It Chapter Two Movie Poster

Trivia for It Chapter Two

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  • The members of the Loser's Club from It (2017) were asked who they wanted to play their adult parts: Finn Wolfhard (Richie Tozier) said Bill Hader, Sophia Lillis (Beverly Marsh) said Jessica Chastain, Chosen Jacobs (Mike Hanlon) said Chadwick Boseman, Jack Dylan Grazer (Eddie Kaspbrak) said Jake Gyllenhaal, Wyatt Oleff (Stanley Uris) said Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Jeremy Ray Taylor (Ben Hanscom) said Chris Pratt and Jaeden Martell (Bill Denbrough) said Christian Bale. Bale turned down outright while Boseman was unavailable due to his Marvel-contractual obligations as Black Panther. Wolfhard and Lillis's choices were the only two that ended up being cast. James McAvoy was recommended by Chastain in returning the favor of her being recommended by him to Simon Kinberg for the antagonist role of Vuk in their previous collaboration Dark Phoenix (2019).
  • In the book, this second half of It takes place in 1985, shortly before the 1st movie takes place. In this movie, however, it takes place in the mid 2010s.
  • Released on Sep. 6th, 2019, almost two years after the release of It (2017).
  • According to insiders Den of Geek, the script was due to be finished in January 2018.
  • Although this movie is about the adults, the kids make appearances in several flashback scenes.
  • In an interview to promote Molly's Game (2017), Jessica Chastain expressed an interest in playing Beverly Marsh. During the filming of Chapter One, she emerged as the fan-favorite to play the older Bev with director Andy Muschietti, producer Barbara Muschietti and actress Sophia Lillis all going on record to say she would be their first choice too.
  • Continuing with the extreme coincidence of the number 27, this film was on September 6, 2019 (9+6+2+0+1+9 = 27). The 1st chapter It (2017) was released on September 8, 2017 (9+8+2+0+1+7 = 27). There's a 27 year age gap between Isaiah Mustafa (Mike Hanlon) and Chosen Jacobs (young Mike) as well as Teach Grant (Henry Bowers) and Nicholas Hamilton (young Henry).
  • The mini-series It (1990) with Tim Curry was released in 1990. 27 years later, the theatrical version It (2017) was released. In the original novel, It comes back every 27 years.
  • This will be the final movie of IT.
  • Marlon Taylor, Jarred Blancard, and Brandon Crane from the 1990 miniseries had expressed interest in reprising their roles as Mike Hanlon, Henry Bowers, and Ben Hanscom, respectively. Though, Crane ends up making a cameo in this film as one of Ben's employees at his architect company.
  • Fans of the miniseries suggested the actors to make cameos into the movie, with the exceptions of Jonathan Brandis (Young Bill), John Ritter (Ben Hanscom), and Harry Anderson (Richie Tozier), as they've passed away.
  • This marks the fifth collaboration between Jessica Chastain and James McAvoy after "The disappearence of Eleanor Rigby: Her" (2013), "The disappearence of Eleanor Rigby: Him" (2013), "The disappearence of Eleanor Rigby: Them" (2014) and "X-Men: Dark Phoenix" (2019).
  • This movie marks a reunion between Jessica Chastain, Bill Hader, James McAvoy and Jess Weixler. They previously starred in The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Him (2013), The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Her (2013) and The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Them (2014), although Weixler didn't appear in "Him".
  • In April 2018, it was announced that Bill Hader had entered talks to play Richie Tozier. In the same week, Harry Anderson, who played the role in It (1990), had passed away.
  • As of May 2018, the official cast list for the adult versions of the characters includes James McAvoy as Bill Denbrough, Bill Hader as Richie Tozier, Jessica Chastain as Beverly Marsh, James Ransone as Eddie Kaspbrak, and Andy Bean as Stan Uris. Yet to be cast are Ben Hanscom, Mike Hanlon, and Henry Bowers. Bill Skarsgård is returning as Pennywise, Jackson Robert Scott is also returning as Georgie Denbrough. The rest of the younger cast is said to appear for flashback scenes, either by footage from It (2017) that had been unused, or by filming of new footage.
  • This is the second Stephen King adaptation released in 2019, following Pet Sematary (2019). "It: Chapter One" was also the second-wide release Stephen King adaptation in 2017 following The Dark Tower (2017).
  • Jessica Chastain, Bill Skarsgård and James McAvoy have starred in at least one X-Men movie. Chastain and McAvoy starred together in Dark Phoenix (2019), marking this their third collaboration, and Skarsgård was in Deadpool 2 (2018), which also features a cameo from McAvoy as Professor X.
  • Second collaboration of actress Jessica Chastain, director Andy Muschietti, producer Barbara Muschietti and actor Javier Botet. All four worked previously on the horror movie Mama (2013). Chastain was the only one not to work with the other three on It (2017).
  • Filmed under the pseudonym "Largo."
  • James Ransone (Eddie) and Jeremy Ray Taylor (young Ben) share the same birthday: June 2nd.
  • Jessica Chastain, James McAvoy and Bill Hader all starred in The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby.
  • Filming began on June 19, 2018, in Toronto, Canada, and officially wrapped on October 30, 2018.
  • Began filming on June 18, 2018, the same day the Pet Semetary remake began principal photography.
  • Bill Hader was approached for the role of Richie Tozier based on Finn Wolfhard's wish to cast him in the sequel. Hader, who had never met Wolfhard, was extremely flattered that Wolfhard wanted him to take on the role.
  • One of Richie Tozier's character traits is his ability to do "voices" and impressions. Bill Hader is a well-known impressionist, famous for the celebrity impressions he did for years on "Saturday Night Live." With this in mind, screenwriter Gary Dauberman wrote a scene in which Richie does an impression of Al Pacino, a voice that Hader is quite good at. However, Hader requested that the impression be removed from the script because the Pacino impression was old material and he didn't feel like doing it again.
  • The first photo of the new adult cast together was released by the official "It" Twitter account on July 2, 2018.
  • Jessica Chastain was considered for Beverly while the first film was still in production. She was also the first one to be officially cast.
  • Wyatt Oleff celebrated his fifteenth birthday on set.
