The Invisible Man Movie Poster

Trivia for The Invisible Man

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  • Armie Hammer and Alexander Skarsgård were the studio's top choices for the titular role.
  • David S. Goyer was hired to write the screenplay in early 2007. Goyer remained attached to the project as late as 2011 with little to no development on the film.
  • The film was originally going to be a part of the Dark Universe, with Johnny Depp starring as the titular character, and Ed Solomon writing the screenplay, but changes were made to the Dark Universe to focus on individual storytelling and moving on from the shared universe concept after the box office failure of The Mummy (2017), which itself was an attempt to reboot the Dark Universe after the box office disappointment of Dracula Untold (2014).
  • The second Universal Monsters Remake to receive an R rating after The Wolfman (2010).
  • Cecilia's job interviewer is played by Benedict Hardie, who also appeared in Leigh Whannell's previous movie Upgrade (2018).
  • The first name of the main character, Cecilia, is derived from the Latin Caecus which means blind or eyeless, Appropriately, she cannot see the Invisible Man. She is frequently called 'C' in the film, which, obviously, is pronounced like 'see.'
  • No actors' names appear at the beginning of the film.
  • Due to the closure of movie theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, Universal announced that the movie will be available to rent from Friday 20th March 2020 with 48-hour viewing windows for $19.99.
  • There are a number of references to "invisible people" watching in the background of scenes. The coat at the front door, the hat and coat Invisible Man throwback in Cecilia's bedroom, and a man-shaped silhouette behind James in Griffin's office, to name a few. This can also reference Oliver Jackson-Cohen's Hill House series, where the protagonists were often being watched from the shadows.
  • Early in her career, Elisabeth Moss voiced the character of Kimmy Ventrix in See No Evil (1993), in which her character's father spends time with her using an invisibility suit. Her invisibility suit-clad father is also the antagonist, whom his wife is trying to get away from.
  • Leigh Whannell lost "a little bit" of interest in seeing movies in theaters because audiences have become too brazen in their chatting and phone use during the film, but "having said all that I'm going to talk over this entire movie."
  • As a fan of opening title sequences Leigh Whannell wanted this film to feature titles that are simple yet still speak volumes about the film itself. The one here -- waves crashing against the rocks briefly showing the titles before they drips away -- came to him on-set, and he soon discovered that water is the most difficult thing to get right with CG.
  • The film starts with a close-up of Cecilia's (Elisabeth Moss) face as she opens her eyes "which is important!" Whannell adds that it will pay off "much later."
  • The opening sequence originally had original music written for it, but Whannell and the sound design team felt it worked better with silence and the sound of the crashing waves.
  • Whannell enjoys weaponizing an audience's knowledge of movies against them, and the opening sequence is filled with examples where viewers expect things that don't happen. This includes everything from mirror scares to Adrian's (Oliver Jackson-Cohen) eyes opening.
  • The house interiors are made up of four different actual houses. Adrian's bedroom, for example, is actually a living room in a house in Sydney.
  • Leigh Whannell chose not to have an opening establishing Cecilia's predicament with Adrian "because I wanted to just drop the audience into Cecilia's situation without any back story and make them feel everything through her, and luckily I had Elisabeth Moss who is very good at communicating a lot to the audience without saying anything."
  • Pine trees aren't native to Australia, which is where the movie was filmed, so the sequence where Cecilia runs into the night amid the pine trees was actually shot at a plantation where they're grown for furniture and Christmas trees. "If the sun was up you would see that these pine trees are planted in really neat rows, not natural at all."
  • Whannell chooses this commentary to admit to Elizabeth Moss that the plantation was filled with funnel web spiders. "But you didn't get bitten, so I'm assuming now it's not a litigious thing. You're fine. Maybe one hitched a ride in your suitcase, and you've now introduced funnel web spiders to North America. That's gonna be bad, Lizzie."
  • Finding Australian locations that could pass for the United States seemed easy on paper, "but life is not lived on paper, my friends" Whannell stated. James' (Aldis Hodge) suburban house was especially difficult to find. "Everything in Australia is subtly different," he says adding that they even had to have a mailbox sent over from the US.
  • "Not only is Aldis a very handsome fellow, he's also one of the nicest people I've ever met." In the film's audio commentary, Leigh Whannell lists Hodge's numerous attributes including his talent, his intelligence, his technical illustrations of his own watch designs, and more. "I'm just going to list off his good qualities until everyone listening to this commentary realizes that it's really unfair the whole Aldis Hodge situation. Nobody is supposed to be that perfect in real life. And I'm angry about it."
  • Cecilia's sister, Emily (Harriet Dyer), was referred to as Alice in numerous reviews for the film, and Whannell doesn't know why or where that came from."It's a mystery on the same level as Jack the Ripper as far as I'm concerned."
