The Irishman Movie Poster

Trivia for The Irishman

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  • As of May 15th, 2016, STX Entertainment bought the international distribution rights of the film. After this, the project was green-lit to start production. Scorsese pitched the project as far back as 2007.
  • At one point, it was conceived as being a two-part film.
  • Filming began in August 2017.
  • This is the first feature film directed by Martin Scorsese to star Robert De Niro since Casino (1995).
  • Joe Pesci's first film appearance since his voice role in Savva. Serdtse voina (2015) and first on-screen film appearance since Love Ranch (2010).
  • The sixth film where Martin Scorsese directs Harvey Keitel, after Who's That Knocking at My Door (1967), Mean Streets (1973), Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (1974), Taxi Driver (1976), and The Last Temptation of Christ (1988).
  • This is the ninth feature film collaboration between Director Martin Scorsese and Robert De Niro, with their prior films being: Mean Streets (1973), Taxi Driver (1976), New York, New York (1977), Raging Bull (1980), The King of Comedy (1982), Goodfellas (1990), Cape Fear (1991), and Casino (1995). However, this is the tenth film collaboration if one takes into account the short film The Audition (2015).
  • The seventh film featuring Robert De Niro and Joe Pesci. The others being Raging Bull (1980), Once Upon a Time in America (1984), Goodfellas (1990), Casino (1995), A Bronx Tale (1993), and The Good Shepherd (2006).
  • The fourth feature collaboration between Martin Scorsese and Mexican cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto, after The Wolf of Wall Street (2013), The Audition (2015), and Silence (2016).
  • The budget was set at one hundred million dollars.
  • A relatively new production company, STX, secured international rights on the movie. They are a young studio focused on making mid-budget, adult-targeted, star-powered films, which include: The Gift (2015), The Boy (2016), and Hardcore Henry (2015).
  • According to Deadline, the movie has been in development since 2010.
  • According to Robert De Niro, the movie will use The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008) style effects to make him and other cast members look younger during flashback scenes.
  • Ray Liotta expressed interest in playing a role in the movie.
  • Robert De Niro and Al Pacino both appeared in The Godfather: Part II (1974), Heat (1995), and Righteous Kill (2008).
  • When asked during an interview with Cinema Blend about how the film would handle the age difference between the actors and characters, producer Gastón Pavlovich stated, "You don't use prosthetics, make-up; they have acting, and the technology is able to have them go through different time ages without the prosthetics. So, we've seen some tests and it looks extraordinary. We were able to film Bob (Robert De Niro) and just do a scene, we saw it come down to when he was like twenty, forty, sixty, so we're looking forward to that, from that point of view, for The Irishman. Imagine seeing what De Niro looked like in The Godfather: Part II (1974) days, that's pretty much how you're going to see him again." The technology will be utilized for the other cast members in the film.
  • This is Martin Scorsese's 26th full-length theatrical feature film.
  • Production was initially split between Paramount Pictures (which was planning to release it domestically), Media Asia (which picked up Chinese distribution), and STX Entertainment (which took international rights). After studio chief Brad Grey left, Paramount lost confidence in the film's $100 million budget. The film went into turnaround, and Netflix acquired the rights.
  • This is the fourth time Martin Scorsese has directed Robert De Niro and Joe Pesci, after Raging Bull (1980), Goodfellas (1990), and Casino (1995).
  • During an interview with The Playlist, Martin Scorsese teased that this would be different from his other gangster films, saying "I think this is different, I think it is. I admit that there are, you know, Goodfellas (1990) and Casino (1995) have a certain style that I created for them, it's on the page in the script actually. Putting Goodfellas (1990) together was almost like an afterthought, at times he was kind of rushing, he felt I'd already done it because he'd played it all out in terms of the camera moves and the editing and that sort of thing. The style of the picture, the cuts, the freeze-frames, all of this was planned way in advance, but here, it's a little different. The people are also older in The Irishman (2018), it's certainly more about looking back, a retrospective, so to speak, of man's life, and the choices that he's had to make."
