday the 13th Part III (1982), before moving to a new location.
  • (at around 10 mins) The workout video Axel watches is Aerobicise (1982). It stars Darcy DeMoss who went on to have a role in Friday the 13th Part VI: Jason Lives (1986).
  • (at around 9 mins) The nurse's name tag reads "R. Morgan, RN," an homage to actress Robbi Morgan, who played Annie in Friday the 13th (1980).
  • Kimberly Beck is the only Friday the 13th actress that appeared in an Alfred Hitchcock film. She worked on Marnie (1964), exactly 20 years prior to this. She plays the little girl that Marnie's mother babysits.
  • Distinguished film critic Roger Ebert called this film "an immoral and reprehensible piece of trash."
  • Both Corey Feldman and Crispin Glover later appeared in different films with actor Kiefer Sutherland in the same year: Feldman in Stand by Me (1986) and Glover in At Close Range (1986).
  • Last film in the series to pick up immediately where the previous film left off.
  • Joseph Zito had previously directed The Prowler (1981), but they wanted him to both direct AND write Friday the 13th Part 4. He said, "But I'm not a writer," to which they said, "Here's a contract paying you double to write and direct," and then he responded, "Yeah, I'm totally a writer." Zito used the extra salary to hire Barney Cohen to somewhat secretly write the script. Their process entailed Zito taking nightly one-hour phone calls with Phil Scuderi to discuss the story and script for Final Chapter. The next day Zito would meet Cohen in an apartment in New York to relay what notes and ideas Scuderi had offered, which they would then turn into new script pages to be sent later that day to Scuderi in Boston to be discussed again over the phone that night.
  • Amy Steel talked Peter Barton into doing the film. By the time the Final Chapter offer came around Matthew Star was off the air, and Barton wanted no part of horror films, having hated working on Hell Night in 1981. Amy Steel somehow talked him into it, selling him on the notoriety of starring in the final Friday the 13th film.
  • Carey More's audition was to simply read one line.
  • It is played for humor throughout Final Chapter that young Tommy Jarvis (Feldman) is suddenly surrounded by horny teenagers renting a cabin he can see into from his own house. However, the reality of the situation is that those actresses were indeed very or partially naked, and Corey Feldman was still young enough that Erich Anderson and Kimberly Beck took him trick-or-treating the first day of filming since it happened to be October 31, 1983. So, they shielded 12-year-old Feldman from most of the bad stuff, using tricky editing when necessary. What they could not control was the power of a low-cut top sans bra underneath. According to Feldman, in the scene in which Jodie Aronson's character bends over to greet Tommy's dog unbeknownst to anyone but Feldman he could see down her low-cut top.
  • That was 100% Glover, either improvised on the spot or based on skills he used at dance clubs at the time, depending on who you ask. On set, he was dancing to AC/DC's "Back in Black," but the they had to dub Lion's "Love is a Lie" over that in the finished film. There are plenty of other "Crispin was so crazy" stories from the set, such as the time he forced a shut down in filming until his toy yellow submarine could be retrieved from the lake, or when he declined a request to rehearse by observing, "You know, I'm in a rain mood. Not gonna rehearse now." Shine on, you rain mood-having, crazy diamond.
  • Jason actor Ted White and special effects artist Tom Savini at first were confrontational with one another. But once White found out Savini had experience with stunts, the two became friends.
  • Writer Barney Cohen originally wrote a scene involving Jason fondling Trish's breasts but the producers vetoed it. Director Joseph Zito also disliked the scene because it made Jason seem too human and less menacing. The scene was excised.
  • This is the only Friday the 13th film where Jason does not use for any of the murders his trademark Machete.
  • At 58 years old at the time Ted White is the oldest stuntman/actor to portray Jason Voorhees.
  • The Jarvis family car is a 1970 Dodge Polara.
  • Paul's car is a 1973 Chevrolet Caprice Estate station wagon.
  • Even though he plays her son, Ted White (Jason Voorhees) is actually 11 months older than Betsy Palmer (Pamela Voorhees).
  • The ambulance driver played by Antony Ponzini & Axel and the coroner played by Bruce Mahler both appeared on the sitcom Seinfled. Ponzini as Jerry's barber Enzo and Mahler as the Rabbi in Elaine's building.
  • Robs rifle is a Winchester Model 70.
