Major League Movie Poster

Goofs from Major League

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  • For Serano's home run in the playoff game with the Yankees - in a portion of the shots the bat is perfectly clean and shiny and the next second it is dirty and does not look as though it has ever been cleaned.
  • Obvious stunt runner (longer hair) for Dorn as he rounds first base during the playoff game.
  • After Harris gives up the walk in the top of the 9th inning, the scoreboard shows 7 hits for the Yanks. Vaughn comes in and gets a strikeout. After Hayes gets a hit in the bottom of the 9th, the scoreboard shows 9 hits for the Yanks when, in fact, they only have 7.
  • When Dorn gets his hit in the 7th inning of the playoff game, he rounds first base and the first base coach is #2. When he gets back to the base Leach (the first base coach) is #16.
  • After Taylor grounds out in the 7th for 2 outs, Dorn singles and Cerano homers. The next hitter after that makes the third out of the inning. In the 8th, the Indians had to go 3 up and 3 down for the 9 man lineup to work. In the 9th, it is said that with one out Tomlinson flies out for the second out, bringing up Hayes with 2 down. However, under that scenario there are not enough batters in the order to make the necessary number of outs before Hayes comes up, as one batter before Hayes had to have made two outs. There are only 8 at bats between the same spot in the batting order. 7th inning single, homer, and 3rd out of inning; 8th inning 3 outs and 9th inning 2 outs. Hence, there should have been only one out when Hayes came to bat.
  • When Pedro Cerrano gets mad at Harris in the locker room, he shouts "¡Chíngate Cabrón!" Cerrano is supposed to be Cuban, but that expression is Mexican Spanish and rarely heard in Cuba.
  • In the final "bunt and steal" scene, after the signs have been given by Lou Brown and the base coach, Taylor is knocked down by an up and in fastball by the Duke. Hayes should have been running on the pitch as he would have assumed Taylor was bunting based on the signs. There's no way the signal would have included a "run on the 2nd pitch" instruction as Taylor already had one strike on him. Hayes steals on the next pitch and scores on Taylor's bunt single.
  • At the end, when the Yankees' first baseman is throwing home, the home plate umpire has no hat on. His hat is on in all other shots.
  • In the all-important bottom of the ninth inning, prior to Jake Taylor calling his shot, Willie Mays Hayes is at first. What probably is a hit-and-run play, Taylor swings and misses while Hayes is headed for second. As Hayes slides in to second you hear more than one person call "safe".
  • When the Indians are playing Oakland in the "national television" game and Mike Rexman (Oakland), is at the plate the sun angle changes drastically between when Jake goes out to talk to Rick Vaughn and the last pitch of the game.
  • After Vaughn strikes out Haywood to end the top of the 9th inning, the Yankees first base coach is still seen in the coach's box as the Indians enter their dugout to begin the bottom of the inning. In reality, the coach would have left the field right away.
  • When Dorn (#24) gets his hit in the 7th inning of the playoff game, the shot of the base runner rounding first base shows his number as #8, and the first base coach has #2. When his face is shown again, Dorn's number is back to #24, and the first base coach is shown to be wearing #16 in all other shots.
  • The necklace on Vaughn's chest as he's being kissed goodbye by Mrs. Suzanne Dorn moves between shots.
  • When the team is traveling on the team bus, the movie cuts twice to an outside shot of the moving bus. It is clear that the bus is empty.
  • In the final game against the Yanks, the # 37 player is hitting, Jake Taylor then throws to 1st base to pick off the #37 player. The #37 player appears later in the game, this time being referred to by a different name by Harry Doyle.
  • In the top of the 9th during the one game playoff against the Yankees, the stadium clock reads 10:20 PM as Vaughn is coming in from the bullpen. In the bottom of the 9th right as the Duke comes in from the bullpen, the stadium clock still reads 10:20 PM.
  • The Spring Training site for the Indians is in Tucson, Arizona, according to the advertisement on the taxi Jake Taylor gets out of. While it has since moved, this was correct at the time of the film.
  • In the last game against the Yankees, at "Two outs, top of the ninth, still tied at 2, Harris working on a 7-hitter" the local NBC station name is visible on the scoreboard over Harris' shoulder as WTMJ TV 4. WTMJ 4 is based out of Milwaukee. If it were Cleveland, it would read WKYC 3.
  • At the end of the movie, right after Willie Mays Hayes has been called safe at home, he jumps up and runs out to Jake Taylor, and as they celebrate, his batting helmet disappears and reappears between shots.