  • Leigh Whannell suggests that tip one in making a great movie is to cast amazing actors. "I discovered on the set that great actors can improve the script so much."
  • The kitchen table scene, around the 16:20 mark, was originally ten minutes longer "because I had written so much dialogue," says Leigh Whannell. He discovered while working with editor Andy Canny that the actors were so good that much of the dialogue became unnecessary. Of Canny he says, "he's Australian so he's not afraid to tell me exactly what he thinks."
  • The character of Adrian's brother, Tom (Michael Dorman), is meant to feel as if nothing about him fits, and that's made literal in his costume. His suits are a couple sizes too small to complete that subtle image, and Dorman loved it.
  • Whannell likes to think about the "cinematic language" of a film while writing the script, and for this movie that meant thinking about what the camera is doing that could be unique. "What I decided is that the camera should move away from the actors as if it had a mind of its own, as if it knew more than the characters did."
  • The locked wide shot starting at 25:31 led to some crew members questioning Whannell's lack of coverage, but he thinks filmmakers should stick to their guns if they have a plan and a vision. "You have to lean into what's different about your project." This shot is him suggesting that there's someone in the room that we can't see.
  • The bedroom scene starting at 32:04 with Cecilia and Sydney (Storm Reid) sleeping was a pick-up shot filmed in Toronto after wrapping in Australia, meaning the set decoration had to be shipped to Canada. The first test screening led Jason Blum to ask if Whannell wanted to do any re-shoots. Whannell's response was to redo the sequence where Cecilia wakes up to the pictures being taken while she slept - the original version is glimpsed in the original trailer showing the phone floating in the air - "but I felt that the scene could be more tense."
  • Whannell suffers from crew jealousy when his associates move on to other projects. "I don't want to see my ex-girlfriend having brunch with her new boyfriend, thank you very much."
  • The scene where Cecilia goes for the job interview features two callbacks of sorts to Whannell's previous film, Upgrade (2018). Benedict Hardie plays the architect after playing Fisk in the earlier film. And second, Whannell's wanted to lock the camera to Moss when she faints which is a similar technique used in Upgrade. The problem, though, was that they didn't have the same camera rig, so they had to do it analog style with cinematographer Stefan Duscio simply moving in sync with her to the floor.
  • The post-shower sequence originally included a shot of a hand print on the shower door, (the very shot used in both the trailer and the Blu-ray/DVD cover art) but they removed it as he felt Cecilia's discovery of the pill bottle was chilling enough.
  • Whannell worked with extremely talented actors before, "but working with Elisabeth Moss was just a revelation for me. She can do anything."
  • Whannell had told Duscio that this horror movie would feature plenty of light as an invisible man doesn't need to hide in the darkness, "and he kind of groaned with pain" because cinematographers love darkness. The attic scene is a "little gift" that he gave to Duscio, and they lit it with just that flashlight.
  • The attic scene originally saw Cecilia finding more than just the phone, knife, and portfolio: "she found food that he'd been eating, she found a little stack of her clothes including her underwear," and some of it is still visible in the corner at 55:01 and in the shot that follows.
  • "Nor did I have any idea that this scene you're watching right now would be so goddamn difficult," Leigh Whannell says at the start of the epic kitchen fight sequence. It was the toughest scene to shoot due to choreography, motion control camera use, having to paint out the guy in the green full-body suit, digitally recreating some of Moss's limbs, and stunt work. He thanks Moss, the fx company Cutting Edge, the stunt people, and more.
  • "I thought everybody would be so freaked out by this driver taking so long to do this turn," Leigh Whannell says of the Uber driver who collects Cecilia, "and nobody really was."
  • The shot of the Golden Gate Bridge at (1:01:34) is real, but the focus car is CG. The following shot is again a real landscape and road but with a CG car.
  • The shot at (1:03:04), is a little nod to Heat (1995) Leigh Whannell appreciates Michael Mann's "clean framing."
  • The amount of scenes featuring people talking led Whannell to worry more than once that this was turning into "a Sundance movie about two people having a disagreement" instead of a genre film designed to keep people engaged and thrilled.
  • Leigh Whannell resisted the urge to discuss supposed plot holes called out by some critics and adds that "I don't feel there's any plot holes in this movie. Well guess what critics, I've got it all worked out in my head, so everything makes sense to me. If it didn't make sense to you, too fucking bad!" These leads him to ponder whether the commentary is R-rated like the film itself.
  • The shot where Cecilia slices open her wrist with the pen is cut from the UK release as a graphic suicide attempt earns a film an 18 classification, the equivalent to an NC-17 in the US.
  • That's Nash Edgerton at (1:32:05) as one of the guards. He's a filmmaker in his own right (The Square, 2008) and emailed Whannell asking if he could visit the set "and die." .
  • While some people think the tracking shot into James' house around (1:35:10) is a POV of the invisible man it's actually following him meaning we're looking at his back. "But we can't see him."
