The Favourite Movie Poster

Goofs from The Favourite

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  • Multiple closeup shots clearly show second and third holes in Emma Stone and Rachel Weisz's ear lobes. Multiple ear piercings were not common in the early 1700s, especially for English women at court.
  • Emma Stone's freckles come and go. In the period depicted, an upper-class woman wouldn't spend enough time in the sun to acquire freckles. However, Abigail had fallen on hard times prior to attending court. Since she worked as a domestic servant, she might well have been exposed to the sun long enough to develop freckles.
  • The phrase "prime minister" was first used to describe George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham (1592-1628), "favourite" of James I and Charles I. It did not mean what the modern office of Prime Minister has come to mean.
  • An upper-class person is described as "posh." According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the first recorded use of the word in that context was in 1914.
  • In the film, Robert Harley is a young man. In real life, he was 47-49 years old during this period. His youthful portrayal is probably inspired by William Pitt the Younger, who became Prime Minister at 24 in 1783.
  • Characters say "OK", an American expression first used more than 100 years later.
  • In one scene, a black woman is at court, wearing full aristocratic dress. There is no historical evidence to support black noblewomen present at any English court during this period. However, British merchants were heavily involved in the Atlantic slave trade. Before the UK outlawed slavery in 1772 (1834 in the colonies), most African slaves in the UK were domestic servants. The black woman in aristocratic dress could have been someone's slave.
  • Mascara was invented in 1913.

Spoilers

  • When Abigail is talking in her bedroom on her wedding night, a metal band is visible on her front teeth.
  • When Abigail burns Lady Sarah's letter to Queen Anne near the end of the movie, her drink changes from dark red to yellowish in the next shot.
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