  • The character Mike Hanlon is essentially the one chosen to be the look-out and call the remaining losers back to Derry. Mike Hanlon is played by Isaiah Mustafa as an adult and Chosen Jacobs as a kid. The name "Mustafa" means "chosen one" in Arabic.
  • Bill Skarsgård (Pennywise) has stated that he had more fun on set during this movie because he was actually able to talk to and hang out with his adult co-stars. Skarsgård had minimal contact with his child co-stars in Chapter One so that they would be more genuinely scared of Pennywise once they saw him.
  • James McAvoy injured himself for real during his character's fight scenes with Pennywise, suffering a double thigh strain. At one point, McAvoy shared a picture on his Instagram page with bags of ice on his thighs.
  • Of the cast, only one pair of actors who portray the same character share the same hometown. The actors who portray Stanley Uris, Wyatt Oleff and Andy Bean, were both born and raised in Chicago, Illinois.
  • IT: Chapter 2 wrapped up filming on November 1st, 2018
  • Bill Skarsgard's older brother, Alexander Skarsgard, costarred with James Ransone on HBO's Generation Kill.
  • The film had a lengthy 86 day shoot.
  • Chris Pratt was considered for the role of Ben Hanscom.
  • Chadwick boseman was considered for the role of mike Hanlon.
  • Joseph Gordon Levitt was considered for the role of Stanley Uris.
  • Jessica Chastain had previously acted in Andy Muschietti's 2013 feature Mama.
  • Likewise, the supporting cast aren't major Hollywood stars many fans were expecting the sequel to such a smash hit to get. It's mostly people who have acting experience from lesser known films, as well as TV shows.
  • Fake American: Jay Ryan is a New Zealander. James McAvoy is Scottish.
  • Jessica Chastain and Jess Weixler, who portrays Beverly and Audra, respectively, are real-life best friends.
  • The film was based on the second half of the 1986 novel of same name by Stephen King.
  • Bill Hader said since it was his first time acting in a horror film he struggled to act scared, because his natural reaction to being scared was to nervously smile.
  • Jessica Chastain and the director Andy Muschietti also worked together on Mama (2013)
  • Bill Hader was unaware that Bill Skarsgård can actually move his eyes in two different directions. Hader asked Skarsgård what kind of editing was done to achieve the effect in the first movie. Skarsgård, in full costume and makeup, responded by saying "Oh, you mean this?" and doing it, causing Hader to freak out.
  • This is Bill Hader's first horror film.
  • The role of Richie Tozier in this film was written with Bill Hader in mind, but it still allowed freedom for another actor to potentially take on the role. Once Hader officially joined the cast, the script was edited to tailor the role specifically for his talents.
  • Idris Elba expressed interest in playing Mike prior to Isaiah Mustafa's casting. It would have been Elba's second Stephen King adaptation, following The Dark Tower (2017).
  • Bill Skarsgård stated in an interview that even after filming had wrapped, he would have nightmares of Pennywise. In these nightmares, he would have to battle Pennywise just as the characters in the film do.
  • Jess Weixler (Audra, Bill's wife) was pregnant during filming. Although Audra makes only a brief appearance in this movie, she plays a much larger and more crucial role in both the novel and the miniseries, It (1990).
  • Jay Ryan (Ben Hanscom) used to work as a clown before his acting career took off.
  • Xavier Dolan met director Andy Muschietti randomly and expressed interest about being in this film, having loved the first one. Dolan said "I'll do anything you want, be the door handle, the door knob, the curtain, whatever I can do in this film". He was later cast as Adrian Mellon.
  • James McAvoy and Jessica Chastain co-starred in X-Men: Dark Phoenix.
  • Seth Green, who played the young Richie in the TV movie It (1990), expressed interest in playing the adult Richie in this film.
  • At 2 hours and 49 minutes, this film is 34 minutes longer than It (2017), which ran for 2 hours and 15 minutes. In total, both films have a combined running time of 5 hours and 4 minutes, which is over two hours longer than the original 1990 miniseries adaptation of Stephen King's novel.
  • The script was tailored for Bill Hader's talents and, as such, contained a scene in which he performed his famous Al Pacino impression. Hader requested that the scene be removed, as he did not want to repeat things that he had done before.
  • The young actors who were the Losers Club in chapter one grew tremendously in the 2 years following filming. They had to be digitally 'de-aged' in some scenes as they looked significantly older than before.
  • In the funhouse the clown puppets that are swinging from the ceiling resemble Pennywise from the original It miniseries.
  • Was filmed in Hawk Scope (anamorphic), unlike its predecessor, which was Filmed in Panavision (anamorphic).
  • Parents lobbied to have the movie poster banned/altered in Queensland, Australia, stating that it gave their children nightmares.
  • The young Losers Club actors were de-aged in the film, the first time ever in a horror film.
  • Unlike in the miniseries where adult Richie contact lenses, adult Richie wears glasses in this film.
  • Cameo: Author Stephen King makes a cameo as the shop attendant selling the bike to Bill.
  • Andy Muschietti denied any reports that Stephen King add in an all new for the film.
  • Stephen King calls the film not a sequel but the second half to It.
  • According to Bill Hader, the working title of the movie was "It's"
  • Stephen King makes an appearance in the movie as the owner of a secondhand store.
  • (Cameo) Brandon Crane: (young Ben from It (1990)) Employee at Ben's architect firm.
  • When adult Eddie is back at Keene's Pharmacy to get a refill for his inhaler, the man that is standing in one of the aisles to the left of Eddie as he's walking to the counter is Andy Muschietti who is the director of IT.
  • A license plate on the wall above the owner of the antiques shop is "CQB 241" the same as the license plate in Christine (1983). The owner (who is played by Stephen King, the original author of both Christine and It) also asks for $300 for the bike, the same amount that George LeBay initially offers to sell the car for.
  • [Cameo] (Andy Muschietti, Director): patron in the pharmacy as Eddie comes to pick up his inhaler.
  • (Cameo) Peter Bogdanovich: The director of the movie based on Bill's book.
  • During his cameo, Stephen King drinks from a Club Atlético Independiente branded mate (traditional Argentinian beverage). Director Andy Muschietti is a fan of the Argentine soccer team.
