Ford v Ferrari Movie Poster

Goofs from Ford v Ferrari

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  • Carroll Shelby is awakened at 830am and his face is shown in close-up. His face is perfectly clean shaven despite having slept all night.
  • The theme to the second season of "I Dream Of Jeannie" is being played on the TV in the Miles family home when Ken Miles starts testing the Ford GT40 for its first (unsuccessful) crack at Le Mans in the summer of 1965. However, the second season only made its debut in autumn/fall 1966.
  • In selling Ken Miles as a driver, Carroll Shelby says that Miles drove a tank from the beaches of D-Day to Berlin. The first part is true, but the second is not. The British Army never reached Berlin since the Red Army got there first.
  • When we first encounter Carroll Shelby and Ken Miles at Willow Springs (circa 1964), the song "Don't Bring Me Down" by the Animals is playing. It wasn't released for another two years on May 21, 1966, about a month before the 1966 Le Mans race.
  • Shelby's Los Angeles International Airport facility is shown in 1965, 1966, and 1967. The Mustangs in the shop are always 1965 GT350s.
  • One of the 1965 GT350s quite visible in the shop has a Mustang GT fog light bar in its grill, something not installed on 1965 or 1966 Shelby GT350s.
  • Ken Miles is shown listening to the 1965 Le Mans 24 hrs in a workshop in California. In reality he was driving one of the two 7 litre Ford GTs in the race.
  • The Ferrari pits at Le Mans are shown as being next to the Ford pits. In fact the pits at Le Mans were allocated in numerical order of the cars. The Fords ran numbers 1 to 8 and their pits were at the start of the pit block. The Ferraris ran numbers in the 20s and were located much further up the pit block.
  • As the PA announcer counts down from 10 to begin the race, he says (in French) six, five, *forty*, three, two, one.
  • Daytona did not have SAFER barriers until the early 2000's.
  • The sunglasses Matt Damons character wears throughout most of the movie are made by "Entourage of 7", their logo clearly visible on the temples. While the style of glasses is accurate for the period, this brand was only founded in 2007.
  • Dialog in the film between Shelby and Miles leads us to believe that Shelby didn't know why the GT40 had that name. That is absurd as Shelby was involved in the development of the car and well aware that the windshield height limitation was 40 inches.
  • Ken Miles' winning margin in the 1966 Daytona 24 Hours was 8 laps over the second Shelby entered Ford. The Holman & Moody entry driven by Walt Hansgen finished in third place, 1 lap further down.
  • Early in the movie (1964-ish?), in Ken Miles' shop, an MG can be clearly seen shod with Kumho branded tires. The company was actually named Samyang Tire until 1966. Kumho tires weren't imported into the United States until many years later, although they had ties with the US market and DOT certification.
  • While pitching his racing idea, in 1963, Lee Iacocca notes that James Bond does not drive a Ford and shows a photo of Sean Connery next to an Aston Martin DB5. However, James Bond did not acquire the Aston Martin until Goldfinger (1964).
  • The famous picture of the three Ford GT40's crossing the finish line at Le Mans in 1966 has them staggered a few yards from each other, not in a straight nose line.
  • The movie shows Ken Miles had already won 24 hours of Daytona and Shelby mentions that he also won the 12 Hours of Sebring. Miles was denied the unique achievement of winning Sebring, Daytona, and Le Mans in the same year. Since the McLaren/Amon #2 car had started some 20 yards behind the Miles/Hulme #1 Car, it had traveled a further distance, and Bruce McLaren and Chris Amon were declared the winners.
  • The original chassis were made by Lola who sold them to Ford. Ultimately Loia of Bromley under Eric Broadley made the T70 mid engine racer on similar principles. The name Lola is never mentioned but Peter Miles (Ken's son) has a plastic kit box on his shelf to make a Lola T70. In homage presumably.
  • There is a brown Mini in the background of Ken's garage. It has side repeaters which would be right for a US imported mini. I am not sure about the windows which look like a late ? 68 Australian Mini as it has wind up windows and quarter lights.
  • In real life, Enzo Ferrari was not in attendance at the 1966 24 Hours of Le Mans.
  • In reality, Carroll Shelby and Ken Miles were not involved in the Ford GT40 program until after the 1964 24 Hours of Le Mans.
  • In real life, Enzo Ferrari sold 50% of his company to Fiat S.p.A. in 1969, not in 1963 after declining Ford Motor Company's buyout offer.
  • There were only three Ford GT40s in the 1966 Daytona race. In the film there were at least four GT40s racing.
  • Trackside catch fencing was not in use at Le Mans in 1966, as shown in the film.
  • At the press conference, a cover is dramatically pulled off to unveil the new Mustang, but another Mustang has been on display through out the event.