  • In the game against Oakland, when Rexman steps up to the plate, right after he hits the ball he drops the bat. In the next shot he has it in his hand again.
  • When Dorn throws out a Yankee to end the top of the first inning in the final game Harry Doyle (Bob Uecker) says that he threw over to "Metcalf" but the first baseman's name was Ward, as that was what was on the back of his jersey.
  • In the final scene of the film, at the point where Jake is holding Lynn up and Vaughn and Willie exchange their special handshake, you can see that Willie's jersey is much cleaner than it was while running the bases in the process of scoring the winning run.
  • When Taylor is in Lynn Wells boyfriend's apartment, his beer-glass goes from half-filled to three-quarters filled.
  • During the pre-game prayer the smoke from Pedro's altar sets off the locker room sprinklers. That type of sprinkler is activated by heat, not smoke, so they would not have gone off.
  • In the movie, Lynn's last name is Westland. In the credits, her last name is Wells.
  • In the last game, Dorn throws to a right handed first baseman. There is then a long shot of the players leaving the field and the first baseman is obviously left-handed.
  • During spring training, after the game against the Cubs, when players are looking to see if they got cut, Cerrano takes the snake and rubs the face of it on the paint on the locker. There is already a circle painted on the locker, and Cerrano makes a cross inside the circle with the snake. When the camera changes views, there is no cross on his locker.
  • During Manager Lou Brown's opening-day locker room speech, there is a flopped shot of Jake Taylor. The team name is obscured but the "Chief Wahoo" logo is backwards and on the opposite sleeve.
  • When the guy hits a home run and the fans are arguing that it's too high or too hard and then the other guy says, "Who gives a shit, it's gone," the words don't match his mouth.
  • The same fan comes out of the stands onto the field twice.
  • In the final playoff game, as Cerrano waits at the plate with Dorn on first in the 7th inning, there is a brief wide shot of the field, and the bases are empty.
  • In the last game of the series, whenever they pan to the score board, the clock says 10:20 every time it's shown, no matter how much time has passed.
  • In the Indians locker room prior to the opening game, Ricky Vaughn is sitting in a chair and nervously flipping and catching a baseball into the air with one hand. Jake Taylor comes over and says, "Relax kid, we've got 161 of these games left to go." On the next flip, Vaughn is supposed to be rattled by Taylor's comment and miss the catch (evidenced by the audible "thud" of the ball on the floor). However, if you look at the bottom of the frame, you can actually see Vaughn still catch the ball in his hand.
  • The Stroh's and Old Milwaukee Beer signs on the back fence of the spring training camp are replaced by Miller signs in one shot.
  • After the Indians start winning and have a record that is roughly 60-61, a series of newspaper articles sequentially appears with news of the Indians' latest success. The dates on the newspapers are inconsistent. The first one is some time in May (you can't have played 121 games by May!). Then as the season progresses and the Indians move toward first place, the newspaper dates move backwards into April, again an impossibility.
  • The stadium that the Cleveland Indians play their home games in throughout the movie is actually the old Milwaukee County Stadium, former home of the Milwaukee Brewers. Some billboards/ads in the stadium were not removed, like advertisements for area radio stations 94 WKTI and 620 WTMJ.
  • While the Yankees are batting in the top of the 9th in the playoff game, the scoreboard shows a 0 for runs in the inning for NY. After Haywood's strikeout ends the inning, they cut to a closeup of the scoreboard putting up the 0.
  • In the bus, Lou Brown tells Vaughn that he is starting Harris in the Yankee game instead of him. Vaughn is clearly a starting pitcher and, thus, would not normally be in the bullpen for the final out of the game. However, it is not uncommon for all pitchers (including starters) to be available during winner-take-all games. For example, Randy Johnson pitched in relief for the Mariners and was the winning pitcher in Game 5 of the 1995 ALDS against the Yankees.
  • In Jake's last at-bat, the Yankee pitcher throws him a brush-back pitch which causes him to dive into the dirt to avoid being hit. While on the ground, his uniform is very dirty from the dust of the batter's box. The Indian's radio announcer (Bob Uecker) says that "Taylor refuses to dust himself off". However, as Jake re-takes his stance, his uniform is clean. As Jake crosses first base on his bunt attempt, he falls into the dirt of the base path, again becoming very soiled. But in the post-game scenes he again has a clean, spiffy uniform.
  • As Cerrano hits his game-tying home run in the playoff game against the Yankees, he runs the bases with the bat in his hand, which (then and now) is an ejectable offense in Major League Baseball. [Note: this is not an accurate statement.]