  • The clubhouse features a poster for The Lost Boys (1987). That film featured Kiefer Sutherland and Corey Feldman, who also appeared in another Stephen King adaptation, Stand by Me (1986).
  • Webby, portrayed by Jake Weary, targets and attacks Adrian, portrayed by Xavier Dolan, because he is gay. Weary not only plays a gay man in Animal Kingdom (2016), but his boyfriend's name is Adrian.
  • Brandon Crane who played young Ben in the 90s TV movie, has a small cameo as the businessman on a video call to the current old Ben.
  • (Cameo) Stephen King: (author of the novel) Pawn Shop keeper where Bill buys his old bicycle.
  • In the arcade scenes set in 1989, Street Fighter and Mortal Kombat are seen. The latter was not released until the early 90's.
  • Second movie of 2019 in which Jessica Chastain and James McAvoy star together. The other one is Dark Phoenix (2019).
  • When adult Richie enters the abandoned theater, there is a shot where an old delapidated You've Got Mail poster is behind him. If you look closely, the torn parts of the poster spell out "IT".
  • At one point, Richie makes a joke about Eddie's height to which Eddie responds "I'm five-nine.". Which is true since James Ransone is five-nine. But Ransone isn't the smallest male Loser. That would be James McAvoy who is five-seven, making him the second smallest Loser. The first is Jessica Chastain rounding out the group at five-four.
  • Stephen King makes a cameo appearance as the Shopkeeper, which is a direct reference to his 1991 book and 1993 film Needful Things (1993).
  • (Director Cameo) Andy Muschietti: Customer at the pharmacy where Eddie picks up his prescription.
  • The first film adaptation of a Stephen King novel with a cameo by the author since Thinner (1996).
  • During the scene where Beverly has to face her fears, the bathroom fills up with blood and one character says "Here's Johnny!", paying a homage to the film The Shining (1980), based on the book by Stephen King.
  • In the opening scene, the gay couple taunts one of the thugs by comparing his haircut to Meg Ryan's. Ryan makes a cameo of sorts later in the movie, on an old poster of You've Got Mail (1998) in the abandoned theater.
  • The orderly who takes adult Henry Bowers (Teach Grant) to his room says that they need to increase Henry's dose of clozapine. Clozapine is an antipsychotic drug meant for patients with the most severe forms of schizophrenia, who do not respond to any other medication, which indicates how psychotic and delusional everyone thinks Henry is.
  • Pennywise is only in the film for 10 minutes.
  • On the side of Mike's Native American artifact is a symbol of a circle with one large point and several smaller points. This represents the Dark Tower. Stephen King's Dark Tower series of novels connects a number of his works including It, The Shining, The Stand, Salem's Lot, Insomnia, and numerous others. The sixth book, Song of Susannah, implies that It is one of the six greater demon elementals. It's rival, the turtle Maturin, is one of the guardians of the tower's beams while It's mission is to destroy the beam.
  • This is the third and final monster movie of 2019 to feature a cast member of Stranger Things (2016) in a prominent role. The films being Hellboy (2019) with David Harbour, Godzilla: King of the Monsters (2019) with Millie Bobby Brown, and It Chapter Two (2019) with Finn Wolfhard.
  • In the novel, Eddie ponders that he may have married Myra because she reminded him of his mother. In this film adaptation, the same actress, Molly Atkinson, portrays both Myra Kaspbrak (Eddie's wife) as well as Sonia Kaspbrak (Eddie's mother).
  • The actress who plays Eddie's mom also plays Eddie's wife.
  • Towards the end of the film, Mike Hanlon (Isaiah Mustafa) places a book about Derry's history on a table. The author is mentioned as being Richard Bachman, a pen named used by It writer Stephen King during his writing career.
  • The scene when adult Eddie visits the pharmacy, director Andy Muschietti can be seen screen left browsing the aisles.
  • (Cameo) Jason Fuchs: (co-producer) Richie's manager.
  • Finn Wolfhard (young Richie Tozier) filmed both It Chapter Two (2019) and season 3 of Stranger Things (2016) at the same time. In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, he said it was tiring and stressful, but rewarding at the same time to shoot It Chapter Two (2019) during his off days from filming Stranger Things (2016) 3.
  • The first of two Stephen King sequels in 2019 by Warner Brothers. The second film is Doctor Sleep (2019). Interestingly, both feature a Scottish actor taking on the role of a grown-up version of a child from the last film. James McAvoy plays an adult Bill Denbrough, succeeding Jaeden Martell while Ewan McGregor succeeds Danny Lloyd as adult Danny Torrance.
  • This movie is by far the longest horror movie ever!
  • In 2019, the film had the best opening weekend for an R rated movie with $92 million, until Joker (2019) beat its record with $96 million. Both films are also distributed by Warner Brothers.
  • Jake Weary had previously starred in another horror film about a demonic entity and has the word, "it", in the title, It Follows (2014).
  • There's been a debate about whether this film is as good as Chapter One, better, or not as good. Some people state that they like this film better than the first film. But as a collective, most agree that the film is not as strong as the first which is prominently due to the innocence of the characters when they were children and having to deal with Pennywise at such a young age. Parts of the novel and the miniseries also has this same problem concerning the adult sections of the story.
  • Similar to Freddy Krueger, Pennywise uses fear to terrorize and murder his victims. It can be whatever fear that person has. It's also noted that both characters use the personal insecurities and grief of their victims to make them more vulnerable and easier to kill.
  • The film has the second highest-grossing opening of all time for a horror film, behind the first film, with $92 million.
  • Coincidentally, the two actors who portrayed Pennywise, Tim Curry and Bill Skarsgård, each have green eyes. Though Skarsgård's natural green eyes are never shown in this film and Chapter One, in the It (1990) miniseries, there are some scenes where you can see Curry's natural green eyes. Most notably in the iconic scene where he's luring Georgie.
  • Unlike the initial 5-hour make-up process for the first film, it took 2 and a half hours to apply the clown makeup on Bill Skarsgård for this film.