  • Turns out fire extinguisher foam doesn't actually cling to people like it does in movies meaning they had to use some visual fx.
  • The scene where Cecilia calls Adrian was another pick-up shot in Toronto after production had already wrapped.
  • Whannell flew to London to film a single line of dialogue from Adrian, "it's the one where he says 'that shouldn't come as a surprise.'" He doesn't detail why, but the inference is that he felt it would help the film's coherence. Jackson-Cohen's face had changed slightly, so they had to use digital touch-ups to match it.
  • Elisabeth Moss' character is thrown across the dining-room table by the monster. Nailing this shot wasn't easy. It involved two stunt performers, one of whom was in a green suit; various ropes; a VFX team; and the precise movements of a robotic, motion-controlled camera.
  • They used a robotic camera rig that could be programmed to shoot each take with the exact same timing and movement. This allowed them to capture both the take with the stuntman and one clean take without him. Editors could then merge the two shots and digitally erase him afterwards.
  • For the kitchen scene First, they would film Moss as she was about to be thrown. Then they would swap her out with a stuntwoman. She would be attached to a rope for support, and the stuntman in the green suit would throw her across the table. They would swap in Moss again and stitch the three shots together, removing the stuntman and rope from the clip.
  • Removing an actor in a green suit was difficult to do perfectly with so many moving parts. They also digitally reconstructed some of the background to make the final shot cleaner. Director Leigh Whannell said in an interview with The Big Picture podcast, "it's actually easier to add in a werewolf later than it is to subtract a stunt performer in a green suit." By rendering him completely invisible, it was up to the audience to guess where he was, without a floating hat or sunglasses to guide them. When he made himself known through violence, it felt more like a real person was actually there attacking. Not every scene required an actor in a green suit, and some of the most tension-filled moments are ambiguous ones, when the audience doesn't know if the Invisible Man is there or not.
  • One way they made the invisible man seem so real without using any VFX was through frequent, calculated panning shots. In most films the camera pans to a specific character or object to focus the audience's attention. The other key to making the cinematography scary was to use the negative space. They filmed lots of empty spaces where the character might be, even though you can't actually see him, and the audience is never quite sure. Much of this was accomplished through unusual framing, leaving extra space around or behind Cecilia. The viewer assumes he's standing in the corner or sitting in the chair, which makes the audience uneasy. For example, in the interrogation scene the corner of the room is bare and in frame, so Cecilia and the audience assume he's standing right there in the shot, listening to everything. One of the kitchen scenes is a wide still shot. It lingers there for a long time after Cecilia leaves the frame. This was intended to be a moment for the audience to frantically search the image for any signs of him. Whannell says he wanted you to be afraid you would miss something. The director confirmed that the invisible man is in most of those shots, but only he knows exactly which ones. There are only a few where the character is not present where we think he might be.
  • Whannell and his crew used a combination of old-school techniques and state-of-the-art CGI wizardry to bring the Invisible Man to life, with some scenes requiring a fully-green-suited actor that could be painted out later and others achieved with nothing more than a simple bit of string. "Well with, say, the fight scenes, that was a real mixture of things," Whannell said. "We had Lizzie being pulled around in wires. We had a stunt person in a green suit, who then had to be removed digitally. "But then also in those scenes we would also use really old school practical effects like pulling doors closed with a piece of string. Some props guy would be hidden in a cabinet, and he would pull this piece of string and a door would close or a cabinet would open. It made you realise that how you do a visual effect doesn't matter - it's only the end result that matters."
  • According to Leigh Whannell "You know I learned that on Paranormal Activity, the first Paranormal Activity," producer Jason Blum agreed, noting with some irony that the Invisible Man was the "perfect" monster for the smaller-budgeted films created by Blumhouse Productions. "The effects of Paranormal Activity were all done by [director] Oren and his neighbour. And it's as scary a movie as there's ever been! I really internalised those lessons. Simple is generally scarier."
  • Often Elisabeth Moss was just emoting to an empty room with no-one to bounce off, though for certain scenes she insisted that co-star Jackson-Cohen be present to help lend authenticity to the performance. "Leigh and I were trying to be specific about when it could be the stunt double, when it could be Olly, when it should be nothing," Moss explained. "And we tried to really make sure there was specificity there. And there were times when if the Invisible Man had to speak in the scene, I would prefer to have Olly there. And then there were times when there was nobody there at all and it was just a blank space." "I'm there more than you would think," Jackson-Cohen, who only physically appears briefly in the movie, said. "We're trying to be quite selective about where we say parts of it are me or not, because we kind of want to keep an audience guessing as to how we did it. But it was definitely not I didn't shoot for like four days on the movie. I was there for two months. So it was a fair amount. Lizzie and I spent some time discussing what parts of the script she really needed me to be there, and we felt would help performance-wise. So, yeah. Slip me into a green suit and I'm a go." However, Moss admitted Jackson-Cohen didn't need to be on set quite as often as he was. "The non-serious answer is then I just started asking Olly to come to set to entertain me, and to amuse me," she laughed. "I just thought it was funny to look at. There's nothing like a tall man in a tight green-screen suit."
