The Revenant Movie Poster

Goofs from The Revenant

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  • The ruined church shown in the dream sequence as constructed is clearly an Orthodox church based on the architectural style of what remains of the building, primarily the nave and iconostasis. The wall in front of the nave is covered with icons on both sides. However, behind this wall in the center is a crucifixion painting rendered in the style of early Renaissance. Such a "modern" painting would never be included with the rest of the icons which usually display the Prophets, Apostles, or Christ Enthroned in Byzantium style.
  • Several times during the movie characters have the frizzen, which makes the spark in a flintlock, open. The gun will not fire in this condition. More importantly, this opens the pan which holds the priming powder. This means the priming powder can be easily dumped onto the ground, rendering the firearms useless.
  • It's winter time and Hugh Glass spends a lot of time in and out of very cold water. At one point, he takes an extended trip down stream with most of his body under water (at times, he is completely submerged). While he might have survived a bear mauling, it is very unlikely that Glass could have survived hypothermia emerging from cold water to freezing or near freezing temperatures.
  • When Fitzgerald and Bridger return to camp and are being paid for staying behind with Hugh Glass, the captain offers Bridger an amount of money for his efforts even though he gave his original share to Fitzgerald. In this scene, Captain Henry is shown placing the money on the table in front of Bridger. Bridger then gets up and storms out without taking the money he was offered. The money is clearly shown left on the table when he leaves, but in the next cut back to that part of the table the money is no longer there.
  • When Glass traps and captures a fish and raises the fish to his mouth to take a bite out of it, you can see that the fish has been gutted.
  • Glass wakes up in the early morning when the Arikara Indians try to ambush him. He shoots one Indian then he takes his shoulder-bag over his neck and starts running towards his horse. He runs in front of a tree (scene cut here!), falls off and you can see that when he stands up he does not wear his shoulder-bag any more while jumping on his horse. In the next scene he is wearing his shoulder-bag again while riding on his horse.
  • At the start when Glass finishes urinating, he clearly zips up his trousers. The film takes place in 1823 and the earliest zipper-like design was patented in 1851.
  • You can see a 'chopper' making waves on the river water when Glass escapes from the Indians by diving into the river.
  • At the beginning of the movie, Hugh Glass broke his ankle, but it healed over the course of the movie. At one point, his ankle was even twisted backwards. A normal healing would take months.
  • When Bridger and Fitzgerald are exploring the village when a massacre occurred, wild boars run among them. Wild boars are native to Eurasia and northern Africa. Although pigs were brought to the American continent, the introduction of wild boars in America occurred in New Hampshire in 1890.
  • Throughout the movie you will hear Green frogs and Pickerel frogs vocalizing in the background. Both of these species range in the eastern United States/southeast Canada and therefore would never be heard in the North American Rockies. Not to mention, frogs are not active and do not call in winter.
  • As the Native American starts to leave the bison carcass, you see he has left his arrows in the wolves. He would never do that. It's so labor intensive to make arrows, arrowheads, and fletchings, that he would pick them out of the carcasses and reuse them.
  • When Hikuc speaks to Glass about also losing his family, his vocals do not match his lip movement, and appears to be dubbed.
  • Glass is attacked by a grizzly bear with her two cubs. But the film is set at a time of year when a grizzly bear (especially a mother bear with cubs) would be in hibernation: early- to mid-winter. We know this is the time of year because of the weather, and the drinking scene midway through the film, when Captain Henry says to Fitzgerald, "Happy New Year." The real-life Hugh Glass was mauled by a mother bear around May, 1823 - a time of year when bears are far less likely to be in hibernation.
  • Although Glass had no knife, his mustache (and only his) remains perfectly trimmed throughout his ordeal.
  • When it is clear that Leonardo DiCaprio is floating down the rapids, and not a stunt double, the background reveals that these shots were done at another time of year. There is no snow and the forests in the far background are bright green. The one scene showing him in the river in the winter is as he's climbing out.
  • When Glass escapes the Indians by floating down the river, the river is first clear of ice and running through a snow free area. Soon after, when Glass climbs out, the river is full of broken ice and running through snow covered terrain. Whilst is possible that his journey in the river could have taken him to a different area with snow, it's unlikely that the river would also become full of floating ice in such a short time.
  • A fierce storm rises just before the Indian tucks Glass in a makeshift tent to heal. No branch of the trees in that patch of wood ever moves.