  • In the scene where Rick Vaughn pitches for the first time during spring training, the "NO PEPPER" sign is on the left side of home plate before Vaughn pitches. After Vaughn throws his pitch, the sign moves to a location directly above home plate which is where the ball shatters the sign.
  • Just after all the players report to spring training, there is a shot of Roger Dorn walking with his duffel bag over his shoulder in the room with all the bunk beds. Right behind him, an extra playing one of the baseball player hopefuls (he has a mustache and is carrying a bag also) is walking behind him. The scene cuts to Dorn saying hello to Jake Taylor (Tom Berenger). When it cuts back to just Dorn, you can see that same extra doing exactly the same walking pattern he just did a second ago, like he just arrived twice.
  • When pitching, Vaughn is using an outfielder's glove which is somewhat bigger than a glove a "real" pitcher or infielder would use. However, many baseball players are highly superstitious and many pitchers do use non-infielder gloves, including at least one pitcher in the early 90s who used a catcher's mitt.
  • In the final game, during Haywood's last at bat, Jake Taylor (the catcher) is nearly standing for the final "strike-out" pitch by Vaughn. First, a catcher would never stand that tall, unless they were making the pitch an obvious high, out-of-the-strike-zone pitch. Second, as Haywood swings through the pitch for Strike 3, the ball is shown hitting Jake Taylor's catcher's mitt perfectly in the middle of the strike zone, about a foot below where the ball was just one frame earlier. Incorrect. Catchers definitely stand that tall, although it is not common. Vaughn hit the glove, but hit it at the high target set by Taylor. There is nothing in the film that suggests the pitch was in the strike zone.
  • Cerrano and Haywood tossed their bats and their helmets to the ground, which (then and now) is believed to be an ejectable offense in Major League Baseball. However, this is only true when an umpire feels the player is "showing up the umpire." Any umpire would see this is in disgust of their own action and would never throw out a player for that.
  • When Dorn throws out the runner at first, the throw is caught by a right handed first baseman. When the Indians run off the field, it is an entirely different group of players. The 1B is now left-handed and wearing Dorn's #24, the pitcher is much younger looking and wearing #10.
  • In the ninth inning of the final game against the Yankees, Vaughn comes out to retire the last hitter. With the bases loaded, Jake (the catcher) only gives one set of signals. In such situations, there are two, sometimes even three, sets of signals to prevent on-base players from stealing signals and communicating to the batter what is coming.
  • When Jake confronts Roger in his house after tanking the next to last play in the Oakland game, Jake says he didn't come up with the ball Riker hit. The player who hit it had Alcantara on his jersey. Riker was the following batter (who Jake distracts by talking about his wife).
  • In all of the newspapers shown for 1988 and beyond, the headlines and pictures are about baseball, but the actual stories are not.
  • When Cerrano lights up the cigar for Jobu during Harris' prayer before the first game, you can hear Chelcie Ross delivering the line "Jesus Christ, Cerrano" in the background before they cut to him.
  • In the final-cutdown scene, the team is in their home clubhouse as evidenced by Cerrano's elaborate decoration of his locker, as well as the sign outside when Hayes celebrates. The team is wearing their (gray) road uniforms.
  • In his final at-bat Jake (the catcher) has a close up of his hands with the bat on his shoulder. His knuckles are aligned incorrectly. All real baseball players know that the "knocking knuckles" must be aligned while the bat is on your shoulder in order to have straight wrists when following through with your swing. (this error happens several times during the movie from other characters). If you don't align your "knocking knuckles" correctly, one or both of your wrists will be bent and you will have difficulty swinging with power.
  • When the Indians start making their run and we start to see the newspaper articles, the first 3 headlines include the same article. It reads "Kansas City" even though none of the first three games mentioned were against Kansas City. Furthermore, the article mentions Doug Jones, a real-life Indians reliever in the late-'80s/early-'90s.
  • When they report to spring training in the bunk room Willie introduces himself to Jake and Ricky, seconds later Cerrano takes Dorn's golf club cover to use for his bat and in the background you see Willie just walking through the door. But that would be impossible since Willie was just talking to Jake and Ricky seconds before.
  • When Lou has Ricky Vaughn in his office and is discussing his eyesight problem, there are a pair of glasses sitting on top of Lou's desk. Lou writes down some letters on a pad, the camera angle changes as Lou stands up; the glasses are no longer on the desk.
  • One of the players on the Yankees is wearing #37, which was last worn by manager Casey Stengel in 1960 and retired soon thereafter.
  • Willie Mays Hayes scores an infield single in his first at-bat of the season. However, the ball he puts in play hits Hayes' body right after his bat. Rule 6.05(h) states that this should have been ruled a foul ball.