  • A big challenge came in how to communicate that the Invisible Man was actually there. For Whannell, this ended up being one of the key struggles in making the film work. He attempted to achieve the effect through a combination of slow, roving camera angles (implied to be from the Invisible Man's perspective), ingenious sound design, and Moss's performance, alongside carefully-implemented special effects. "I wanted this character to be a real presence in the movie without being seen," Whannell says. "So the question becomes, how do you make someone's presence in a movie feel very heavy and real without showing them? Do you use music? I guess in the case of Jaws, that music tells us the shark is there. Even though we don't see the shark, we hear the music. But I didn't necessarily wanna do that. I didn't want to have a theme song that would come on. So I don't know if I really succeeded, but at every step of the way I was trying to suggest the presence of somebody, without explicitly saying there's someone here." It's somewhat ironic that the most complicated CGI work in the film is to hide the monster from the audience, rather than add in a terrifying creature. "Painting out the green suit is quite a difficult process," Whannell admitted. "That was the hardest thing to do. It actually proved to be harder than we thought!" "Removing the Invisible Man was actually quite complicated," Blum agreed. "But look, the scariest movies don't have a lot of special effects. And of all the monsters, the one that needs the least effects is clearly The Invisible Man. In movies you can throw a lot of money at crazy effects, make a crazy-looking monster or whatever. I think keep writing and keep pushing the character and the story and the performance, and your choice of actors. Those things are much more important for a good movie than big production value, I think."
  • On February 22, 2020, during an interview with Cinemablend's ReelBlend Podcast, Whannell stated that the film was never planned to be part of any cinematic universe, including the Dark Universe. He stated, "It was weird, this film came about in a really random way. It wasn't like I was plugged into some kind of worldbuilding. I had just finished Upgrade, they called me in for a meeting with some of these Universal and Blumhouse execs I go to this meeting, and they didn't really talk about Upgrade. I mean, they said they liked it and they moved on. So, I'm sitting on this couch thinking, 'What am I here for? What is this meeting about?' And they started talking about The Invisible Man."
  • The location of Adrian's house is 3333 Celestial Drive.
  • The shock collar device that Cecilia takes off of Zeus and puts in her bag is presumably the way that Adrian tracked her, because the letter about his passing was in the mail box before her sister even arrived to tell her of his passing.
  • Adrian comes from either the Latin word "Adru" which means "sea" or "water" (you can see right through water) or 'Atur' which means "black" or "dark" (referring to his motives; black is also associated with death) the name could also be derived from the name 'Hadrian', which was also the name of a Roman emperor who ruled from the late 1st century AD- 2nd century A.D.
  • When Cecilia is escaping in the beginning she's wearing a Cal Poly Architecture sweater. Later in the movie she interviews for a job at an architectural firm. The characters have fitting career choices for their roles in the story. Architecture represents privacy; it's the idea of putting up walls and shielding yourself from the outside world. Optics technology represents an invasion of privacy. People like Adrian are the suppliers for paparazzi and technology companies are seen as leeches for data and are often criticized for their misleading privacy policies.
  • At one point James wears a shirt that reads, 'Prestige Records 1949', a reference to the release date of The Invisible Man Appears, which was a Japanese adaption of HG Wells novel: The Invisible Man, which is what the original film is based on.
  • The blanket pulling scene pays homage to The Conjuring (2013).
  • When Cecilia spreads coffee beans all over the floor to try to catch the Invisible Man footsteps it's very reminiscent of Paranormal Activity, when Katie spreads flour on the floor to try to record the invisible entitys footsteps. And also similar to Hollow Man (2000) when Sarah throws blood on the floor to try to catch Sebastian's footsteps.
  • When the first trailer debuted, many were angry that it appeared to spoil the entire movie. Happily, many have now confirmed that the trailer was misleading and there were many twists left unspoiled. Jason Blum even admitted he was pushing for more to be revealed and is very happy the director wouldn't let him.
  • Quite a few people refused to ever watch the film because of how terrifying the setup is, even if they were reasonably sure Cecilia would come out on top. Some actual abuse victims even said their PTSD was triggered by the trailer alone. Indeed when removing the horror element, the film strictly comes off as an abuse victim being tormented by their old abusive ex partner.
  • Elisabeth Moss says she 'would be 100% into' making a sequel to 'The Invisible Man' "I would be 100% into continuing to tell that story," she told Insider while promoting her upcoming movie, "Shirley." "There's definitely something to do there with her." The movie's director Leigh Whannell has said he hasn't put any thought into a sequel. However, with Moss voicing her interest it's possible a sequel could materialize in the future.
