Hello, Dolly! 50th Anniversary (1969) presented by TCM Movie Poster

Goofs from Hello, Dolly! 50th Anniversary (1969) presented by TCM

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  • When Dolly is purchasing her ticket to Yonkers, she hands the cashier the money twice.
  • In Harmonia Gardens, after Cornelius says that he is "Gonna become a honest man and tell the truth," he puts the bottle on the table and goes to sit near Irene, holding the drinking cup. When he sits down the drinking cup has disappeared.
  • In the park during "It Only Takes a Moment," the group of bystanders starts to sing. There are only 9 people, and only 3 of them women, yet the chorus heard is clearly much bigger and much more female.
  • During the dancing lesson that Dolly gives Barnaby, Irene and Minnie return from changing their clothes and Minnie Fay's dress alternates repeatedly from full-length to three-quarter-length until they all dance out the door.
  • During the 'Elegance' sequence, the hem on the back Irene's dress gets dirtier and dirtier as they walk to Harmonia Gardens. Inside the restaurant, the hemline is spotless.
  • The Budweiser Clydesdales and beer wagon appear in the 14th street parade. They were not formed until 1933, well after the period in which Hello Dolly is set.
  • During the "Hello Dolly" song at Harmonia Gardens towards the end of the movie, she's singing with Louis Armstrong, after they do their exaggerated "yeah..." she's supposed to sing "Dolly will never go away..." Her voice sings the word "will" in that phrase, but her mouth does not.
  • Near the finale of "Dancing," the female dancers leap forward over a park bench via a low platform behind it. In the following wide shot, this riser has disappeared.
  • When Horace is marching in the parade, Dolly approaches him to talk so he holds the sword upward on his right shoulder. Between cuts, when she talks about dinner at Harmonia Gardens, the sword disappears repeatedly.
  • In the hat shop Dolly takes a metal tin of mints out of her purse. When the shot changes, she takes it out again.
  • After sitting down for dinner at Harmonia Gardens, Dolly Levi takes the napkin off her plate twice; once in close up and once in long shot.
  • In the chase sequence in the Harmonia Gardens restaurant, Horace Vandergelder is seen entering the fireman's pole in an anticlockwise direction. When he exits at the bottom he does so in a clockwise direction.
  • During the Harmonia Gardens scenes, the waiters are carrying trays that have small handles. The handles disappear and then reappear numerous times during the scene.
  • In the dance sequence "Elegance", Irene Molloy puts a top hat over the feather already on her head. In subsequent shots, the amount of exposed feather changes between shots.
  • During the "Elegance" number, Minnie Fay hands her money to the woman selling pretzels twice.
  • When the opening credits roll and the names of art directors Jack Martin Smith and Herman A. Blumenthal appear, trailed by costume designer Irene Sharaff, you can see signs for the New York Thruway in the upper left corner.
  • The red-carpeted staircase at the Harmonia Gardens restaurant has brass carpet rods on each stair during all of the scenes prior to the arrival of Dolly Levi. When she arrives and they sing "Hello, Dolly," the carpet rods are gone.
  • When Horace Vandergelder is being shaved, the barber shaves once side of his face twice, removing all the lather both times.
  • At the railway ticket window in NYC, the existing line of ticket buyers disappears in the shot from inside the ticket taker's office. The line re-appears in the shots outside the office.
  • While approaching the railway ticket counter she hands a card to every other person in line, but when directing them to look at the car they each have one.
  • During the opening credits, a scene shows the Train passing a boat on the river. The boat clearly has an exhaust funnel and is pumping out bilge water. The film is set in 1890, and diesel engines for boats didn't exist until 1897, and electric bilge pumps weren't common on many boats until the 1940s (the were more commonly used on large naval/merchant vessels).
  • During the opening sequence: When "Based On The Stage Play 'Hello Dolly' Produced by David Merrick and Book of Stage Play by Michael Stewart" comes on the screen, you can see in the background an interstate highway going around the base of the tall hill with cars whizzing by.