  • After the initial mauling, Glass attempts to retrieve his flintlock rifle from the the ground to get a shot at the bear. You can see that the frizzen is open. Any powder that was in the pan would have spilled unto the ground thus making the gun inoperable. Nevertheless, he manages to get a shot off.
  • When Glass gets back on his horse after finding Fitzgerald's tracks he clearly kicks the other horse behind in the head.
  • When Glass is tracking Fitzgerald through a pine woods, the trees are in nice neat lines. It's obviously shot in managed woodland and not the wilderness. The idea of conservation and managing woodland in the US didn't begin until almost 1900.
  • Fitzgerald uses a term "Texas ranger" in one of his monologues. The very first time the term "ranger" was used was in 1823 by Stephen Austin, according to the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame website, and at the time Austin called for "ten men...to act as rangers for the common defense..." The website continues, "But not until November 24, 1835, did Texas lawmakers institute a specific force known as the Texas Rangers." Therefore, Fitzgerald could not have referred to such an organization.
  • Glass, while recovering from his wounds, has a couple dream sequences. One of the images he recalls is a memory of seeing a huge pile of animal skulls during his time in the wilderness. Humans hunting wildlife to this degree (and piling up their skull bones) didn't occur in the 1820's. It happened later in the 19th Century American West, with the resultant near-extinction of the Plains buffalo herds.
  • The bows that are used by the Indians look to be made out of fragile sections of cane. They don't look to be capable of driving arrows to such distances and power as shown in the movie.
  • When Fitzgerald and Bridger return to camp and are being paid for staying behind with Hugh Glass, the captain pays them in dollar bills. There was no paper money in 1823 and the 2 would have been paid in coin. While paper money did exist at the time, bills were referred to as "treasury notes" and were only issued on special occasions. Due to the Panic of 1819, many banks in the US refused to issue coinage and insisted on distributing these treasury notes to be drawn on gold or silver bullion held in bank vaults. While one might assume most people might insist on hard currency, in actuality, on the frontier and in remote outposts, specie would have been very difficult to come by, and very few merchants would be able to make change for gold or silver coins.
  • Glass is on the riverbank, trying to start a small fire so he can cauterize his open neck wound. He uses two pieces of metal to create a spark and ignite the grass tangle; the camera briefly pans up, so the ignition source is not seen. The small fire ignites off-camera, likely with the help of a crew member's lighter or matchstick.
  • The makeshift tent where Glass is placed to heal is just a stone's throw away from where the Indian is hanged by the French and their camp, however it seems that Glass was not bothered by them at all.
  • When Glass and Fitzgerald fight near the river, after Fitzgerald's fingers are cut off there are several noticeable blood drops that splatter the upper right corner of the camera lens which appear on the screen briefly. However, the blood disappears during the single continuous shot, revealing it to be an post-processing effect. This is in keeping with similar effects in the film such as the camera lens fogging up as if breathed upon.
  • When Glass crawls to the first river for water he acts as if he is about to die of thirst but when opening his canteen water runs out as if already full.
  • Many of the profane trappers use modern-day slang terms.
  • When the buffalo-sharing Indian builds a makeshift tepee for Glass to spend the night, the wind blows fiercely at ground level but the trees are nearly still. A wind machine was clearly used.
  • Fitzgerald and Bridger pick up horses at the massacred Indian village. But when they ride into the settlement, these Indian horses inexplicably have saddles.
  • At the beginning of the Arikawa attack, a naked man named Colter runs in to the camp. John Colter had been captured by the Blackfoot in 1809 and forced to run for his life. He died on either May 1812, or November 1813. The Hugh Glass incident occurs in 1823.
  • When Elk Bear was lynched his hair was long and full, but when he was with Hugh Glass it was very thin, stringy, and short.
  • The grove of trees where Hugh Glass slept in the healing sweat enclosure was very thinly planted and easy to walk through. At other times it was difficult to get through the tightness of the trees or see through the thicket.
  • When Fitzgerald shoots the dead Captain Henry off the horse, Henry falls off the left of the horse. When Fitzgerald approaches the body, who he thinks is Glass, the body clearly has fallen off the right side of the horse.
  • Two times Hugh Glass shoots his single-shot flintlock pistol twice in rapid succession without reloading it or having any time to do so. Loading these pistols is fairly time-consuming - requiring the shooter to point the pistol upward, pour gunpowder down the barrel, then insert a lead ball with a cloth patch around it, ram it down with a ramrod, pour priming powder into the pan, close the frizzen, and cock the hammer. He does this when he steals a horse from the french, and again when the Indians attack him shortly after this. An experienced shooter could do this fairly quickly, and maybe take a shortcut or two, but in both these instances the movie depicts him firing the pistol, then immediately jumping on a horse and shooting someone else with the pistol only seconds later.