  • Robert De Niro said that the film represents "unfinished business" between Martin Scorsese and him.
  • Third collaboration between Martin Scorsese and Bobby Cannavale. The others being Boardwalk Empire (2010) and Vinyl (2016).
  • In addition to their close call on Goodfellas (1990), Al Pacino was almost directed by Martin Scorsese when Francis Ford Coppola, a fellow apprentice to Roger Corman, suggested he direct The Godfather: Part II (1974) after seeing Mean Streets (1973). Paramount Pictures head Robert Evans, however, felt Scorsese was not experienced enough for the job and preferred that Coppola direct.
  • This is the first film Martin Scorsese and Joe Pesci have collaborated on together without the late Frank Vincent.
  • According to Deadline, before accepting the role of Russell Bufalino, Joe Pesci refused multiple times to come out of retirement in order to appear in this film. Some sources say the actual number of refusals was fifty.
  • British actor Stephen Graham previously worked with Martin Scorsese and Steve Zaillian on Gangs of New York (2002).
  • The cast includes four Oscar winners: Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Anna Paquin and Joe Pesci; and one Oscar nominee: Harvey Keitel.
  • Casino (1995) was the last Martin Scorsese directed film in which Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci and Frank Vincent appeared.
  • Joseph Russo played Joe Pesci in Jersey Boys (2014).
  • Frank Sheeran measured in at 6'4", almost 6" taller than the man portraying him, Robert De Niro. Some techniques like "forced perspective" and shoe lifts helped maintain the illusion of Sheeran's hulking frame. Similar techniques were used in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1994), for the titular character also portrayed by Robert De Niro.
  • Alan King's character Andy Stone in Martin Scorsese's Casino (1995) was based on real-life Teamsters member Allan Dorfman, who is portrayed by Jake Hoffman in the film.
  • New Jersey native comedian Jim Norton plays the late great comedian Don Rickles. Rickles himself played a supporting role in Casino (1995), the previous collaboration between Scorsese, Pesci, and De Niro.
  • The Irishman wrapped filming on March 5, 2018.
  • As of March 2018, it was reported that the budget for "The Irishman" had escalated to $175m.
  • Al Pacino said that, to him, the process of filming The Irishman was how it felt filming movies in the 1970s.
  • The Irishman took 106 days to film. This is the longest shooting schedule in Martin Scorsese's career.
  • Robert De Niro wanted the film to retain the same title as the book, "I Heard You Paint Houses".
  • Special effects titan Industrial Light and Magic is providing the work to de-age the actors. According to Al Pacino, there would be computers on the camera sides during production to track and follow the cast. Pacino said that he'd be playing Hoffa at different ages (39 or 48), so, when told that his performance was to be at that age, he'd refer to a memory around that time and try to physically and mentally perform as if he were that age.
  • While filming The Irishman, Martin Scorsese turned seventy-five years old. To celebrate his seventy-fifth birthday he received a large birthday cake with a picture of his face on it. His cake was also lined with cupcakes.
  • At least 10 of the actors and actresses have played alongside each other several times in the hit HBO show Boardwalk Empire.
  • This is Martin Scorsese's first film for Netflix despite being vehemently opposed to watching feature films on a TV screen. However, some Netflix films do get a limited theatrical release.
  • Robert De Niro refers to himself as "The Irishman" in two scenes in Goodfellas (1990).
  • The film marks the first partnership between Al Pacino and Martin Scorsese.
  • The second film to feature Martin Scorsese and Robert De Niro of the 21st Century after Shark Tale (2004).
  • Sebastian Maniscalco was given the option to either fly out to New York City or send a tape from Los Angeles where he resides. Maniscalco opted to buy his own ticket and fly out to audition and meet with the filmmakers. The casting director saw him and said that he was looking good for the movie, particularly since Scorsese was a fan of the comedian's work. Maniscalco said that actually killed his confidence for the audition and it went sour. They subsequently gave him notes and a second chance and he succeeded, although he was cast for a different character than the one he read for.