  • After Horace leaves for New York, Dolly is wandering around in the store. Just before she walks out of the door, she slings her purse over her right shoulder and holds it with her right hand, but when the angle cuts to her coming out of the door, she is holding her purse with both hands down in front of her.
  • During the number "Put on Your Sunday Clothes" - a few minutes into the number - Dolly, Emergarde and Ambrose do a high step down a flight of stairs in front of Vandengelder's Hay and Feed. The camera changes angle and across the bay, where there is a highway, there are modern era (1969) cars and trucks whizzing by.
  • When Dolly comes down stairs of Harmonia Gardens, her dress has a train that trails several steps behind her, but by time she reaches bottom, train has disappeared - a mid-scene alteration allegedly made necessary by Streisand's difficulty in dancing with the trailing gown.
  • During opening credits, as Walter Matthau's name appears, a couple of wrecked modern automobiles (circa 1960s) can be seen dumped in foliage to right of railroad track.
  • "Entr'acte" is incorrectly spelled "Entre'Acte"
  • When Horace joins Dolly at her table, she spoons a great deal of food onto his plate, including lots of beets, but when the camera angle changes to behind Horace, there is very little food on his plate and no beets are there.
  • During most of the song "It Takes a Woman", one man is standing behind the horse and the remainder of them are either to the right of the horse (from the audience's perspective) or directly in front of it. Toward the end of the song the camera angle changes and suddenly there are several men to the left of the horse.
  • Modern electrical power transformers are visible on the utility poles in the Yonkers scenes.
  • During the opening still, there is a title card stating "New York City 1890". In the background is a horse-drawn Bekins moving van. According to the Bekins website, they weren't founded until 1891 in Des Moines, Iowa.
  • Yonkers is North of New York City, and both are on the East side of the Hudson River, . But in some aerial scenes of the train from New York City to Yonkers, the river is on the train's right side. A Southbound train was filmed.
  • During the parade, all the flags are depicted as having 50 stars. There should either be 42 stars or 44 stars on the flags. Idaho and Wyoming became the 43rd and 44th states in 1890.
  • All of the food and drinks on the waiters' trays are obviously glued on during the dance number at Harmonia Gardens.
  • During the parade the order of the various groups change position from time to time.
  • In the final scene when Dolly steps from the side walk onto the grass hurrying to be with Horace who is waiting for her on the church steps there isn't anything on the lake in the background until the very ending of the song after a couple of close-ups when they zoom out and 2 sailboats can be seen that wouldn't have had the time to get out on the lake as far as they are.
  • When Irene and Minnie meet up with Cornelius and Barnaby at Harmonia Gardens they say "We're here" and "Hello" (in a two shot of Irene and Minnie respectively) they then switch to a two shot of Cornelius and Barnaby (when Barnaby tips his cap ) and Cornelius is behind Barnaby's left shoulder. Then the shot changes to a side group shot (where Cornelius kisses Irene's hand) but now his body has jumped a little in front of Barnaby's..
  • There are several shots of the orchestra in the Harmonia Gardens during which no conductor can be seen, yet right before his duet with Streisand, Louis Armstrong suddenly appears conducting the orchestra before turning to join Dolly in singing. Later, he disappears once again.
  • In the final wedding scene, Dolly comes down the hill dancing on a pathway/sidewalk that definitely is made of asphalt which was not around in 1890. Brick or stone would have been the usual material, but in a country location like this, dirt or gravel would have been used.
  • Once the duet between Dolly and the bandleader (Louis Armstrong) is done and Dolly dances away with the waiters, as Louis waves goodbye a blonde dancer smacks him in the hand very noticeably.
  • When Dolly arrives in Yonkers and starts chatting with Horace after It Takes A woman, Horace talks about not seeing 40, 35 again and Dolly starts opening her purse to put away the gloves in it; the camera cuts away to a frontal view and the gloves are already put away when she says 35; at the same time there were men inside the barn working the hay piles, they vanish in the front shot as well.
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