  • Lee Iacocca's presentation to Henry Ford II to make an approach to Ferrari in 1963 has references to James Bond, as per an earlier reviewer here. One of the slides in the presentation shows Sean Connery standing next to the Aston Martin DB5 that made its first showing in Goldfinger, which was not released until 1964. The next slide from Iacocca's material has a Bond still from Thunderball, which premiered in 1965.
  • Mollie Miles tries to extract information from her husband, Ken, about why he was meeting up with Carroll Shelby behind her back when she had no idea of the Ford prototype he was rating with Shelby in 1964. She does this by driving recklessly to scare him. One of the cars she passes while doing so is a '65 / '66 Chrysler.
  • Many of the California license plates were shown in a three-number, then three-letter, format. California did not have plates in that format until about 1970, when they had exhausted the 1963 format of three-letter, three-number.
  • Carroll Shelby tosses a conventional lug nut into the Ferrari pit to cause confusion among the crew. But the actual Ferrari 330 P uses one central "knock off" nut per wheel. These are tightened and loosened with a lead hammer, as shown when the GT40 pits.
  • When Ford II and Shelby came to visit the Ferrari factory, this would have been in early 1963. Several models did not become available until a few years after that. This includes the 1964 275 GTB, parked outside the factory; the 1966 330 P3, that we later see in the film and the 1965 Dino 206 S, both parked in the factory floor.
  • The film depicts the race starting and closing on a bright sunny afternoon when in fact it began on a cool and cloudy day and finished on a dull and wet day.
  • At the night portion of the 24 hour race, Daytona appeared to have modern LED floodlights with modern high capacity grandstands. Daytona did not have floodlighting until the late 1990s, therefore the races would had took place in the dark, unlit except at the pits. Also, usual to any 24 hour endurance races, grandstands tends to be sparse at night and Daytona's grandstands were much smaller to how it is now.
  • It's obvious the airport used in the film was the Ontario international airport. The Los Angeles International Airportbuildings were CGI. The hangers they used are at the west end of of Ontario and the terminal and control tower are also seen. The 727 used has been sitting at the old terminal for years and used in other movies.
  • Although talks between Enzo Ferrari and Lee Iacocca collapsed in May 1963, the Italian photographer (Ottavio Taddei) is seen taking photos of the men using a Nikon F camera with a through-the-lens light meter, either a Nikon Tn or FTn model. Nikon respectively introduced these models in 1965 and 1968.
  • When Ken Miles is at Le Mans in 1966, Mollie Miles talks with her husband using a telephone handset with a modular jack. Phone companies did not use these jacks until the 1970s and 1980s.
  • Henry Ford showed Carrol Shelby the river rouge plant stating that 3 out of five bombers were built there in ww-2 In fact they were built at the willow run airport about 20 miles west of Detroit.
  • Lee Iacocca is shown dropping by the Shelby American facility and introducing himself. Iacocca and Shelby had actually met a few years earlier in a 1962 meeting at Ford's Dearborn headquarters.
  • During the Le Mans Race, American style telephone poles and street lights are visible. The telephone poles in France are made of metal while the ones seen are made of wood.
  • When Mrs. Miles is talking to Ken on the phone, the receiver clearly has a modular jack connecting the cord. Modular jacks did not start to appear on telephones until 1972.
  • It is noted that Shelby was the first American to have won Le Mans. He won the race in an Aston Martin, but Phil Hill, an even more celebrated American sports car and F1 driver, had won Me Mans the previous year -in a Ferrari.
  • The trunk of Miles' Cobra seen during the race sequence, formerly mangled by him, is no longer damaged. There would have been insufficient time to repair or replace.
  • A Shelby GT 350 Mustang is shown (side view) in the airplane hangar in a Ford color called 'Dynasty Green' ('65) or Timberline Green ('66). Neither of which was offered on Shelby GT 350's. Only one green was offered by Shelby in 1966, it was a dark green, called "Ivy Green".
  • During Lee Iaccoca's presentation to Henry Ford II to approach Ferrari in 1963, ad layouts for the full size '65 Fords may be seen on one wall of the meeting room. No ad agency would be allowed access to new models more than a year from release.
  • When Shelby and Miles are brawling across the street from the Miles home, among the scattered groceries one can clearly see a loaf of Wonder Bread Classic. Classics are intended for nostalgia appeal, something from the old days-- but this IS the old days! Wonder Bread was just Wonder Bread in the 60s, and wasn't labeled 'Classic' until the 21st century.
  • When Carroll Shelby drives away from the doctor's office in an early scene, his red Porsche is equipped with black windshield wipers not correct for the period.