  • Around 00:57:06, Bridger's hairs are dry. Around 00:57:23, he's always laying down and his hairs are wet and covered by snow.
  • When the search party is looking for who they believe could be Hawk, they hear a close gunshot directly in front. It's night time and they are carrying torches when the search party and Glass approach each other. Behind Glass there are several torches that can be seen. There wasn't enough time for party members to circle in behind him not to mention they would have been in the line of fire if there was a problem.
  • A Pawnee is accompanied by a voiceover in Inupiak. Inupiak is spoken in Arctic Alaska only, and comes from a different language family than Pawnee.
  • At the end of the movie when Glass grabs Fitzgerald's throat and face (before pushing him into the river), the false teeth in Tom Hardy's mouth are dislodged and caught on the side of his facial hair.
  • The large snail used as a model image for carving the canteen is a nonnative apple snail. These nonnative apple snails have only recently been introduced into the southern U.S. and definitely would not have occurred in the n. United States.
  • DeCaprio spends a lot of time calmly swimming in very icy-cold water.
  • Two or more of the characters converse loudly, even while being pursued, near the beginning of the movie.

Spoilers

  • In the end scene when the Indians on horses cross Glass who is sitting down in the snow near the stream, Glass' hair is unkempt and is over is face - the scene cuts to the Indian woman, and when it cuts back to Glass, his hair is parted in the middle - fairly neatly.
  • When Glass is laying wounded on his makeshift gurney a couple nights after the bear attack, he is looking up at the moon, which is in First Quarter. The next night, it is in Waxing Crescent, not consistent with natural moon cycle. Later, when Fitzgerald and Bridger are eating, a foggy night moon is visible, almost full. Two nights later, as Glass rests on the riverbank, the moon is in first quarter again.
  • When Glass is resting his head on his dead son, you can see his son's eyelids moving.
  • The deep wound in Glass's neck (which is later shown to have caused an opening in his throat) would, in fact, not have allowed him to continue breathing during Fitzgerald's initial attempt to suffocate him, for few reasons. First, his wound was filled with blood (as show in later scene(s)), and secondly there were quite a lot of leather and cloth wrapped around Glass when Fitzgerald was suffocating him, thus preventing any air flow through his throat.
  • When Glass crawls out of his "grave", Bridger's canteen falls off his chest. The next morning, he has it around his neck.
  • When Glass places moss on his dead son's lips they clearly move as if they were still warm. A dead body's lips in frigid temperatures would be immovable.
  • In the dead horse scene, the innards are placed by the back end of horse. In another angle, they are by the head.
  • It is suggested that when Glass emerges naked from the gut of the dead horse, his coat and pants would be stiff and frozen as they have been left outside in sub-freezing temperatures, but it is later clearly seen that there are from few to several degrees above freezing, since water is dripping from the trees and snow is melting. It would just require few shakes from Glass to get the frost off and the clothes would then be just cold and wet.
  • When Glass is shown in his grave, he has dirt covering his face and inside his mouth. But when he emerges seconds later, his formerly filthy teeth are sparkling clean.
  • In reality Fitzgerald and Bridger helped Glass in killing the bear although later abandoning him. Glass never killed Fitzgerald who had enlisted in the army. Glass was later killed by Arikara Indians in an attack in 1833 at Yellowstone River.
  • Near the end of the film and after Glass encounters the body of Henry, there is a close up of Glass and Henry showing Henry's scalped head. When the camera zooms back out in the background can be seen an avalanche. If you listen just before the camera zooms back out one can hear the charge used to create this avalanche.
  • When Glass takes the pouch from his son's neck, his son's neck moves freely. His son has been dead for a considerable amount of time and has been laying on frozen ground. His neck would be stiff.
  • When Glass and the Captain identify Fitzgerald's tracks in the fairly deep snowfield, they take their horses into fresh snow to follow, instead of simply tracking in the trail already made by Fitzgerald's horse.
  • When Fitzgerald shoots the already-dead Henry off the horse, his rifle is pointing far to the right of the actual target. This is somewhat common in movies where the camera angle and shooter's line of sight don't match.
  • Andrew Henry didn't actually die in real life as portrayed in the film. He actually died nine years afterwards in 1832.
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