  • In the 1933 film's sequel The Invisible Man Returns, Griffin's brother is named Frank. Here, he is named Tom (a reference to the character Thomas Marvel, Griffin's assistant, from the original novel.
  • While the Griffin of the original movie is portrayed sympathetically, his book counterpart is a villain protagonist who used his condition for thievery and slowly lost his mind when he was unable to become visible again. This incarnation of him has Griffin as an outright antagonist being an unrepentant, abusive sociopath
  • Cecilia makes her escape from the home by using Adrian's passwords for the home security system, as being lovers the likelihood of that is plausible. Adrian later uses Cecilia's e-mail account to send hurtful messages to Emily, likely because of the same thing.
  • While the 2020 version of "The Invisible Man" features a much more empowering ending for Cecilia, the man in bandages is a subtle nod to the movie's history and an indication that things are going to get a lot more violent before they can get better
  • All of the exterior shots of Adrian's home were filmed at a place well-known to Sydneysiders: Headland House. Designed by Atelier Andy Carson, Headland House is an ambitious example of modern architecture that sits atop the southern coast of Werri Beach. Protruding pavillions rest above a stone-clad bottom floor. Angled beams secure these extensions, which come together to form a u-shape around a patio equipped with a pool and fire pit. While a gorgeous modern farmhouse, the place takes on an ominous tone in the film. Many of the interior shots in Adrian's home were filmed in Kiama at a mansion known as Pepple Cove Farm. Inside, the home feels cold and mechanical, an extension of the business all of Adrian's wealth and status resides in. While on the exterior Headland House is an eerie domicile, its interior is full of light and open space, thanks to its large windows.
  • One interesting feature of Adrian's house - which makes it both modern and terrifying - is its abundance of reflective surfaces. In the tense opening scene of The Invisible Man, Cecilia creeps through the home while Adrian sleeps after being drugged with Diazepam. Cecilia sneaks through each successive room toward her freedom, catching herself in mirrors, metallic surfaces, and matte walls.
  • The tone of the entire film is muffled, an expression of Cecilia's circumstances. From the black aluminum siding on the exterior to the earthy tones inside, Adrian's home also fits this color scheme. British actor Oliver Jackson-Cohen, previously known for his role in Netflix's The Haunting of Hell House, is the specter who controls every aspect of Cecilia's life. The prison-like tint of his home showcases this.
  • Along the wall behind Cecilia in the lab stand four mannequins in military tactical gear. These figurines hint at the threat to come by showcasing the technology Adrian uses to keep Cecilia under his control.
  • The pen that Cecilia stabs Adrian with is a Sheaffer Sagaris fluted gold.
  • Adrian's car in his garage is a 2015 Audi R8 5.2 FSI quattro [Typ 4S]. he also has two motorcycles, a 2009 Yamaha VMX 1700 V-Max and a 2012 Ducati Diavel.
  • The password at Adrian's door it's 1933, that was the year when the original film was released.
  • One reason why Cecilia sometimes feels like such a cipher is because even she herself might not even know who she is anymore. Trauma can make you feel like whoever you once we're, that person has now been erased. You have no life outside your struggle for survival.
  • Emily is never seen comforting her sister, most of their conversations quickly turn to bickering and most tragically of all when strange things start happening Emily doesn't take her sisters concerns seriously. One possible interpretation of their dynamic is that it's solely a necessary plot device in order for the horror of the film to function. Also long before Cecilia escaped from Adrian, she and Emily were already estranged. The way Adrian drives a wedge between Cecilia and her sister is by sending a fake email telling Emily that Cecilia wishes she was dead causing Emily to cut Cecilia out of her life. Cecilia denies that she sent the email but Emily refuses to listen, if the email was a wildly out of character thing for Cecilia to say you'd think that Emily would consider the possibility that she didn't have the full picture and she'd listen to Cecilia's explanation. Emily's reaction only makes sense if there was already some underlying tension between the sisters that Adrian was exploiting. We never get the full story about the reason for this tension but some old wound is undeniably there.
  • One of the reasons why the film was critically well-received was because it succeeds on numerous different levels simultaneously. It's not just a vehicle for scares. It's also a film with a brain full of deeper themes about trauma and abuse. What exactly is a trying to say about these subjects, first in regards to trauma the film shows us that even when the source of your pain is gone trauma stays with you like an invisible monster. this is the case for Cecilia even before the invisible man comes back into her life, she's afraid to leave the house, she has trouble sleeping, and she jumps at shadows. Metaphorically Cecilia's tormentor is a personification of trauma, an invisible force that stands at the foot of her bed at night, follows her down the street and pulls her away from her friends and family. In regards to abuse, The Invisible Man shows us that when people come forward and claim that they're being abused, people tend not to believe them, they downplay their stories, invalidate your feelings, and call them 'crazy'., Everyone in the film does this to Cecilia at some point even her sister her friends. the film is a reminder that just because we can't see the people around us being abused, that doesn't mean it isn't happening.