  • Due to the huge success of the first film and the immense anticipation of this film, the film was initially projected to earn about $130 million to $150 million in its opening weekend. However, due to circumstances such as the somewhat lukewarm word-of-mouth and the very long length of the film, the film opened at $92 million, a little over $30 million short of Chapter One's $123 million opening.
  • This is the second film starring Jack Dylan Grazer that was released in 2019. The first film is Shazam! (2019). Both films are distributed by Warner Brothers.
  • This is the second film starring Finn Wolfhard that was released in 2019. The first film is The Goldfinch (2019).
  • At 169 minutes it is the longest horror film given a wide theatrical release.
  • This is the second film starring Bill Skarsgård that was released in 2019. The first film is Villains (2019).
  • This is the third film starring James McAvoy that was released in 2019. The first two films are Glass (2019) and Dark Phoenix (2019).
  • This is the second film starring Jessica Chastain that was released in 2019. The first film is Dark Phoenix (2019).
  • For the final battle, Bill Skarsgård did motion capture performance.
  • The fake blood that Jessica Chastain gets covered in was made of a thickening agent called methylcellulose and red dye.
  • Rodeo FX provided 397 visual effects shots for the film.
  • There were rumors at one point Bill Skarsgård would not be returning to play Pennywise in this film due to concerns that the role was negatively affecting his mental health. However, a week before the first film was released, Skarsgard confirmed that he was officially attached to the sequel and had already began meeting with director Andy Muschietti to discuss ideas for the character and the film.
  • Seven different visual effects companies provided the visual effects for this film. They are Atomic Arts, Method Studios, Rodeo FX, Lola VFX, Cubica VFX, Make VFX, and Soho VFX.
  • Due to his performance in It (2017) and this film, some people had suggested that Bill Skarsgård should play The Joker in Matt Reeves's The Batman (2021).
  • Producer Barbara Muschietti confirmed that Jessica Chastain was being considered for the role of adult Beverly. Sophia Lillis, who portrays young Beverly, also revealed that Chastain was her first choice in the role. In February 2018, Chastain was officially confirmed for the role.
  • The child actors and adult actors who portray The Losers Club became very close before, during, and after filming. In particular, Sophia Lillis and Jessica Chastain constantly bonded.
  • This film and its predecessor, It (2017), marks the second time a European actor portraying Pennywise. Tim Curry, who is British, portrayed the character in the 90s miniseries, and Bill Skarsgård, who is Swedish, portrayed the character in Chapter One and this film.
  • The first movie took place from October 1988 to September 1989. However, unlike the first film, this film didn't have any timestamps to let viewers know what month or year it was. However, knowing that Pennywise/It slumbers every 27 years and when The Losers last battled him, this film takes place in 2016. And judging by the carnival fair that arrived in Derry, the film takes place in either September or October 2016.
  • Pennywise's costume in the film and its predecessor is much more faithful to the description in the novel, in comparison to the Tim Curry costume in the 1990s TV miniseries, including his orange hair, and the orange pom-poms down his silver suit. The miniseries only included the orange pom-poms.
  • The casting for the adult Losers Club was overwhelmingly praised mainly due to the physical resemblances to the child actors. One of the issues that some people had with the It (1990) miniseries was that most of the adult actors looked nothing like the child actors.
  • Nicholas Hamilton, who portrays Henry Bowers in It (2017) and this film, has portrayed a minor character named Lucas Hanson in another Stephen King film adaptation, The Dark Tower (2017).
  • Director Andy Muschietti stated that he plans to make a super cut of Chapter One and this film that's similar to the 90s miniseries.
  • According to director Andy Muschietti, the film has over 4 hours of footage which had to be cut down to 2 hours and 49 minutes. Muschietti states that he plans to use the unused footage and scenes not yet filmed for a possible future film related to the "It" franchise.
  • This film is the third film released in 2019 that used de-aging technology. The other films are Captain Marvel (2019), Avengers: Endgame (2019), Gemini Man (2019), and The Irishman (2019), respectively.
  • The scene where Beverly is trying to escape from her old home as briefly glimpsed in the trailers, Pennywise is shown in his "human" form. This is the only time Bill Skarsgård is shown without the clown makeup on until he "smears" it onto his face in the scene by frightening Bev.
  • In the film, Eddie Kaspbrak is depicted as an insurance risk analyst. However, in the novel, he is depicted as a limousine company owner. There is a hint to the source material in the film related to this piece of information. When Eddie is on the phone with his wife, he gets the phone call from Mike Hanlon. During this call, he has a car accident. His Escalade clearly has a NYC "T&LC" (Taxi and Limousine Commission) license plate affixed to the front bumper.
  • It (alongside Randall Flagg) is regarded as the most evil and popular of Stephen King's villains and an immense icon in horror. In 2006, Wizard Magazine ranked It as the 15th Greatest Villain of All Time.
  • Contrary to the novel, in which the children's journey with Pennywise begins in 1958 and ends in 1985 as adults, the first film followed the initial encounter between The Losers Club and Pennywise in 1989 (thirty-one years after the initial encounter and four years after the final encounter between the club and Pennywise, respectively, in the novel), and this film sees their final encounter in 2016 (fifty-eight years after the initial encounter and thirty-five years after the final encounter between the club and Pennywise, respectively, in the novel).
  • With It (2017) and this film, Bill Skarsgård and Chosen Jacobs are among two of the actors from any Stephen King related films to star in Castle Rock (2018), a show based off of King's novel of the same name. The other actor that stars in the show is Sissy Spacek. Spacek starred in Carrie (1976), another film based on a well-known King novel.
  • This foreshadows Adrian Mellon's death in "Chapter Two" when he wears a hat containing the same phrase.
  • Filming the Adrian Mellon sequence took place during salmon season, and six tons of dead fish had to be removed from the canal due to the stench.
  • Isaiah Mustafa, after auditioning multiple times for the role, was the last adult Loser to be cast.
  • Molly Atkinson, the actress who played Eddie's mother in "IT," plays Eddie's wife in "IT Chapter Two."
  • Andy Bean (adult Stanley Uris) is Bill Skarsgård (Pennywise)'s close friend and was his guest at the premiere of It (2017), where Bean met director Andy Muschietti for the first time.