  • Comedian Sebastian Maniscalco was originally envisoned for the part of Skinny Razor. Upon meeting Maniscalco, Scorsese saw a darker edge to the comedian and offered him a more sinister part as Crazy Joe Gallo. Maniscalco accepted the role and Bobby Cannavalle took the role of Skinny Razor.
  • It is rumored the first cut of The Irishman (2019) exceeded 4 hours running time.
  • This is the first motion picture that actors Craig Vincent and Harvey Keitel have ever appeared in together. Keitel's wife Daphna Kastner directed Vincent in her 1995 film French Exit (1995)
  • The second collaboration between Anna Paquin and Harvey Keitel. They previously appeared together in The Piano (1993).
  • "I heard you paint houses" were the first words Jimmy Hoffa ever spoke to Frank "The Irishman" Sheeran. On The Tonight Show, Robert De Niro remarked that the term, along with "I also do my own carpentry work," refer to both the hit and the clean-up.
  • According to an article in Iohud by Karen Roberts published on Friday, September 22, 2017, walking down Lafayette Avenue in Suffern on Thursday was like stepping back in time into the New York of the 1960s and 70s. The filming had closed a stretch of downtown Suffern on Lafayette between Chestnut and Orange Avenues between 11:a.m. and 3 p.m. The film crew had dressed the exteriors of store windows to look like the time period the story was set in. Crews had also been filming in Blauvelt and Ardsley on Wednesday and various other locations around the Lower Hudson Valley.
  • Two of this film's stars have portrayed Al Capone: Robert De Niro in the film The Untouchables (1987) and Stephen Graham in the television series Boardwalk Empire (2010). In addition, Al Pacino starred in the movie Scarface (1983), which was a remake of the movie Scarface (1932), which was heavily inspired by the life of Al Capone.
  • Was originally set to have a wide theatrical release (being the first Netflix original film to do so). However, in August of 2019, it was announced that Netflix canceled the theatrical release, much to the chagrin of Scorsese fans. However it still received limited theatrical release in select theaters, and played at a majority of Alamo Drafthouses.
  • The film was shot primarily on 35 mm film.
  • Bobby Cannavale, Ray Romano, Paul Ben-Victor, J.C. MacKenzie, and Bo Dietl previously worked together on the television show Vinyl (2016).
  • At three hours and thirty minutes, this is the longest film Martin Scorsese has directed, and the longest mainstream film released in over twenty years.
  • Scorsese's longest feature film yet. Clocking in at exactly 3 1/2 hours and surpassing his previous 3-hour film, The Wolf of Wall Street.
  • First time Harvey Keitel has appeared in a Martin Scorsese film in over 30 years. Their last effort was "The Last Temptation of Christ" (1988).
  • Mickey Rourke claimed Scorsese wanted him to appear in the movie, but that Robert De Niro refused to work with him as a result of a feud between himself and Rourke that stretched back to Angel Heart (1987) where the two co-starred together. In a statement to Entertainment Tonight, Irishman producers Jane Rosenthal and Emma Tillinger Koskoff and casting director Ellen Lewis said that Rourke was mistaken, and that he was never attached to the film. "Mickey Rourke was never asked to be in The Irishman nor was he ever even thought of, discussed, or considered to be in the movie," the statement read.
  • This epic production comprised 9 cameras, 309 scenes, 117 locations, and 108 shooting days, occasionally necessitating as many as three company moves in a single day.
  • According to De Niro, director Scorsese had approached him for an entirely different "aging hitman" project, for which he then read the book on the Irishman as research. He subsequently convinced Scorsese they should do that story instead. (Source: Appearance on the Graham Norton Show)
  • Martin Scorsese has predicted that due to the success of the de-aging ("youthification") process used extensively on his film, the need for makeup in the future may be drastically reduced. For the three leads in their seventies, the director had insisted that there be no stand-ins, no green screen, and no image/performance-capture with its requisite bulky headgear. Digital de-aging was what he settled for ultimately, a process that was executed here in a manner that had never been done quite this way previously.