  • The shock collar on Zeus is called, "ElectriK9".
  • Zeus is a Doberman Pinscher mix.

Spoilers

  • EASTER EGG - When Ceci is in the Hospital and sees a patient is staring at her, being brought out on a stretcher, his whole head is bandaged up apart from his eyes. This aesthetic of the bandaged head is a reference to the original design of the Invisible Man's costumed disguise in the original series from 1933-1951.
  • EASTER EGG - When Ceci is in bed asleep and Adrian is taking photos of her, upon waking she looks up and sees a hat and trench coat on a stand. This is a throwback to the original design of the Invisible Man's costumed disguise in the original series from 1933-1951.
  • On the hospital wall is a poster which shows two black figures but one of them has pieces missing, this is foreshadowing what the invisible man will look like once his suit is damaged by Ceci.
  • Cecilia accuses Adrian's brother of being just the "jellyfish" version of him. Later when James' daughter is attacked by Adrian's brother, she's wearing a blue t-shirt with a red jellyfish on it, this indicating that it's not Adrian but his brother who's wearing the suit.
  • The film solves the biggest problem with previous versions of the story. Due to how the biology of the human eye works, if all the cells in a person were see-through the person would be unable to see. Changing the invisibility to a suit, similar to the alien from Predator (1987), works around this common issue.
  • The outside wall of the mental institution has a graffiti piece depicting Billy the Puppet, the doll the Jigsaw Killer uses in Saw (2004). Director Leigh Whannell wrote and starred in Saw (2004).
  • Leigh Whannell discovered through reviews that the film is a nightmare for trypophobics -- people who have a fear of closely-packed holes -- as the invisibility suit terrifies or disgusts them. "That's not something I was planning for."
  • The real invisibility suit is actually very difficult to fold up, so the shots of Cecilia carrying it is actually Moss just holding a balled up wet-suit with a bit of the dotted texture draped across it.
  • The restaurant scene is "notorious" and surprisingly "brutal" by design. Whannell wanted the audience to be caught off guard and accomplishes that with bright lights, a crowded locale, and the sister's warming relationship. He doesn't explain how Adrian gets Cecilia to catch the knife though.
  • Whannell had hoped that movie audiences would cheer when Cecilia stabs the invisible man with the pen, but while he was too lazy to attend every screening of the film, he didn't hear it at the ones he made it it to. "If you heard a theater cheer during that scene please tweet me @LWhannell and let me know about the cheering," he posted on Twitter.
  • When the Invisible Man attacks James and Sydney, his suit, which was previously flickering between invisible and visible after Cecilia stabbed him with a pen, doesn't malfunction. It's the final sign that it's not Adrian in the suit and really Tom having taken his place. Presumably it's a different suit. From the same moment as above, Sydney is wearing a shirt with a picture of a jellyfish on it. This ties in to Cecilia's earlier description of Tom as a "jellyfish" and foreshadows the fact that her attacker is Tom, and not Adrian.
  • In the aforementioned prison scene, Tom makes note of Cecilia making a bank account for a friend, which is information he could not have possibly have known unless he was getting fed information from someone spying on her. He reveals his and Adrian's true motives just a few minutes later. In the same scene, there's a poster with two figures standing back to back, one being broken up and fading, with the caption "YOU DON'T HAVE TO FACE YOURSELF ALONE" right behind Tom, indicating that he's working with Adrian and further foreshadows him donning an invisible suit later.
  • Cecilia gets the letter for Adrian's will reading at James's house, a location that no one knows that she's staying at. Which further highlights Adrian's fake-suicide plan as a drastic method to flush out Cecilia's hiding place - he most likely was tracking Emily when she went to James's house to break the suicide news to Cecilia, which makes the scene more tragically ironic as Cecilia told Emily specifically not to visit her as Adrian could be watching.
  • When Cecilia finds the phone in the attic with the text message "SURPRISE" on it, it has a mosaic background that looks just like the suit Adrian wears.
  • When Cecilia escapes from James' house, and takes an Uber to Adrian's house. Although they aren't followed by another car, and there's no clear way that anyone in the suit could have gotten in the Uber without either Cecilia or the driver knowing about it, somehow, there's already someone in the suit at the house when Cecilia gets there - something which would only be possible if there were two invisible men, one at James' and one at Adrian's. Zeus the dog barking madly at some invisible entity could be a tip-off that it's Tom, not Adrian attacking Cecilia. As Tom would be more of an intruder or stranger than Adrian. Since the film ends with Cecilia using the suit she hid during the incident to kill Adrian, it's highly likely that it was Tom that time; it would be very strange for Adrian not to realize that Cecilia had found and hidden the third suit, whereas the less competent Tom might. It's also easier to imagine the spineless Tom being intimidated by the dog and letting Cecilia get away, while Adrian has no qualms about fighting even while partially visible and clearly has no qualms about hurting a dog he fitted with a shock collar. There's a sinister footnote to that: Cecilia made the plans to meet Emily in a public place after her escape from Adrian's house, something Invisible Tom could not have overheard and even if he did, he couldn't catch up with her to do anything. Meaning Adrian was most likely watching Emily that entire time, lying in wait for Cecilia to contact her and for him to make his move.