  • When Jake first follows Lynn to her fiancé's apartment, he is able to just walk right in without needing a key or being allowed in. Considering that it's most likely a high-class building, Jake would have had to break in.
  • During the National Television game against the A's, Taylor was talking trash to Rexman during an at-bat, which is (then and now) an ejectable offense in Major League Baseball.
  • When Lou Brown talks to Vaughn about sending him back to the minors to work on his control, he says "take Ryan there," motioning to a picture behind him as an example of a pitcher who turned it around in the minors. Yet the audio of "Ryan" is clearly dubbed in; Brown mouths "Koufax" and a picture of the left-handed Sandy Koufax (Ryan was a righty) is shown when Brown stands up. This line was likely changed after someone informed the writer/director David S. Ward that Sandy Koufax never played a day in the minor leagues, having joined the Dodgers directly out of high school.
  • During the first game, there are several shots of the stadium scoreboard with the clock indicating it is approximately 10:50AM. No regular season major league game would start that early in the morning.
  • Incorrectly regarded as a goof. All "real baseball players" do not align their "knocking knuckles." That technique was taught in some baseball camps, but it more the exception than the rule. It's easy to see now with DVRs: pause the picture when there is a close-up of a hitter and you'll see that almost all of them use a box grip.
  • It is not an ejectable offense (then or now) in Major League Baseball to run the bases while carrying a bat, unless the umpire believes it will disrupt the play, e.g., the ball is live and there will be a play at the base where the batter/runner is going. Even then, the umpire will probably just call the batter out for interference. Carrying the bat is an ejectable offense in girls' fast-pitch softball.
  • Rachael Phelps attempts to break the team included imposing improper Locker/Training/Conditioning Room and traveling conditions. Such conditions would be gross violations of the Collective Bargaining Agreement between MLB team Owners and the Players' Union.
  • It is mentioned in the film that the Indians had not been able to beat the Yankees. In a one game playoff, the team with the better record is awarded home field advantage. The 1 game playoff should have been played in New York. At the time of the movie, home field for a one game playoff was determined by a coin flip in league offices upon such a game becoming a possibility. The process of awarding home field for a one game playoff based on the teams' head to head record was not adapted by Major League Baseball until the 2010's.
  • When Cerrano lights the cigar for Jobu during Harris' prayer, we see smoke rise to an automatic sprinkler system and set it off. Although it takes extreme heat of a fire to set off such systems, the heat of the smoke would not have been enough to activate the system.
  • Throughout the movie, both Vaughn and Harris appear as starting, relief, and closing pitchers. Major League pitchers are designated as one or the other and will rarely enter a game outside of their designated spot (i.e., it's rare for a relief or closing pitcher to start a game or a starting pitcher to come in as a relief or closing pitcher).
  • The newspaper article showing the Indians winning 5 in a row and move into 4th spot, is dated may 28th, after 120 odd games they should be into August, not still in May.
  • In the scene in Lynn's fiance's apartment, Lynn says that she swam the 200 meter individual medley and was an alternate on the Olympic team. The 200 meter individual medley is not an Olympic event. The proper distance for the Olympics is 400 meters.
  • Shot of extra used twice. There is a larger man portraying a fan wearing a grey shirt towards the end of the film who runs out of the field in celebration - the same loop is used twice. The first time is right when Jake sees Lynn in the stands, the second is when he starts kissing her and carrying her onto the field.
  • When Ricky Vaughn is being introduced in the final game and the "Wild Thing" theme plays, there are shots of the crowd cheering and singing along with the song. In one shot of the upper deck crowd, there is a poster board hanging off the railing with a cartoon caricature of Vaughn. In a later shot of the crowd, a fan in the lower decks is holding up a poster board with the exact same drawing. (As stated in the DVD Commentary, the final game was shot over the course of a few nights so it's likely that the same poster board was used on different nights of the shoot.)
  • During the dinner party that Jake walks in on, he mentions that Lynn was an alternate on the 1980 Olympic team (200 individual medley). Since the United States boycotted the summer Olympics in 1980, it might seem that this would not be possible. However, the U.S. did, in fact, have an Olympic Team in 1980; it's just that they did not participate in the Olympics.

Spoilers

  • In the one-game playoff with the Yankees, after Taylor bunts, Willie Mays Hayes tries to score. When the catcher catches the ball thrown from first base, the umpire is behind him without his cap on (shot filmed from behind first base). In the next two shots, with Hayes sliding and the umpire calling 'safe, safe', he is wearing his cap again.
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