  • Several of the Shelby Cobras and Daytona's have large diameter custom wheels which weren't made until the 2000's.
  • At the start of the 1966 Le Mans race, a #29 Ferrari 250 GTO in red with blue stripes can be seen crashing and flipping over. That car in fact was a 275 GTB/C, finishing 8th and winning its class. As incorrect as this was it's blue hue on it's stripe, heavily resembles that of Maranello Concessionaires (Ferrari's British representative), which was in pale blue.
  • At the start of the Le Mans race, a red Ferrari 250 GTO crashed in front of Miles. Later another 250 GTO, a #18 of NART (Ferrari's American representative), was shown to being involved in a collision with an upturned and burning yellow 275 GTB/C, causing a #20 Ferrari 330 P3 to crash. The #18 car was in fact a Ferrari 365 P2, which was a prototype and retired with a broken transmission into the night (at the 9th hour). No 250 GTO has competed since 1964. The only yellow front-engined coupe taking part was a #57 275 GTB/C of Ecurie Francorchamps (Ferrari's Belgian representative), which finished 10th. Of the three 275 GTB/Cs in the race, only one retired with a broken clutch into the 20th hour.
  • Towards the closing part of the race, Miles can be shown passing a #35 blue w/ white stripes Porsche 911 S, featuring wipers, American spec headlights, and sidelights which featured in models 1968 onward. The actual car was in fact red with Stuttgart plates with large horn grilles like in earlier models, unlike the movie car.
  • When Ford II and Shelby came to visit the Ferrari factory floor in 1963, a Ferrari 246 Formula One car, last used in the 1960 season, was present at the background on the factory floor. As F1 regulations centered on 1.5-liter cars after 1960; by then, front-engined cars fell out of favor due to lack of competitiveness, as a result, the Scuderia raced the 156 and old racing Ferraris was dispensed of for the price of a brand new car, sometimes scrapped or cannibalized for parts. Why would a Ferrari race mechanic need to service a car that was not of use to them unless he is stripping the car for parts, which he does not appear to be.
  • A #66 Porsche 904, can be seen taking part in the 1966 race when in fact it did not show up in the race.
  • A Lockheed L-1011 TriStar can be seen in the background. It was not introduced until April 26, 1972 with Eastern Air Lines being its first customer.
  • During Miles and Shelby's first encounter at Riverside, the Porsche 356 in the background has 4 lug wheels, not 5 lugs in the real car, indicating that it is a replica based on a VW Beetle. This was also the case for Shelby's 356 near the start.
  • In the first race at Riverside; the Washburn Chevrolet #614XP Corvette Sting Ray coupe, driven in real life by Bob Bondurant, features a 427 Big Block hood scoop, not offered on Corvette Sting Rays until 1967. The car was missing its split-rear screen like in the real car and in all C2 Corvettes offered only that year.
  • During Miles first race at Riverside, a Brumos representative advised Shelby against hiring Miles to drive for him. Miles had already signed up to drive for Shelby by then. The Cobra belonged to Shelby.
  • The Riverside race in which Miles and Shelby encountered each other occurred before Ford and Iacocca suggested that they should buy Ferrari. That race occurred in February 1963 whereas the Ford meeting occurred in January 1963.
  • Lee Iacocca, Marketing Manager at Ford, knew Shelby before the GT40 program. He agreed to provide Shelby engines for the the Cobras in 1962. Cobras are clearly already in production and being sold at Shelby's Venice facility when they "meet" in the film.
  • The crash barriers at Daytona are shown to be partially blue with white. The concrete barriers have always been white throughout their entire lifetime.
  • At the early part of the Le Mans race, a #20 Ferrari 330 P3 swerved to avoid two Ferraris involved in a collision, causing to hit a barrier only to be collected by a Porsche 906. The Ferrari (of Michael Parkes and Ludovico Scarfiotti) actually crashed out but at the 9th hour when Scarfiotti collided with Jo Schlesser's Matra, which shortly retired after a collision with another competitor. The other factory Ferrari, the #21 330 P3, did not retire after blowing its engine following a duel with Miles' Ford (one of Shelby's tactics against the fragile Ferraris), it already had a number of mechanical issues (gearbox, spin out, brakes) which led to it to get pulled back into the pits at 08:25 into retirement.
  • When Shelby locks Leo Beebe in the office you can clearly see there is a second door leading out of the office behind Leo which he does not even look for or try to open.
  • There are several instances during race scenes where drivers are seen yelling at each other. While people can generally lip read the assumption/impression given is that the drivers could actually hear each other. This is impossible while traveling at speed is race cars ( at the time they had very little exhaust noise suppression), as the overall noise is exceptionally loud. Even the times Ken Miles is shown talking to himself his own voice would have been drowned out. Beyond that, they are all wearing helmets that cover their ears...