  • How did Cecilia know for a certainty that Adrian really WAS the one behind it all, and not Tom as he claimed? There are two clear signs: after Cecilia stabbed him with the pen, Adrian's suit continuously glitches during the hospital scene, while Tom is wearing a suit that isn't glitching (and, just as importantly, doesn't appear to be even slightly wet, despite Adrian being drenched at the hospital); and Tom manages to somehow beat Cecilia back to James' house, not just by a little bit, but by a wide enough margin that he's able to attack Sydney, and then nearly beat James (who had to get from his precinct to his house after receiving Cecilia's warning call) to death, long before Cecilia arrived to save them both. This second point would only work if Tom was actually already at James' house beforehand, likely waiting for the go-ahead from his brother to kill Sydney. Likewise, the extra time would have allowed Adrian to return to his house, stow the suit, seal himself in the basement, and tie himself up before the police arrived. Another thing that's rather suspicious, is after Tom is killed, a police team enter Adrian's house, and Adrian is heard calling for help through the walls. Strange how nothing of the sort is heard earlier in the film, when Cecilia was snooping through.
  • Many people have noted that, were the literary version of Griffin to turn completely invisible, he would immediately go blind due to light not being able to hit his retinas. This version sidesteps that issue completely by making the method of invisibility a suit with hundreds of tiny cameras instead of a potion, which also allow the user to see inside the completely covered suit.
  • In the original 1933 film. The main character is also "invisible," and while they did use some practical effects to move objects around, for most of the movie, he's simply covered in bandages. The new movie couldn't rely on just hidden strings and bandages for a cheap scare. It shakes fans to the core by using innovative effects and smart filmmaking techniques to make the audience terrified of something they can't even see. An upgrade to a classic monster that is much more real and terrifying this time around. To create the illusion that Rains was invisible, the filmmakers wrapped parts of him in black velvet and filmed him in front of a black background. This made whatever part of his body that was supposed to be invisible seem to disappear. Otherwise, the rest of his clothes appeared to float in the air, a gimmicky look they tried to avoid in the new film. For the 2020 remake, they decided to make the invisible man, Adrian Griffin, completely invisible, making him a more mysterious and unknown figure. And thanks to technological advances in the decades between the two films, they could do it. But Elisabeth Moss and the rest of the cast still had to have something to react to. This required a stunt performer in a green suit. The stuntman would help guide the actors and interact with them for the fight scenes, like the one in the kitchen.
  • The design of the invisibility suits created by Adrian has it covered in countless different cameras, each of which resembles an eye. When someone's wearing them and the invisibility isn't turned on, they look like Argus Panoptes a many-eyed giant in Greek mythology. The figure is known for having generated the saying "the eyes of Argus", as in to be "followed by the eyes of Argus", or "trailed by" them, or "watched by" them.
  • A central theme of the film is to show how horrific controlling behavior can be, especially since it can and does occur in abusive relationships without any sci-fi invisibility suits required. Characteristic of an abusive lover, Adrian manipulates tiny, inconsequential things in Cecilia's life after becoming invisible to slowly make herself and those around her (as well as, to an extent, the viewer) doubt themselves until Cecilia is all but driven insane. All of this to drive Cecilia back into his arms. Although in a variation on the standard definition, he seems more interested in making her look crazy to everyone else than in convincing her she's crazy. There's even some fun wordplay involved: while he's invisible, Adrian manipulates Cecilia with gas (by heating a pan of bacon on the stove until it bursts into flames) and light (by turning the lights on and off). The likely reasoning for making others think Cecilia is crazy rather than have her thinking she's the one going crazy is so that once everyone else distances themselves from her, she'll be isolated, and will have no choice but to go back to Adrian, who'll be awaiting her return with open arms.
  • There's also one other weakness which, while never commented on, is still rather glaring - the suit's cameras make noise whenever they change focus, resulting in an insect-like chittering. In many scenes where the Invisible Man does not take obvious action, this is the only way to tell if he's in the scene.
  • During the final confrontation, Adrian makes reference to how their future lives together will feature "surprises", which is a nod to the single word text that he sent her when he was supposed to be dead.
  • There was a clue early on that there are two Invisible Men, when Sydney was sleeping and woke up and sprayed the Invisible Man she ran past him and another Invisible Man knocked her down from the front, so they were both there.