  • Martin Scorsese has said that he couldn't get a Hollywood studio to back his epic mob movie, claiming nobody was interested in making a film with him and Robert De Niro anymore. Fortunately Netflix CEO Ted Sarandos ultimately stepped behind the production with a proposed budget of $160 million and the film was finally greenlit.
  • Director Martin Scorsese shares his birthday, November 17, with actor/director Danny DeVito, who directed the film Hoffa in 1992.
  • It has been widely reported that Joe Pesci was asked around 50 times to appear in this film before finally agreeing. According to Martin Scorsese the number was actually much higher.
  • Netflix's financial backing of this project has had some serious side effects with regards to its theatrical release. Due to Netflix's demands that the film be available on home streaming 30 days after the theatrical release, almost all of the major cinema chains in the U.S., Europe, and many other territories were unwilling to show it, as this breaks the minimum 90-day theatre to home viewing "gentleman's agreement" that the cinema chains and distributors have been working with for years. The major chains--like AMC in the U.S., Hoyts in Australia, Event in New Zealand, and Odeon and Cineworld in the U.K.-- did not believe that they would have sufficient time to recoup their outlay. In many countries, the film has been shown theatrically only by small, independent cinemas and art house chains (such as Curzon in the UK). While the big chains have previously snubbed certain films for various reasons--and thus seriously hurt their box office potential--this is probably the most high profile and critically lauded film to which this has happened.
  • Stephen Graham was extremely nervous during the scene in which he and Al Pacino debate how late his character was for a meeting. Stephen thought, 'I'm in a scene with Robert De Niro and he says nothing. Shit!' This led him to improvise in another take the line 'What do you think Frank?' to Robert De Niro's character. Much to Stephen's delight, De Niro improvised the line, '12 and a half.'
  • The word "fuck" and all permutations of it are used 136 times. This marks the sixth film directed by Martin Scorsese to contain more than 100 uses of the word after "Raging Bull" (114 uses), "Goodfellas" (300 uses), "Casino" (422 uses), "The Departed" (237 uses) and "The Wolf of Wall Street" (569 uses).
  • The song that plays in the background during Russ's and Frank's conversation about Frank's tour in WWII in Sicily, sounds like The Godfather Waltz. De Niro plays the young Vito Corleone, who is also from Sicily, in The Godfather Saga. But actually the song is "Le Grisbi", by the French harmonica player Jean Wetzel.
  • Martin Scoresese pointed out that while the senior actors were digitally de-aged in their faces (and in some cases aged) there was still the challenge of acting physically younger (or older) in their posture, gait, and energy level. Scorsese claimed that attention was always paid to the characters' exact age in every scene, including subtle changes of only a few years.
  • Martin Scorsese claimed that for one shot of Jimmy Hoffa getting out of his chair, he had to reluctantly ask 78-year-old Pacino for another take, since Pacino's rise from the chair was a bit too noticeably stiff for Hoffa's age of 47 in the scene. Pacino performed the scene again and quipped "62!" Scorsese has said that a unique 'posture coach' - uncredited Gary Tacon - was on set for much of the shoot to monitor the physicality of the older stars portraying themselves as younger men.
  • Ray Romano and Robert De Niro have a previous mutual co-star in Peter Boyle. Romano and Boyle played father and son in 'Everybody Loves Raymond'. Boyle and De Niro worked together on 'Taxi Driver' (1976).
  • Joseph 'Crazy Joe' Gallo is seen entering the club Copacabana. This location is also featured in Scorsese's Goodfellas and Raging Bull.
