Glory (1989) Movie Poster

Trivia for Glory (1989)

Showing all 56 items
Jump to: Spoilers (9)
  • Many of the first shots were taken from the 125th anniversary reenactment of the Battle of Gettysburg in 1988. Up to 15,000 participants took part. The scenes filmed at the Gettysburg Reenactment were fused into the Battle of Antietam scene which was filmed in Mcdonough, Georgia. Some shots show the browner dry summer background of Pennsylvania in 1988, others show the greener spring background of Georgia in 1989.
  • The inaugural battle for the real 54th Massachusetts was at James Island, South Carolina, on July 16, 1863. The scene depicting the battle was filmed during late February 1989, at the Girl Scout Camp on Rose Dhu Island, near Savannah, Georgia. It snowed during filming, and heaters had to be brought in to melt the snow. Later, in the "Christmas at Camp Readville" scene, filmed in March 1989 at the old Train Roundhouse in Savannah, Georgia, snow blowers were brought in to blow chipped ice onto the ground, to give the appearance of winter snow.
  • Edward Zwick and his effects crew used lycopodium powder to simulate realistic shell bursts. It ignites instantly when puffed into a naked flame, producing a phosphorescent ball of light for a split second.
  • Many scenes/subplots were cut out from both the theatrical version and the DVD, including Shaw and Cabot Forbes attending school together. Nearly all of Jane Alexander's scenes were cut.
  • (Cameo) Jane Alexander: Robert Gould Shaw's mother.
  • Jane Alexander's brief cameo was intended to be much bigger, as evidenced by early poster and trailer credits highlighting her name.
  • The majority of Cary Elwes' scenes were cut from the film.
  • (Cameo) Lance Norris: a man in the crowd as the troops march through Boston.
  • Very early in the movie, Union soldiers play baseball. Considerable dispute remains about exactly when, where, and how the sport was invented, but the Civil War itself had a significant role in the sport's rapid growth. It became a popular pastime for soldiers on both sides of the Mason-Dixon line, who spread it around the country.
  • The relief sculpture in the credits is the Robert Gould Shaw and 54th Regiment Memorial in Boston Common, by Augustus Saint-Gaudens. It's located on the Common, on the left side of the steps leading up to the Beacon Street entrance of the gold domed Massachusetts State Capitol.
  • The scenes for the party were filmed in the Savannah home of Jim Williams, the man whose history was the basis for the book and film Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil (1997).
  • (Cameo) Kevin Jarre: the white soldier who shouts "Give 'em hell, 54!"
  • Andre Braugher's feature film debut.
  • According to Edward Zwick, Matthew Broderick and Cary Elwes did not get along during filming.
  • Although it's not shown in the film, Robert Gould Shaw married Anna Kneeland Haggerty a few months before the 54th Massachusetts was sent to South Carolina.
  • This film has one of the longest credit rolls in history. The credits following the movie run a full ten minutes and were shipped to theaters on a separate reel. The film's cast is displayed three times, each in a different layout.
  • "Films in Review," usually devoted to film history, released a two-part article on this film by Charles Sawyer, who was an extra, in its December 1989 and January 1990 issues.
  • Kevin Jarre was inspired to write the screenplay when he encountered a monument to Robert Gould Shaw on Boston Common. The monument is shown in the closing credits.
  • While this is the first major motion picture to acknowledge that African-Americans had their own unit in the American Civil War, the subject had been referred to in other films, such as Shenandoah (1965).
  • In the U.S., this was the 45th biggest grossing film of 1989.
  • The Civil War reenactors who took part in the film did so voluntarily and without pay.
  • Edward Zwick was initially apprehensive about how the African-American cast would feel about a young, white, Jewish director telling a crucial part of their history. He found the cast to be very affable and good-humored towards him. Some were grateful that he was brave enough to tackle the subject.
  • Fog machines were used throughout the production to eradicate any signs of blue sky. Edward Zwick wanted the film to look as bleak as possible.
  • Matthew Broderick bears a strong physical resemblance to the real Robert Gould Shaw.
  • Matthew Broderick's facial hair is gradually darkened throughout the movie to give the impression that he has become older and more seasoned.
  • This is Debbie Allen's favorite film.
  • Morgan Freeman did all of his own stunts.
  • Included among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", edited by Steven Schneider.
  • This is one of five films whose purely orchestral soundtracks won the Grammy Award for Best Score despite not being nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Score. The others are Anatomy of a Murder (1959), Crimson Tide (1995), Independence Day (1996), and The Dark Knight (2008).
  • Matthew Broderick claimed that the battle scenes didn't require much acting because he was genuinely afraid of the extremely loud explosions on-set.
  • Morgan Freeman used his experience in the Air Force to inform how relationships would be formed in the unit. Freeman claimed that no one becomes fast friends during training, but partnerships are made according to strengths.
  • Edward Zwick claimed that, for the flogging scene, Denzel Washington was lashed at full contact with a special whip that would not cut his back, but still stung. For the final take of the scene, Zwick hesitated to call "Cut!" to signal the flogging to stop, and the result was Washington's spontaneous tear down his cheek.
  • The Fort Wagner scenes include many white reenactors. In real life, the 54th was supported by the 62nd and 67th Ohio, both white regiments. Brigadier General George Crockett Strong, commander of the troops who made the assault, was mortally wounded in the assault.
  • The movie unites two actors who played Malcolm X. Morgan Freeman played him in Death of a Prophet (1981), Denzel Washington played him in Malcolm X (1992).
  • Near the end during the Battle of Fort Wagner, Thomas uses the same bayonet technique on an enemy that Sergeant Mulcahy used on him during basic training.
  • When shown in training in Readville, MA, a wagon rolls through with crossed sabers and the number 2 above the cross point, indicating it belongs to the 2nd Massachusetts cavalry. The regimental commander of the 2nd Mass. Cavalry, James Russell Lowell, married Robert Shaw's sister after Shaw's death. The 2nd Mass. contained 5 companies of men recruited from California, known collectively as the "California Battalion."
  • Included among the American Film Institute's 1998 list of the 400 movies nominated for the Top 100 Greatest American Movies.
  • During the meeting before the Regiment's first battle, Col. Montgomery plays "Prince of Denmark's March" on the piano.
  • The film was released in theaters on December 15, 1989, the same day as Family Business (1989), another movie featuring Matthew Broderick. Both films were distributed by TriStar Pictures.
  • James Horner's end title music is also in the theatrical trailer for Backdraft (1991).
  • The Battle of Antietam and the Union camp life scenes leading up to it were the final scenes shot.
  • A nearly identical replica of the famous Dunker Church was set up for the Antietam battle sequence. Filmmakers also used it to shoot scenes of Shaw and Thomas playing outside as young children. Only the hospital scene made it into the finished film.
  • All of the Confederate reenactors left on set for the final Fort Wagner sequence are in the last shot of the two cannons firing.
  • Denzel Washington was initially opposed to appearing in the film until he realized it gave him a shot at portraying a fully fleshed-out character.
  • The film was shot over a period of 10 weeks.
  • Cary Elwes and Morgan Freeman later appeared in Kiss the Girls (1997).
  • The film opens with a voice-over by Shaw writing a letter to his mother with martial music playing and the Army of the Potomac enjoying their day before preparing for battle. The letter ends with "You mustn't think that any of us are going to be killed. They are collecting such a force here that an attack would be insane." A short while later, the title card appears, "Antietam Creek, Maryland". Shaw just marched into the bloodiest single day in American history.