  • Jessica Chastain was the first person to be cast for this film.
  • Isaiah Mustafa previously appeared as the "Old Spice guy" in a series of commercials.
  • Andy Muschietti has a background as a storyboard artist and commercial director, which makes him view every frame as precious.
  • The scene with the firefly is designed to mirror the first film's sewer scene with Georgie.
  • Isaiah Mustafa went through Stephen King's novel eight times before filming so he could fully understand the character, Mike Hanlon.
  • Most of the young Losers had their body hair shaved and had to raise the pitch of their voices for the second film.
  • The young Losers attended the "IT" Experience in Hollywood as a group and were able to remain unnoticed by most of the fans in attendance.
  • When filming this film, Chosen Jacobs had to have wooden risers placed in his shoes because of how much the other Losers had grown.
  • Jessica Chastain starred in Andy Muschietti's first feature film, "Mama" (2013).
  • Javier Botet, who appeared as the titular character in "Mama," plays both Mrs. Kersh (as the witch) and the Leper in "IT Chapter Two."
  • The shooting date for Bill Hader's park scene was moved to accommodate a picnic that was also scheduled at the location.
  • James McAvoy is a massive Stephen King fan and has read most of his books.
  • Jaeden Martell only cries when doing foreign accents or when singing in a high pitch.
  • Jay Ryan used to work as a clown and would make balloon animals for the children.
  • Andy Muschietti has a cameo in the pharmacy scene featuring adult Eddie Kaspbrak.
  • The teenage version of the pharmacist's daughter is played by Megan Charpentier, who costarred in "Mama" and also appeared in "IT."
  • Jack Dylan Grazer was 4'11" when filming It (2017). He was nearly 5'6" when filming this film.
  • James McAvoy and Jessica Chastain were working on Dark Phoenix (2019) together when they discovered they were both top contenders for this film.
  • The club was burnt down by a group of white supremacists.
  • Andy Muschietti has filmed all of his feature productions in Toronto, Canada, and works with a lot of the same crew.
  • Weeks after the film's release, Jessica Chastain shared on her Instagram account a video of her in a kiddy pool pouring so much of the fake blood onto herself. This was to make sure she would get used to the liquid formula since gallons would end up being used. Chastain can be heard saying, "Oh my God, it's so disgusting!" on the video. She wrote in the caption of the video, "'Be an actress,' they said. 'It'll be glamorous,' they said." The song, "Only Time" by Enya can be heard in the video.
  • James Ransone is friends with Bill Skarsgård's brother, Alexander Skarsgård. James had known Bill since he was a teenager.
  • The adult Losers wear only one outfit each while they're in Derry, though 50-60 versions of the outfits were designed for the actors to wear throughout filming.
  • Chosen Jacobs and Isaiah Mustafa, who portray child Mike Hanlon and adult Mike Hanlon, respectively, are 27 years apart in age. Similarly, Nicholas Hamilton and Teach Grant, who portray teen Henry Bowers and adult Henry Bowers, respectively, are also 27 years apart in age.
  • When we first see adult Henry Bowers in the mental asylum, there is an episode of "Tom and Jerry" playing on a TV. It shows them chasing a piece of meat that was floating on water and ends up going down a sewer drain, very similar to Georgie's boat from the first film. This is most likely a reference to how Pennywise views the kids as food.
  • As Bill is looking at 'Silver' in the window of second hand store there is a business across the street called Racine Law. This is possibly a tribute to Lawrence Kasdan's superb 1981 thriller Body Heat. One of the main characters, played by William Hurt, was named Ned Racine and he was a lawyer.
  • Second Stephen King adaptation to feature two X-Men cast members. James McAvoy and Jessica Chastain appear in Dark Phoenix. Ian McKellen and Bruce Davison appeared together in Apt Pupil.
  • After Mike Hanlon takes the red balloon off the bush, you can see a faint silhouette of Pennywise on the brick bridge support as he walks past it.
  • About two years after the first film's success and a few months before this film's release, in July 2019, producer Larry Sanitsky, who produced the It (1990) miniseries, sued Warner Brothers for breach of contract over the prevention of involvement of the feature film adaptations of the "It" novel. Sanitsky and Frank Konigsberg bought the rights to the novel back in the late 80s before the miniseries was filmed. The lawsuit claimed that Sanitsky and Konigsberg subsequently signed a deal with Warner Brothers in ensuring that the pair would be involved in any remakes, sequels, or spin-offs, and the pair are owed $1 million in profit participation on the miniseries. The suit is pending.
  • The original Stephen King novel runs to 1128 pages.
  • During his phone call with Mike at the end of the film (2hr 39mins), Bill mentions that he's just finished the first chapter of a new book. Looking closely you can see that it's actually an excerpt from the novel IT. Specifically, chapter 16 'Eddie's Big Break.'

Spoilers

  • In the original novel Mike is the character who is a bookworm and spends time in the library and eventually is the group member who stays in Derry and owns a library when everyone else leaves in case "IT" comes back. But since this was changed so that Ben is into books and not Mike, Ben might be the character in the sequel to stay in Derry and Mike might leave.
  • It: Chapter Two is rumored to include a scene that was cut from the first film. The scene is set back in the 1600's and has Pennywise devour a human baby. This scene was cut from the film because it was extremely dark and disturbing.
  • Henry Bowers' fate was left ambiguous in It (2017) after he was pushed down a well. It wasn't until Teach Grant was cast that the audience learned that Bowers survived the fall. Unless you have read the novel, or any of the articles published after the release of It (2017) that explained Henry's fate and subsequent return for the sequel, then his survival would be of no surprise to anyone whatsoever.
  • In It (2017), Henry Bowers' fate after being pushed down the well shaft was left ambiguous by the filmmakers. It wasn't confirmed that he survived until it was announced that Teach Grant joined the cast.
  • The Black Spot Nightclub fire, which was intended to appear in Chapter One but was cut due to budget constraints, is planned to be the opening scene of this movie. It's not
  • The Smokehole scene, which is in the book, was originally planned for the predecessor It (2017), but ultimately removed from the script as it was deemed too expensive. It was finally used in this sequel (albeit as a flashback).
