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Eraserhead

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Movie Info & Cast

Synopsis

This surreal nightmare examines male paranoia. Our hero and title character, Henry, faces a number of horrifying obstacles in meeting someone of the opposite sex, meeting her parents, and procreating. Produced during a one-and-a-half-year period while director David Lynch was a student at the American Film Institute, the film launched him as a major new talent admired by cinephiles and filmmakers all over the world. It stands today as a milestone in personal, independent filmmaking.

Cast

  • Jack Nance
  • Charlotte Stewart
  • Allen Joseph
  • Jeanne Bates
  • Judith Roberts
  • Laurel Near
  • V. Phipps-Wilson
  • Jack Fisk
  • Jean Lange
  • Thomas Coulson

Did You Know?

Trivia

  • There is no dialogue for the first 10 1/2 minutes of this movie as for last 20-30 minutes.
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Goofs

  • Henry takes off the wrong shoe/sock to dry off.
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Quotes

    • Mary X: You wouldn't mind marrying me, would you Henry?
    • Henry Spencer: Well... No.
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Atom User Reviews

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Metacritic

100

What makes Eraserhead great-and still, perhaps the best of all Lynch's films? Intensity. Nightmare clarity. And perhaps also it's the single-mindedness of its vision; Lynch's complete control over this material, where, working on a shoestring, he served as director, producer, writer, editor and sound designer.

Metacritic review by Michael Wilmington
Michael Wilmington
Chicago Tribune
100

Eraserhead is an extraordinarily raw film that’s not so much an announcement of its filmmaker’s obsessions, but a complete, intimate, and heartbreaking fulfillment of them.

Metacritic review by Chuck Bowen
Chuck Bowen
Slant Magazine
100

Here was a film that took elements that one might have encountered in other movies in the past—black humor, gore, surrealism, erotic imagery, gorgeous black-and-white cinematography and oddball performances—and presented them in such a unique and deeply personal manner that the end result was something that literally looked, sounded and felt like nothing that had ever come before it.

Metacritic review by Peter Sobczynski
Peter Sobczynski
RogerEbert.com