  • At one point in the film Joe Pesci's character instructs Frank to meet with "a fairy named Ferrie." This is a reference to David Ferrie, who some believe had a hand in both the Bay of Pigs invasion and JFK's assassination. Pesci played David Ferrie in Oliver Stone's film JFK (1991).
  • Although Robert De Niro (an American of Italian / Irish ancestry) was always Scorsese's first choice for the role, when Scorsese originally proposed this project to Paramount, both Liam Neeson and Pierce Brosnan (both of whom are actually Irish born) were briefly considered as alternative choices in case De Niro was either not available or was asked to take the role of Russell Buffalino after Joe Pesci initially proved reluctant. Although both Neeson and Brosnan are about a decade younger than De Niro, and Neeson had a closer physical resemblance to the real-life Frank Sheeran, Scorsese had doubts about whether he could convincingly pull off the accent consistently. Brosnan was also contemplated, but it is believed he was not contacted as, by then, Pesci finally agreed to play the role of Russell meaning that alternative choices were no longer required.
  • As depicted in the film, both Joe Pesci and Robert De Niro can speak Italian.
  • Jonathan Morris was a real-life Catholic priest before leaving the priesthood in 2019.
  • The house that appears at the beginning of the film is the same house that appears in Goodfellas (1990).
  • Steve Witting, who plays Judge William Miller, played the role of Elliot Cookson in Hoffa (1992), a film about Jimmy Hoffa.
  • Four actors from Entourage are in The Irishman: Vince's accountant Marv, WB studio boss Alan, Dom and Martin Scorsese who played himself.
  • Martin Scorsese and editor Thelma Schoonmaker's collaboration goes way back to 1967 and Scorsese's Who's That Knocking at My Door (1967). They have worked together on most of Scorsese's films, totaling 24 movies including The Irishman (2019) (without short films and documentaries). Schoonmaker won Academy Awards for Scorsese's 'Raging Bull', 'The Aviator' and 'The Departed'.
  • Hotel Deauville, in the scene of the Teamsters' Miami Beach convention, is better known as the hotel where The Beatles performed during their second appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show on February 16, 1964.
  • The 2nd collaboration between Robert De Niro (Frank Sheeran) and Katherine Narducci (Carrie Bufalino) since "A Bronx Tale" in which they play husband and wife. In this film she plays Joe Pesci's (Russell Bufalino) wife. Joe Pesci was also in the film "A Bronx Tale".
  • When Frank Sheeran says, "Three can keep a secret, if two of them are dead," he is quoting Benjamin Franklin.
  • At 209 minutes this is Martin Scorsese's longest-ever film.
  • This is the first time Al Pacino worked with either Martin Scorsese or Joe Pesci on a film.
  • This is the third film in which Al Pacino and Robert De Niro appeared together in the same scenes. The first two films are Heat (1995) and Righteous Kill (2008). They also starred in The Godfather: Part II (1974) but never appeared in any scenes together.
  • The priest baptizing the infant at the 11:50 mark is a real Catholic priest Fr. James Martin S.J.
  • There's a lot of driving in "The Irishman," but nobody wears a seat belt.
  • Martin Scorsese and Robert De Niro didn't want the de aging process to be obtrusive, or even require using headgear and face-tracking dots, so this primary concern was brought up by Scorsese to ILM visual effects supervisor Pablo Helman during a Thanksgiving dinner while filming Scorsese's previous film, Silence. In order to have the film given the green light for production, Helman spent ten weeks working on his proof of concept de-aging idea by having Scorsese and De Niro re-enacting the Christmas party scene from their earlier film, Goodfellas. Next, Helman developed a rig called by the crew as a three-head monster which consists of a main Red film camera and two mini-Alexa cameras that served as witness cameras to capture infrared versions of the images and the necessary volumetric information. Originally weighed at 38 kilos / 84 pounds, Arri managed to reduce it to 29 kilos / 64 pounds while making it wide up to 30 inches. The software used for de-aging actors, called FLUX, took two years to develop. It required building a virtual library that stores images of De Niro with other actors like Joe Pesci, Al Pacino and those who had to play younger versions of themselves from their early 40s until to their 60s. An artificial intelligence system was also developed in parallel to allow the system to take any frame they made and scour the full image library in an instant to give them reference images of what the actor should look like.