  • A deleted scene from It (2017) revealed that Henry Bowers had killed his two remaining friends just before confronting the Losers' Club in the Neibolt house at the end (probably at the suggestion of Pennywise), which explains why they were absent from the rest of the film. This scene was rumored to be in this film, but it is not.
  • 9×3 is 27. 999 is 666 upside down.
  • 27 years pass before the Loser's Club has to face Pennywise again. 3 × 9 = 27, 999 is 666 upside down.
  • 27 years pass before The Loser's Club must face Pennywise once again. 9×3=27, 999 is 666 upside down.
  • [Cameo] (Stephen King): old man who sells Bill his old bike.
  • A recurring criticism about Stephen King's novels is his lack of inspiration for endings, even in otherwise well-acclaimed novels. This is repeatedly addressed in the movie, where Bill receives the same comments about his books (even from King in person).
  • The ending of the movie differs than the book, in that Pennywise is revealed to be a female spider in its most true form to humans and the Loser Club must destroy all the eggs that were laid because they're about to hatch.
  • The smoke hole scene that Mike mentions happened in the book when the Losers' Club were kids. It was originally meant to appear in It (2017) but it had to be cut due to budget constraints. It was moved to the sequel instead, now occurring in the adult timeline (some time before the start of the film).
  • Maturin The Turtle, one of the gate guardians of the Dark Tower is referenced again in Chapter 2. In the book, Maturin is the one that tells the kids how to perform the Ritual of Chüd to kill It.
  • In the book and this film, Bev and Ben end up together. But Bev and Bill do have an affair in the novel.
  • In the book, Stan is the one that sees the Deadlights, which looking at makes you go crazy, this being the reason why he kills himself when the memories rush back to him.
  • The shop owner played by Stephen King is seen drinking mate (a typical Argentine infusion) from a cup that appears in the foreground in a couple of takes, which is decorated with the CAI (Club Atlético Independiente) football team colors and logo. Director Andy Muschietti is from Argentina, and a CAI supporter. The football team is known as "Los Diablos Rojos" (The Red Devils).
  • Eddie's death in the book was a bit more gruesome than in the film. In the book, It bites Eddie's arm off and tosses him aside. Eddie then dies of shock from pain and blood loss. In the film, when the Losers are standing around the very weakened Pennywise, Richie approaches and rips one of It's arms off.
  • Towards the end, Pennywise takes the form of the deceased Stanley Uris' head. The head soon grows insect-like legs and begins to crawl after them. This is an obvious homage to John Carpenter's The Thing (1982), especially apparent in the way that the creature is back-lit by their flashlights; upon seeing the spider-head creature, Richie even makes the same exclamation as the Palmer character does in The Thing. Carpenter previously directed the Stephen King adaptation Christine (1983).
  • During the final battle, Richie calls Pennywise a "sloppy bitch". This is a reference to an interview of Bill Hader on Conan (2010) where Hader revealed he would call his friend that when they would beat him at "Goldeneye".
  • In the book and TV movie, the line, "Beep, Beep Richie." was a way to tell Richie to stop talking. In Chapter One, this is only spoken by Pennywise, with no explanation. However due to fan outcry, it was added in a moment between Bev and Richie in Chapter Two.
  • The room where Bill is typing at the end of the film when he gets the call from Mike, is the same room from Stand by Me (1986).
  • When Beverly (Jessica Chastain) is in the bathroom stall and the door is repeatedly busted open, young Henry Bowers pokes his head in and says, "Here's Johnny", exactly like Jack Torrance (Jack Nicholson) in The Shining (1980), another Stephen King adaptation.
  • When Richie (Bill Hader) sees the Stanley-spider, he says, "You've got to be fucking kidding." In John Carpenter's The Thing (1982), a character says the exact same line reacting to a similar spider-head creature.
  • Near the end of the film, the character of Richie (Bill Hader) is revealed to be a closeted gay or possibly bisexual man when he re-carves the letters "R + E" into the same old fence that Young Richie (Finn Wolfhard) carved it into in the middle of the film. The "R" stands for Richie, and the "E" stands for Eddie (Jack Dylan Grazer/James Ransone). While some fans have interpreted Richie as gay or bisexual in the novel, Stephen King has said that he did not write him as such. But King has expressed approval of the film's change.
  • During the finale, Richie (Bill Hader) throws a stone at Pennywise in his original spider-like form, with little effect. In the finale of the miniseries It (1990), Beverly incapacitates Spider-It with relative ease, by catapulting a stone into its chest.
  • Stan's Bar Mitzvah scene was originally filmed for It (2017), but only brief shots from it were used in the film (the full scene was made available on the BluRay edition). The sequel contains the full scene as a flashback, but apparently with different takes used.
  • Near the end of the film, James McAvoy has a conversation with his younger self (actually Pennywise taking that form). This is not the first time that McAvoy meets a version of himself from another time period: in X-Men: Days of Future Past (2014), he speaks with his older self.
  • In the book, Bill's wife and Beverly's abusive husband back their own way to Derry, resulting in a more expansive story of IT taking advantage of the 3 of them, and having Bill's wife look into the Dead Lights. This is left out in the movie, probably due to the existing length of the movie.
  • Despite an apparent death in the novel, Pennywise has been seen or mentioned in the novels of The Tommyknockers (1993) (Tommy sees a "clown with shiny silver dollar eyes" in the sewers and hallucinates red balloons), Dreamcatcher (2003) (a plaque dedicated to the victims of a flood that occurred during the final battle is vandalized with "PENNYWISE LIVES"), and 11.22.63 (2016) (after Jake meets Richie and Bev after the childhood battle Pennywise taunts him about the time-portal).
  • A turtle can be spotted on the desk of Ben's classroom in his flashback sequence, a nod to Maturin the turtle from the book and rival of It.
  • 27 years pass before The Loser's Club must face Pennywise again. 9×3=27, 999 is 666 upside down.
  • A reference is made to the 1982 John Carpenter film, The Thing (1982) when Stanley's head mutates into a crablike creature. Coincidentally, Stanley's original adult actor from the 1990 miniseries, Richard Masur, made an appearance in Carpenter's film and this may be a nod to the actor himself.
