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Rafiki

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Videos & Photos

  • Official Trailer

Movie Info & Cast

Synopsis

Bursting with the colorful street style & music of Nairobi's vibrant youth culture, RAFIKI is a tender love story between two young women in a country that still criminalizes homosexuality. Kena and Ziki have long been told that good Kenyan girls become good Kenyan wives - but they yearn for something more. Despite the political rivalry between their families, the girls encourage each other to pursue their dreams in a conservative society. When love blossoms between them, Kena and Ziki must choose between happiness and safety.

Cast

  • Samantha Mugatsia
  • Neville Misati
  • Nice Githinji
  • Charlie Karumi
  • Muthoni Gathecha
  • Vitalis Waweru
  • Sheila Munyiva
  • Mellen Aura
  • Leila Weema
  • Jimmy Gathu

Did You Know?

Trivia

  • It is inspired by Ugandan Monica Arac de Nyeko's 2007 Caine Prize-winning short story "Jambula Tree".
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Movie details provided by

Atom User Reviews

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Metacritic

70
May 19, 2018

Charismatic performances by Samantha Mugatsia and Sheila Munyiva make you believe in the characters and invest in the romance. When harsh reality inevitably intrudes on their dream love, the emotional impact is all the deeper.

Metacritic review by Allan Hunter
Allan Hunter
Screen International
60
May 19, 2018

Its simplistic observation of romantic love in its purest form colliding with political, religious, familial and societal intolerance seems designed to speak clearly to teenage audiences experiencing similar struggles between identity and oppression. Those well-meaning intentions only take the film so far, however, and mature audiences will be left wishing for greater narrative complexity.

Metacritic review by David Rooney
David Rooney
The Hollywood Reporter
65
May 19, 2018

If the film is uneven—with such an exuberant beginning and disappointingly rote climax—that may simply be because Kahiu wanted to communicate as many truths of her home country as she could.

Richard Lawson
Vanity Fair