  • Martin Scorsese wanted the film's look to resemble a memory and a home movie but without the shakiness and the grain of a 8mm camera. Director of photography Rodrigo Prieto used four different looks (via different look up tables) for different periods of time, which according to him, the 1950s had the Kodachrome look; the 60s had the Ektachrome look; the 70s had a some small silver layer, the 1980s until the present day mimicked the ENR silver retention process with a more desaturated look. Prieto added that only the present day scenes were shot on film camera as it only required slight further aging makeup for the actors.
  • One reason why Martin Scorsese cast Anna Paquin for the role of the adult Peggy was because of her skill in non-verbal communication. Scorsese had known her since he produced Margaret (2011), in which she starred. Based on that ability, Scorsese decided to have her role a near-silent one and asked screenwriter Steven Zaillian to layer Peggy within the story. Scorsese remarked: "You see your father do something like that, I'm sorry... You see him crush the guy's hand like that... other kids maybe, but this kid couldn't take it. She looks at him. She knows he's up to something and Lucy [Gallina] was great, but Anna ultimately was amazing in the looks. She has one line in the film. There's something you can't talk about. She knows it. She knows who he is. He knows she knows. Even when she's sitting there and the police are talking about Joey Gallo being [murdered.] [The anchor said], 'A lone gunman walked in...' and you see she's looking at him."
  • A musical version of Jerry Vale's "Pretend You Don't See Her, My Heart" is played as couples are dancing during Frank's award banquet at an upscale venue. The vocal version is played while Henry has taken Karen to an upscale club during their courtship in "GoodFellas".
  • In the sequence leading up to Hoffa's speech in Miami, Scorsese employs a tracking shot across the water and on to a hotel, which is the same shot that was used to open The Jackie Gleason Show (1966), and Scorsese uses the same music, "Melancholy Serenade", that opened the Gleason show; a tune composed by Gleason. The Gleason show was filmed in Miami.
  • Stephen Graham came up with the idea of swatting Jimmy Hoffa's ice cream off the table before going into their fight scene. Graham warned Scorsese and the crew what he was going to do so no one would be hit by the dish, but wanted to surprise Pacino. Pacino's startled reaction was genuine. He afterwards complimented Graham for successfully surprising him.
  • According to Charles Brandt's book, Russell Buffalino's favorite song was Jerry Vale's Spanish Eyes. That song is heard and performed in The Irishman.
  • This is the second Martin Scorsese film to have Johnnie Ray's "Cry" in the soundtrack, the first being Shutter Island (2010).
  • The scene in the nightclub where Jimmy Hoffa is seen walking over to Angelo Bruno to say hello marks the first time Al Pacino and Harvey Keitel have ever appeared in the same frame together in any movie.
  • Martin Scorsese's first introduction to the story occurred when Robert De Niro gave him Charles Brandt's 2004 book "I Heard You Paint Houses." De Niro had first received the book from screenwriter Eric Roth, who had written De Niro's directorial The Good Shepherd (2006).
  • The "Youthification" process was first demonstrated for Martin Scorsese by visual effects technician Pablo Helman using footage of Robert De Niro from Goodfellas (1990).
  • This is the second movie directed by Martin Scorsese to receive 10 Academy Award nominations, and not win in any category. The first one is Gangs of New York (2002).
  • A movie marquee seen in the background advertises Don Siegel's 1976 western, "The Shootist," John Wayne's final film in which he portrays the last days of a ruthless gunslinger, somewhat similar to DeNiro's gangster cinema legacy and portrayal of Frank Sheeran.