  • In Henry Bowers' room at the psychiatric hospital, there are several pictures of the moon above Henry's bed. In the novel, Pennywise's face appears in the moon and communicates with Henry.
  • 27 years pass before The Loser's Club must face Pennywise again. 9×3=27, 999 is 666 upside down.
  • During a flashback to the underground club house, young Stanley offers young Richie a shower cap to keep spiders off his head, which Richie declines, claiming he is not afraid of spiders. Near the end of the movie, It takes the form of young Stanley's severed head, which sprouts spider legs and proceeds to drop down onto adult Richie's head.
  • The climax of the book and movie are much different. In the book, Mike is severely wounded after his encounter with Henry Bowers and unable to join the remaining Losers in the sewers for the final battle against Pennywise. Stanley Uris also dies without leaving a suicide note or sending a letter to the rest of the group. Also, the Losers do begin to forget their memories again after parting ways. Whereas in the movie, it's implied that they keep in contact with one another judging by the scene where Mike and Bill talk over the phone after the events.
  • 4500 gallons of fake blood were used in Beverly's toilet cubicle scene at the climax, a world record for a theatrical production.
  • Although given top billing, Andy Bean had less than five minutes of screen time including the closing speech (in letter form) to other Losers Club members.
  • 27 years pass before The Loser's Club must face Pennywise again. 9×3=27, 999 is 666 upside down.
  • Body Count: 8 (Including Pennywise)
  • 27 years pass before The Loser's Club must face Pennywise again. 9 × 3 = 27, 999 is 666 upside down.
  • During the scene where the little creatures come out of the fortune cookies and attack The Losers, Mike keeps saying, "This isn't real." He says this in a similar manner as Nancy did in A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) before Freddy Krueger busts through her door and attacks her during one of her dreams.
  • During one of the flashbacks concerning Ben in summer school, he is chased by Pennywise throughout the darkened school's hallways that have a huge light shining at the end of the halls. The scene looks strikingly similar to the beginning of A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) where Tina is running down a darkened hallway that has a huge light shining at the end of the hall.
  • The beginning of the film had upset many members of the LGBTQ community, due to a gay character ending up being brutally attacked by local teenagers and then brutally murdered by Pennywise. Some people have mentioned that the scene had happened in the original novel as well and it was meant to show how bad of a place Derry truly is. Also, not only did this scene appear in the novel, it was based on a true story. In 1984, Charlie Howard, a gay man, was killed by a group of teens in Bangor, ME. Howard was thrown off the State Street Bridge into the Kenduskeag Stream canal, where he drowned.
  • Like the first film, though this film has left out some things in the novel, there are things that occurred in the film that never happened in the novel. This include: * Henry Bowers specifically attacking Eddie by stabbing him in the face and Eddie stabbing him in the chest which didn't kill him. * The Losers searching for their tokens for the Ritual of Chud. * Bill trying and failing to protect Dean, the little boy who lived in his old house. * Mike being with his friends when they defeated Pennywise and being the one who pulls his/Its heart out. * The revelation of Richie's sexuality being subtly revealed as either gay or bisexual, which Stephen King has admitted was never intended to be implicated from the book. * Stanley's posthumous letters to his friends in which it's revealed that his suicide was to actually give them a fighting chance at defeating Pennywise/It and asking them to live their lives to the fullest. * Mike leaving Derry. * The Losers retaining their memories.
  • Though this film along with its predecessor, It (2017), and the It (1990) miniseries are adaptations of the same novel, they have similar scenes that played out and arranged in different manners from one another as well as the novel. For instance: * In the miniseries, Mike is seen taking in all of the chaos concerning the death of the little girl before he makes a decision to call his friends. In this film, Mike is seen taking in all of the chaos concerning the death of the teenage boy before he makes a decision to call his friends. * In the miniseries, Stanley's suicide scene is presented as a bit more straightforward. The scene shows he wrote 'IT' on his wall in his blood before he dies. In this film, Stanley's suicide scene is presented as more emotional. He still writes 'IT' on his wall, but later, his last thoughts are shown as him thinking about his friends as he dies. * In the miniseries, during the scene where Beverly gets ready to return to Derry and is arguing with her husband, he slaps her to which she responds by punching him in the face which reduces him to tears. In this film, somewhat similar to the novel, during the scene where Beverly gets ready to return to Derry and her husband tries to stop her due to his jealousy, he ends up beating her with a belt and punching her to which she responds by scratching him, kicking him, and hitting him hard in the face with a glass frame which shatters causing serious, bloody injuries to his face and head, and somewhat incapacitates him. * In the miniseries, Bill is the first to show up in Derry and meets up with Mike in the town's library. In this film, Bill is the first to show up in Derry and meets up with Mike, but this time, it's at the Chinese restaurant. * During the climactic ending in the miniseries, The Losers (Bill, Bev, Ben, and Richie) tackles Pennywise, who's in his actual form to the human which is a gigantic spider, and they rip Its heart out together off-screen. During the climactic scene in this movie, The Losers (Bill, Bev, Ben, Mike, and Richie) takes down Pennywise by taunting him and rendering him physically small, and Mike pulls his/Its heart out and he, along with his friends, squishes the heart.
  • At the end of the film, the Losers defeat Pennywise/It by overcoming their fears and taunt and cuss him out in order to literally reduce him into small, infant-sized since It feeds off of their fears and insecurities. This is somewhat similar to the ending of A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) in which Nancy overcomes her fears, and taunt and cuss out Freddy Krueger. Thus rendering him useless when he tries to attack her again yet ends up going right through her and disappearing. The method (momentarily) worked.
  • Throughout most of the film, Ritchie wears a dark yellow buttoned-down shirt with small red cross shapes. The shirt is similar looking to the shirt that Jesse wears during the iconic scene where he's dancing strangely and he and Lisa reading Nancy's misplaced diary in A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy's Revenge (1985). Jesse's shirt was a light yellow buttoned-down shirt with large black cross shapes. This was pointed out by writer and producer B.J. Colangelo on Twitter. It was also noted that similarly, both characters' arcs involved the subtle revelation that they're closeted gay men which in return is used against them by Pennywise and Freddy Krueger, respectively.