  • Another clue pertaining to when Cecilia got pregnant, is the placement of Adrian's hand on her belly when she executed her escape plan in the beginning. It works on initial viewing because it demonstrates his need to control her. Knowing that he already switched out her birth control pills, his hand on her stomach seems like an allusion to him already knowing she was pregnant or at least a strong possibility of it.
  • At the end, Adrian asks Cecilia if she wants pasta, sushi or steak. she chooses steak so she will have the knife in his hand to kill him.
  • The pattern on Adrian's phone, resembles the pattern of cameras on his invisibility suit.
  • When Cecilia dumps paint on Adrian from the attic, the texture or pattern on him is a hint that he's wearing some kind of suit as his method of invisibility.
  • The original version of the Invisible Man is nude when invisible. In this film, he has a suit that makes him invisible, keeping him clothed most of the time.
  • The film begins with Cecilia retrieving a duffel bag full of clothes from a hiding place and escaping from the house that she 'shares' with Adrian, fleeing into the night to escape his control. It ends with her returning to the house to win back control from Adrian, and killing him with the help of the invisibility suit she concealed in her original hiding place.
  • Various objects in James' house are quietly introduced in early scenes and brought back for pivotal scenes, including the ladder (used by Cecilia to climb into the attic and find Adrian's "lair"), paint cans (spilled on Adrian to reveal him for the first time), and the fire extinguisher and pepper spray (the former is used to expose Tom in the house attack and the latter is used to serve as a distraction and help Sydney get a head-start in her escape).
  • As Cecilia and her sister, Emily, sit in Tom's office to discuss her inheritance of Adrian's estate, Tom tries to read a letter to Cecilia from Adrian. Emily abruptly shuts him down, along with his insinuations that Cecilia is a gold-digger, by remarking that if they had to be "physically near" Adrian, they wouldn't be there at all. "You are physically near him," Tom remarks to their surprise, before pointing out the urn of Adrian's "ashes" right behind where they're sitting. Cecilia breathes a sigh of relief, but given that Adrian wasn't actually dead, Tom's comment about his nearness has more truth than they realize and is a pretty obvious clue to the later events of the film.
  • As the three are celebrating, Cecilia and Sydney playfully hit James with pillows, causing him to remark that "it's two against one." Even though it was likely just an off-the-cuff remark, it takes on a whole new meaning later in the film, when both Adrian and Tom team up to continue their torment of Cecilia by harming Sydney instead.
  • When Cecilia is disabling the house alarms and security cameras in Adrian's lab, she notices a strange empty room as she's on her way to freedom. At the time, she brushes it off and continues her escape, but later, returning to the house, she discovers that the empty space was actually home to another of Adrian's invisibility suits - meaning that her suspicions are correct and he is, in fact, alive and continuing to torment her. While it's eventually explained later on in the movie, this brief glimpse at Adrian's cutting-edge invention is a hint to viewers that there's more for Cecilia to uncover than meets the eye.
  • Cecilia's job interview at an architecture firm contains another seemingly innocuous moment that's a clue to the big finale later in the film. As she exchanges pleasantries with her interviewer, Cecilia mentions that she studied abroad in Paris and "lived in a broom closet" since she didn't have much money. The interviewer laughs, and tells Cecilia in response, "Seems like we both know the value of closet space." It's a pretty benign comment, but one that takes on a whole new meaning when you consider as she was planning her escape from Adrian, Cecilia hid her getaway bag (with clothes, money, and her passport) in a ventilation shaft in their closet. After she finds Adrian's second invisibility suit later in the film, she stashes it in the same spot, putting it on later to kill him over dinner. She really does know the importance of a good closet.
  • When Cecilia arrives to confront Adrian, who framed his own brother for all the mayhem he instigated after she left him, the house is immaculate and bright. One frightening sign of Adrian's compulsive need to manipulate his surroundings to his liking lies with the near-perfect arrangement of the dining room table. There isn't a utensil misplaced or a plate absent.
  • Throughout much of the film Adrian and his brother Tom appeared to be in a more or less equal partnership a unified front of awfulness. But occasionally we get hints that their relationship might be a lot more complicated. Tom asserts that Adrian held all the power in their relationship, saying "My brother controlled me long before he met you, Cecilia" after tom is killed however Adrian claims that the complete opposite is true, saying "I know it didn't seem like it to the outside world, but Tom controlled me" if both brothers claim that they were the abused and powerless party in a toxic relationship who should viewers believe the evidence points to Tom being subservient to Adrian and not the other way because when Tom visits Cecilia in the psych ward he tells her that they can get her out if she agrees to return to her life with Adrian. This ultimatum doesn't really make sense if Tom has the power and Adrian is just a puppet, it's also potentially true that both brothers are telling the truth at least in part, and they each abused one another at various times or perhaps both are lying and their claims of abuse exist solely to manipulate Cecilia's emotions. None of this justifies the way that either of them behaves.
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