  • In the movie, the public road portions of the Le Mans course depict yellow road surface markings for the center line. French roads typically use only white paint.
  • Several shots depict a speedometer on the dashboard of the Ford GT40. Racing cars of the 1960's did not have speedometers; drivers used the tachometer, which measures the engine's revolutions per minute ("revs"), to figure out how fast they were going.
  • Carroll Shelby attends a meeting in Henry Ford II's office on the "19th floor." The Ford World Headquarters building in Dearborn, MI, only has 12 floors.
  • At about 1:44, Ken Miles passes in front of an ABC TV camera. While it appears to be a contemporary color TV camera with a zoom lens, it's actually a early 1950's black and white RCA TK-11 / 31 with a fancy paint job and a fake zoom lens covering the lens turret.
  • The track announcer at the Le Mans race refers to "an incident on turn six". In actuality, the turns at Le Mans are referred to by name, not number.
  • While it's raining heavily in Le Mans, Miles GT40 is shown with glowing brake discs, something that wouldn't happen in that situation as: 1st, you drive a lot slower in the rain; 2nd, the rain cools down the discs a lot.
  • The cowboy hat that Damon wears throughout the movie has the brim rolled at the sides in parallel; in way that no self-respecting Texan would ever wear it (or any cowboy, for that matter). Shelby rolled his brim in a wedge shape. In many instances, it was rolled almost to a point in front. As seen in the film, the hat looks like it's being worn by a five-year-old or a foreign tourist.
  • It's obvious to spot the Superformance Cobra's filling Shelby's workshop purely as filler, they're the ones running oversized wheels and low profile tyres.
  • When Miles and Shelby are wrestling in the park it shows young trees attached to plant stakes with stretchable PVC tape. The first patent for that tape was filed in 1994.
  • A scene shows the introduction of the Ford 7-liter engine for use in the GT car. As the engine is run on a dyno stand, it jumps and bounces as if it is loose and misfiring. In reality, balanced racing engines are sturdily mounted for dyno testing and they run smooth at any speed above idle. An engine being revved and demonstrated for a racing team would be still and running smooth instead of jumping about.
  • The GT40 being driven in Le Mans is right hand drive but the gear changes that are shown were filming a left hand drive car.
  • There is a city transit bus with two doors shown painted with Greyhound livery. Greyhound operates (and operated at the time) only inter-city buses with one door.
  • "Daytona" in the movie is not Daytona. The filming location was Autoclub Speedway in California, which accounts for the major differences in the track's size and infield layout.
  • In the diner scene where Shelby is trying to convince Miles to come drive for him, the positions of Miles' hands change between the shots looking over the shoulders of each character.
  • Miles is shown at the end of the Mulsanne Straight braking somewhat, then taking the sharp right turn quite easily. This is outrageous. The Mulsanne Straight is famous; over 2 miles long, lined with tall poplar trees right next to the road on both sides. Speeds well over 200 mph are reached here. It is followed by a very sharp right turn, which is (typically) taken about 35 mph. There is no way he could take it as fast as he appears to be going.
  • The TWA ticket envelope pictures a Lockheed Constellation propliner. TWA was all-jet since 1963. Their ticket envelopes would have shown a Boeing 707 jetliner.
  • Ken Miles' son is seen in the film wearing a soccer shirt for the English team, Aston Villa which fits with the origination of the family from the Midlands area. Replica shirts were not invented and sold until the 1970s. It could have been a real club player's shirt but would have been much bigger.
  • Early in the Le Mans race, Ferrari #20 swerves to avoid a crash and spins out. A medium length shot then shows the horrified driver getting T-boned on its right side by another car. The camera then pulls back in a long shot and the right side of the Ferrari is now undamaged.

Spoilers

  • The car with which Miles crashes fatally is depicted as a Ford GT40 Mk II, instead of the aerodynamically differently shaped Ford J-Car. The actual crash didn't happen in a turn, but at the end of a long straight. The J-Car design evolved into the Ford GT40 Mk IV, which is also wrongly depicted as having a shape resembling the GT40 much more than it did in real life.
  • The end credit claims the GT40 was the only American built car to win Le Mans, a fact widely claimed by enthusiasts, when in fact, only the 1967 winner, the Mk IV, was built in the United States whereas all others was built in Slough, England.
  • In the final confrontation between Miles and Bandini, the two cars are level pegging when Bandini takes his car to 9000 RPM and blows out his engine. In an exterior three quarter view, a puff of smoke is shown and his car immediately begins to drop back. The angle changes to a lateral view of Bandini from inside his car with Miles in the background. The two cars are once again even and Bandini's car drops back a second time.
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