  • In one of the flashback scenes where Ben is in summer school, he is chased by Pennywise throughout the school's hallways. He ends up hiding in one of the lockers and peaks through the slits to see if Pennywise was still out there searching for him. Some moments later, Pennywise is revealed to be in the locker with Ben which prompts him to run out of the locker while Pennywise taunts him as he dramatically exits the locker after him. This scene is similar to the scene in A Nightmare on Elm Street (2010), the remake of 1984's A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984), where Nancy is hiding from Freddy Krueger in a dream near the end of the film. Nancy ends up hiding in a closet and peaks through the slits. Unlike Ben not seeing Pennywise through the slits in this film, Nancy does see Freddy searching for her, turning toward the door, and walking right up to it before he disappears as she backs away. Then, a moment later, Freddy is revealed to be in the closet with Nancy which prompts her to nearly bust out through the closet door while Freddy grabs after her as he slowly exits the closet.
  • During the dinner scene at the Chinese restaurant, The Losers see the little creatures come out of the fortune cookies and are attacked by them. These creatures have baby-like faces and emit distorted sounds of infants crying. This symbolized the fact that none of The Losers weny on to have any children of their own. The reason for that is most likely due to their shared childhood trauma of dealing with Pennywise among other traumatic situations (i.e. child abuse, bullying) and not being able to let go of that childhood trauma as they grew up.
  • Unlike in the novel and miniseries, when Stan commits suicide, he doesn't smear the wall near his bathtub with his blood that spells "It". Instead, he simply gets into the tub and slit his wrists. Also, his last thoughts are of Bill and the sadness of disappointing him and the rest of their friends by not showing up to fulfill his part of their oath.
  • 27 years pass before The Loser's Club must face Pennywise again. 9×3=27, 999 is 666 upside down.
  • The end of the novel leaves the fate of Pennywise ambiguous, and even the first line of the story hints that he may be still alive. However, author Stephen King has sworn to never write about Pennywise again, stating that the character is too scary, even for him.
  • Its most true form is bright orange lights that exists in the "Macroverse" called Dead Lights. Seeing these will cause any human to go insane. They make brief appearances in Chapter One when Pennywise opens his mouth while holding onto Bev and in this film when he opens his mouth during the climax in an attempt to kill Richie.
  • In the first film, a balloon with "I Heart Derry" on it appears when Patrick Hockstetter meets his demise.
  • The death of Adrian Mellon is said to be one of the most disturbing scenes in the entire film.
  • In the novel, Audra (Bill's wife) is taken by Pennywise and left in a catatonic state, like Beverly in the first film.
  • In the novel, after the Losers defeat Pennywise, Bill is finally able to wake his wife, Audra, by taking her on a ride on his childhood bike, Silver.
  • In the novel, Beverly's husband follows her to Derry, seeking revenge for her leaving him, but dies when he sees Pennywise in his true form.
  • Like the first film, this film references A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child (1989) as one of the films playing at the Derry movie theater in 1989. This is shown during the flashback toward the end of the film where The Losers are walking their bikes home together after defeating Pennywise the first time. It's noted that both It (2017) and A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984), as well as their sequels and variations, share striking similarities in terms of concept, plot, and the main villain. These similarities involve a demonic child murderer with the ability to evoke fear through supernatural and psychological means, to manipulate or possess people, warp reality, shapeshifts in accordance to one's fears as well as the guises of lost loved ones, has superhuman strength, and mainly preys upon children and teenagers. Furthermore, in both cases, the eldritch antagonist exhibits an unpredictable and sadistic type of personality and enjoys engaging in sick and twisted humor. It's also noted that both horror properties share the theme of fear.
  • Mike is the only character who doesn't cry at the end of this film and the first film. This is because he has to be stronger than the other Losers.
  • There is a theory that Dean, the little boy whom Bill tried to protect from Pennywise, wasn't real but was actually Pennywise the entire time.
  • Mike Hanlon's parents don't die in a fire in King's novel.
  • A rivalry between Mike's father, Will, and Henry Bowers' father, Butch, ignites the conflict between the two boys.
  • In the novel, Mike's father does talk about a time he narrowly escaped a fire at The Black Spot, a nightclub frequented by African American soldiers. The club was burnt down by a group of white supremacists.
  • In King's novel, the young Losers defeat Pennywise with the assistance of Maturin, an enormous turtle who resides in the Macroverse.
  • The turtle and clown are opposing forces, good versus evil.
  • In the novel, Maturin advises the Losers to perform the Ritual of Chüd to defeat Pennywise. The ritual is a psychic battle in which two entities duel and harness the supernatural abilities of silver to destroy It.
  • Judging by some of his scenes, it's implied that Ben may be an alcoholic.
  • IT's true Earthly physical form is that of a giant spider. Outside of our human universe, IT exists as a mass of lights called the Deadlights.
  • When IT is defeated in the novel, the entire town of Derry is destroyed, implying that not only does IT reside in the town, IT IS the town.
  • Despite not being part of the description for the film's R rating from the MPAA, nudity is also present in the film. The scenes that showcase this are adult Stanley getting into the bathtub and adult Beverly being chased by It in the form of a grotesque creature in her old home. Albeit, the nudity varies in both scenes.
  • After Adrien Mellon is killed and Mike is on the bridge you can see Don, Adrien's boyfriend, sitting by an ambulance and you can just hear him tell a police officer, "It was a fucking clown!" This is a reference to the police interrogation scene in the book how the police officer got him to leave the clown out of his statement
  • Around 1 hr 16 mins 30 secs, Pennywise sings a song for Richie implying that he knows his dirty, little secret. This could be a reference to the fact that Pennywise knows that Richie is gay or bisexual as it is shown that he loved Eddie near the end.
  • At the dinner scene each of the losers receive a different singular word when they open their fortune cookies, spelling out the message Guess Stanley Could Not Cut It. Eddie is Could, Richie is Guess, Mike is It, Beverly is Stanley, leaving Not and Cut, but between Bill and Ben it's unclear who receives which word due to the different camera angles.
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