  • In Turkey this film and the next sequel, Friday the 13th: A New Beginning (1985) were released at the same time: People could watch both films back to back. Even the posters for both movies were displayed next to each other.
  • Though he disliked being involved with the film, Ted White is considered by many fans to be one of the best Jasons.
  • Was released in theaters, directly a week before Crispin Glovers (Jimmy) 20th birthday.
  • Lisa Freeman, who played Nurse Morgan, and Crispin Glover, who played Jimmy Mortimer, both would go on to be in the Back To The Future movies. Crispin Glover played George McFly in Back to the Future (1985) and Lisa Freeman played Babs in Back to the Future (1985) and Back to Future, part II (1989).
  • This is about the time Corey Feldman said he was molested by various Hollywood stars when he was a young child coming up in the business. This will be detailed in the upcoming film "The Rape of Two Coreys."
  • Rob looks to be the main male hero of the film to work alongside Final Girl Trish. Instead he dies almost immediately after encountering Jason, with the real Final Guy of the film being Tommy
  • The poster shows the hockey mask with a knife on its left eyesocket. Jason is defeated with a machete going through his left eye.
  • Joseph Zito had previously directed The Prowler, but the studio wanted him to both direct AND write Friday the 13th Part 4. He said, "But I'm not a writer," to which they said, "Here's a contract paying you double to write and direct," and then he responded, "Yeah, I'm totally a writer." Zito used the extra salary to hire Barney Cohen to somewhat secretly write the script.
  • Rather than making masks, Tommy was originally going to have been an inventor. One of his projects was a device made from a microwave oven, which would have been what he used to kill Jason. Some of this is seen in the final product in a scene where he helps repair a car.
  • Jasons death won the Golden Chainsaw Award in Dead Meat's "Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter" kill count.

Spoilers

  • Due to the production's low budget several actors had to perform uncomfortable or dangerous stunts themselves including Judie Aronson, who was required to remain submerged in a lake in near-freezing temperatures and Peter Barton, who was actually slammed into the shower wall when Jason attacks him. Ted White, who portrays Jason, advocated for several of the actors, requesting that Barton be allowed to use a crash pad and threatening to quit when director Joseph Zito refused to allow Aronson to get out of the lake between takes. White and Zito ultimately developed a combative relationship on set which resulted in White demanding his name be removed from the credits, calling it "a piece of shit."
  • In an attempt at Method acting, Lawrence Monoson decided that since his character Ted is stoned when he dies, he would try smoking pot for real in order to film the scene. However, Monoson soon found that in his intoxicated state it was too difficult to fully concentrate on filming.
  • Body Count: 14
  • According to Jason performer Ted White, Corey Feldman maintained a bratty attitude on set. Feldman maintains that this was due to poor treatment by director Joseph Zito and that during filming of the scene in which he attacks Jason with the machete he was pretending that the sandbags he struck were Zito.
  • (at around 1h 17 mins) According to Corey Feldman, the screams he made when Jason (Ted White) grabs him through the window were genuine, as he was truly terrified.
  • (at around 1h 15 mins) Joseph Zito based Rob's death scene - in which he screams "He's killing me!" as Jason attacks him - on an article he had read in the New York Times about about the real-life murder of Kitty Genovese, who was stabbed to death in the middle of the night while walking to her apartment. The article claimed that 38 neighbors heard her scream "Oh my god! He's stabbing me! He's killing me!," but no one did anything to help her. Zito had intended the sequence to be particularly gut-wrenching, as Rob had been established as a capable opponent for Jason. Upon viewing screenings of the film however, Zito realized that the way in which the scene was filmed made Rob seem pathetic and impotent rather than making Jason appear merciless, and often caused audiences to burst out laughing.
  • In an earlier draft of the script Jimmy was killed with a corkscrew.
  • (at around 1h 26 mins) The scene at the end, in which Corey Feldman hacks up Jason with a machete, was done by having Feldman chop away at two sandbags.
  • Corey Feldman wore a skullcap to create the illusion that he had shaved his head.
  • This is the second film in the series to have two surviving protagonists, the first being Friday the 13th Part 2 (1981).
  • This is the first film in the series to take place in the year it was released. According to Pamela Vorhees grave in this movie, Friday the 13th (1980) takes place in 1979. Friday the 13th Part 2 (1981) takes place 5 years after the original, which would place it in 1984. Friday the 13th Part III (1982) takes place the day after Part 2 and this movie takes place the day after Part III.