Spoilers

  • Robert Gould Shaw and Charles Fessenden Morse were the only two soldiers, whose real names were used in the movie. Morse, however, was not part of the 54th Massachusetts in real life. Cabot Forbes was based on Edward Needles Hallowell, who led the 54th after Shaw died.
  • According to several historical sources, Robert Gould Shaw was shot through the heart and fell into Fort Wagner rather than falling outside of it. His men went in after him, and many were killed.
  • In the attack on Fort Wagner, nearly half the regiment was killed, wounded, or captured. For his bravery in the battle, Sergeant William H. Carney became the first African-American to earn the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military award. It was finally given to him 37 years later.
  • The lines spoken by Colonel Montgomery to the outraged Colonel Shaw when he orders the burning of Darien, "Secession has got to be swept away by the hand of God like the Jews of old," are Montgomery's actual words, quoted in a letter from the real Robert Gould Shaw to his family.
  • In real life, Brigadier General George Crockett Strong addressed the 54th Massachusetts on the beach before their assault on Fort Wagner. General Strong, the brigade commander, pointed to the 54th's flag bearer as asked, "If this man should fall, who will lift the flag and carry it on? Colonel Robert Gould Shaw replied, "I will!" General Strong was mortally wounded by shrapnel in the assault on Fort Wagner. He was taken to New York City, where he died of tetanus two weeks later.
  • At the end of the film, Colonel Robert Gould Shaw's body is thrown into the mass grave with the black soldiers. Normally, officers were given formal burials, but the Confederacy had such contempt for the black regiment that the officers were thrown in with the regular soldiers, and no honors were rendered. After the war, Shaw's parents visited the site of Fort Wagner in South Carolina. When asked if they wished to have their son's body exhumed so they could take it home to Boston for burial, they declined. "We would not have his body removed from where it lies, surrounded by his brave and devoted soldiers," explained Shaw's father, Francis George Shaw. "We can imagine no holier place than that in which he lies, among his brave and devoted followers, nor wish for him better company. What a bodyguard he has!"
  • Edward Zwick deliberately decided to put the film's goriest shot, a soldier's head being blown off, right at the start of the film, to prepare audiences for the terrifying onslaught of battle.
  • Matthew Broderick was always Edward Zwick's first choice for the part of Robert Gould Shaw.
  • The real Colonel Shaw was witnessed releasing his horse before leading the suicidal charge on Fort Wagner, as depicted onscreen.
Movie details provided by