  • Robert DeNiro, Joe Pesci, and Harvey Keitel have all worked for Martin Scorsese before, and De Niro's collaborations with Scorsese have almost always involved one of the other two actors. However, this is the first time Pesci and Keitel have appeared together in a film. Pesci and De Niro's previous film with Scorsese, Goodfellas, featured Keitel's then-wife, Lorraine Bracco.
  • Robert De Niro was executive producer of the television series NYC 22. Frank Whaley made a guest appearance on that show. He also played Hoffa's unnamed assassin in the film Hoffa.
  • For this film, Thelma Schoonmaker became the oldest person to receive an Oscar nomination for Best Editing, at age 80. The record was previously held by Dede Allen, who was nominated for Wonder Boys (2000) at age 78.
  • Al Pacino received an Oscar nomination for playing Jimmy Hoffa in this film. Jack Nicholson received a Razzie nomination for the same role in Hoffa (1992), making Jimmy Hoffa one of the few roles for which an actor has received both an Oscar and a Razzie nomination.

Spoilers

  • In 2003, while on his deathbed, Frank "The Irishman" Sheeran revealed that he killed Jimmy Hoffa, stating that it was really hard on him, because Hoffa was his good friend, but "it was business". This has yet to be confirmed as a fact by the authorities.
  • Harvard law professor Jack Goldsmith (stepson of "Chuckie" O'Brien, played by Jesse Plemons) wrote a book titled "In Hoffa's Shadow" that appeared around the time of the film's release. Goldsmith is scathing about the reliability of Charles Brandt's book, which the film uses as source material, noting how many contradictory versions of Jimmy Hoffa's death Frank Sheeran told towards the end of his life.
  • In the confession scene, De Niro changed his line from "Who does that to a friend?" to "Who makes that call?"
  • From the moment Frank heads to Detroit to kill Jimmy Hoffa to the moment Russ Buffalino gives Frank his sunglasses back when he returns via private jet, there is no background music.
  • In the opening sequence of the film, when Frank Sheeran's character is narrating in/from the retirement home, when he first talks about "painting houses...myself" and there is a quick cut of a panning shot of Sheeran executing someone with a gunshot to the back of the head. It's actually a breadcrumb of the climactic murder scene: The flash panning shot lasts less than a second (00:02:09) and is intentionally blurry, except for a select few frames, but pause at (00:02:09.6) and the still-frame will show the 'big reveal' that Sheeran's introductory murder victim here is actually Jimmy Hoffa, who is also the first character to mention "painting houses" in a dialogue scene to Sheeran, and ultimately becomes Sheeran's climactic murder victim of this movie.
  • The plane shown as The Irishman's charter from Port Clinton to Detroit (Pontiac) is a Cessna 421C. These were not certified until October 1975, after the disappearance of Jimmy Hoffa earlier that year.
  • Anna Paquin only has 3 lines of dialogue.
  • Aside from an early flashback to executing German prisoners in World War 2, Frank murders three people in the film. Each murder is followed by a scene between Frank and Peggy, with Frank either reading or watching media coverage of the murder.
  • Joey Gallo's death was immortalized in Bob Dylan's 1976 song "Joey" from his album Desire. In 2019, the same year this film was released, Martin Scorsese also directed a documentary about the tour in support of Desire, entitled Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story by Martin Scorsese. Like The Irishman, the Dylan documentary also received much attention over the controversy regarding veracity of the events depicted in the film.
  • In the final scene of the film, Frank's priest informs him that he will be out of town for the next few days, due to an upcoming Christmas holiday. The real Frank Sheeran died 11 days before Christmas 2003, suggesting that this scene occurs on one of the last nights of Sheeran's life.
  • Martin Scorsese claimed that for the scene depicting Hoffa's murder he deliberately changed the art direction in mid-scene for the last shot of Jimmy Hoffa's dead body, placing the camera in an unrealistically wide angle of the room by removing a wall, to give the moment the feel of a stage play.
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