  • (at around 51 mins) Before her death, When Terri is leaving on the bike you can clearly see her sister Tina in the upstairs windows trying to look out.
  • As a result of spending so much time in the water during filming of her death scene, Judie Aronson actually developed hypothermia due to the freezing temperatures of the late night shoot.
  • This is the first entry in the series where Jason does not use a machete to kill any of his victims.
  • In the original script, Tommy was supposed to decapitate Jason with the machete, but the filmmakers decided against this just in case they would want to bring Jason back again.
  • Ted White is the second tallest actor to play Jason at 6'4".
  • Prior Friday films had favored attractive, young women as the sole remaining combatant in the battle with Jason, yet The Final Chapter gave its final girl (Trish Jarvis, played by Kimberly Beck) a little brother who is ultimately the one to deliver the kill shot to Jason. They didn't think it had been done in a slasher film before, and they wanted to create characters audiences wouldn't want to see harmed. By including the Jarvis family (divorced mother, teenage daughter, pre-teen son) opposite the more typical cabin of horny teenagers they could create more human drama and resonant tragedy, such as the moment Jason is implied to have killed Tommy and Trish's mother. It remains debatable how intentional the parallels between Jason and Tommy (both ostracized outsiders as kids, mothers murdered) were, but everyone acknowledges that Tommy's love for props and masks and the macabre were all homages to Tom Savini.
  • (at around 1h 18 mins) Corey Feldman was legitimately terrified during the window shot. As per series tradition, Jason was played by yet another stuntman in 'The Final Chapter,' this time Ted White, a seasoned veteran of 40 years who had doubled for Clark Gable and John Wayne. He did not like Feldman, calling him the "meanest goddamn little kid" he'd ever dealt with. When it came time to film the famous scene near the end when Jason reaches through a broken window to pull Tommy out of a house, White got to act out his frustration. They had worked out the timing of when White would grab Feldman beforehand, but during filming White waited a couple of beats to the point that Feldman assumed the stunt had gone wrong. So, just as he let his guard down White grabbed him exactly as you see in the film, meaning Feldman's screams of horror were completely authentic.
  • Lawrence Monoson decided to actually smoke pot when his character, Ted, is supposed to be smoking pot prior to this death. Instead of helping him get into the character, the pot mostly rendered Monoson incapable of concentrating on his scene as he became paranoid and freaked out on set.
  • Rob's death scene is one of the most unintentionally hilarious in series history, as his response to Jason's knife repeatedly entering his body is to scream, "He's killing me! He's killing me!" as Trish continues fleeing. Who would really respond like that? Well, as it turns out that was inspired by a newspaper article Joseph Zito read about a stabbing incident on a New York City street in which the victim screamed, "Please stop hurting me, please stop killing me!" yet no one nearby intervened or called the police. The idea was for Rob's screams to highlight how merciless Jason was, killing a rather noble character who not only sought justified vengeance but was also the love interest for Trish. Thus, Trish can hear exactly what is happening and either rush to Rob's aid or flee, but instead she initially runs away only to return due to overwhelming guilt.
  • The actual ending of Final Chapter closes with an appropriately brutal death for Jason, as his head slowly descends down an upturned blade. However, series tradition dictated they needed a fake-out dream sequence conclusion. They filmed one, and then scrapped it, thus meaning the official version of Final Chapter never does reveal what became of Trish and Tommy's mother, whose death is implied but never depicted. Thanks to the recent efforts of documentarian Daniel Farrands and Joseph Zito, this original ending has been restored as much as possible, the deleted scene reminded people way too much of the first and third's endings. The sixth movie did finally settled this, with the Sheriff saying she was indeed killed by Jason.
  • This is the only Friday the 13th film in the franchise to have the main group of teenagers all murdered.
  • The first of two 'Friday the 13th' movies that feature Jason in which he doesn't use a machete to kill anyone, the other being Jason Goes to Hell: The Final Friday (1993).
  • Chronologically, parts 2, 3, and 4 take place over the course of 5 days, from Friday the 13th to Tuesday the 17th. During that time Jason kills 34 people.
  • When Tommy goes up to shave his head you can see he has a lot of hair to cut and shave. There is too little time to have elapsed to get it done and see his sister again.
  • This is the only Friday the 13th movie where Jason actually dies.
  • Early in the film, Tommy's mom tells him that he needs a haircut. Tommy ends up shaving his head in the climax.
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