Cool Hand Luke Movie Poster

Trivia for Cool Hand Luke

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  • Jack Lemmon was the owner of Jalem Productions, which co-produced many of his films, as well as this one.
  • Luke's prison number (37) is a reference to the Bible, Luke 1:37. ("For with God nothing shall be impossible.")
  • Film debut of Anthony Zerbe.
  • While passing by the prison camp set, a San Joaquin County building inspector thought it was a recently constructed migrant workers' complex, and posted "condemned" notices on the buildings for not being up to code.
  • Truckloads of Spanish moss were shipped from Louisiana to the set in California to hang in the trees around the prison.
  • The music cue where Luke gets the men to work faster on the road was used later for many years by many ABC television stations as their "Eyewitness News" theme.
  • The lines "What we've got here is failure to communicate. Some men you just can't reach. So you get what we had here last week, which is the way he wants it, well, he gets it. I don't like it any more than you men" can be heard in the introduction of the song "Civil War" by Guns N' Roses. They would use audio of the first line again during the song "Madagascar" on the 2008 album "Chinese Democracy".
  • The line "What we've got here is failure to communicate" was voted as the number eleven movie quote by the American Film Institute. When Frank Pierson wrote that dialogue to be delivered by an uneducated, redneck prison guard, he worried that people wouldn't find it authentic. So he wrote a biography of the guard, explaining that in order to advance to a higher grade in the system, he had been required to take criminology courses, thus exposing him to the kind of academic vocabulary that would justify him using the "communicate" phrase. But as it turned out, no one questioned the line, nor needed to read the fictional account.
  • Bette Davis was first offered the role of Luke's mother, but refused the bit part.
  • In the "road-tarring" sequence, the actors actually blacktopped a mile-long stretch of highway for the county.
  • A Southern prison camp was built for this movie just north of Stockton, California. A dozen buildings were constructed, including a barracks, mess hall, warden's quarters, guard shack, and dog kennels.
  • The opening scene, in which Luke (Paul Newman) is cutting off the heads of parking meters, was filmed in Lodi, California. After the filming, the city did not replace the meters, and for many years afterward, you could go there and see a block-long row of metal posts sans meters.
  • According to Jack Lemmon's son Chris Lemmon in an Icons Radio Interview, Jack was originally selected to play the part of Luke, but after reading the script, saw that Paul Newman would be better. So he decided to produce it instead.
  • (Cameo) Donn Pearce: As a convict named "Sailor". Pearce wrote the novel on which the movie was based, after spending two years on a chain gang for safecracking.
  • Although she played his mother in the film, Jo Van Fleet was only eleven years older than Paul Newman.
  • Morgan Woodward (Boss Godfrey (The Man With No Eyes)) remained in character during breaks between scenes. He would sit in his chair, still wearing his mirrored sunglasses, and not speak to anyone.
  • When the famous line "What we've got here is a failure to communicate" is originally spoken by the Captain (Strother Martin), he omits the "a"; but when Luke (Paul Newman) repeats the line at the end while in the church, he says "a failure to communicate." Thus, the line can be quoted correctly with or without the "a".
  • Luke is seen as sort of a savior by the other convicts, as he gives them hope. After the egg-eating contest, he is laid out on the table in a posture resembling the Crucifixion.
  • Reportedly, Telly Savalas was originally considered for the role of either Luke or Dragline. However, he was in Europe filming The Dirty Dozen (1967), and refused to fly back.
  • A version of the song "Plastic Jesus" sung by Luke after learning that his mother died was used by radio personality Don Imus as the theme song to his Dr. Billy Soul Hargis character while broadcasting from New York City in the 1970s.
  • Luke's legendary consumption of fifty eggs was repeated on a Jackass (2000) episode in 2001.
  • Originally set to be filmed in Florida, at the last minute, Warner Brothers vetoed that decision due to budgetary concerns, and insisted that the film be made in California.
  • Stuart Rosenberg viewed the character of Luke as an avatar for Jesus Christ. The film is packed full of Christian imagery as a consequence.
  • The scene where Luke is visited by his mother needed to be filmed in one day. Given that the scene was eight dialogue filled pages long, that was quite a tall order. However, because the cast members involved, Paul Newman and Jo Van Fleet, were stage-trained professionals, it went off without a hitch.
  • In later years, Composer Lalo Schifrin would often be asked why he used the theme for Eyewitness News (1968) in the film. Schifrin would then rather bemusedly explain that he composed the music for the film, and Eyewitness News (1968) adopted it.
  • Although he loved the look of Morgan Woodward as the intimidating Boss Godfrey, Director Stuart Rosenberg felt that his voice didn't match up with his appearance. So Woodward had almost all of his dialogue stripped out, helping to establish his character as one of the more memorable ones that appeared in the film. His only line was " Luke, fetch the rifle." just before shooting the turtle.
  • Originally, the scene where Luke plays "Plastic Jesus" as an ode to his mother was scheduled for the beginning of the shoot, but after Paul Newman insisted on learning the instrument, Director Stuart Rosenberg delayed it a few weeks. When they tried it, and the playing was unsatisfactory, it was bumped until the next-to-last day of production. Newman and Rosenberg had a shouting match after Newman still couldn't get it down. In what George Kennedy remembered as a "tense, electrically charged, quiet" place, Newman tried again. When he finished, Rosenberg called "Print". Newman insisted he could do better. "Nobody could do it better", Rosenberg replied.
  • The first of four collaborations between Director Stuart Rosenberg and Paul Newman.
  • Stuart Rosenberg was able to set up the film with the assistance of Felicia Farr and her husband, Jack Lemmon. Lemmon had a deal with Columbia Pictures, and was anxious to produce a film, in which he did not star.
  • One of Paul Newman's instructions to writers Donn Pearce and Frank Pierson was that they did not tailor the script for him. He wanted a part that would really stretch him, and not just play to his strengths.
  • Two hundred hard-boiled eggs were provided for one of the film's most famous sequences. Due to clever editing, Paul Newman only ate about eight altogether. The rest were consumed by the cast and crew, which led to extreme cases of flatulence the next day.
  • No less than three cast members appeared in the James Bond film franchise: Joe Don Baker (The Living Daylights (1987), GoldenEye (1995), and Tomorrow Never Dies (1997)), Anthony Zerbe (Licence to Kill (1989)), and Clifton James (Live and Let Die (1973) and The Man with the Golden Gun (1974)).
  • Joy Harmon (The Girl) has said that she almost turned down her now much-celebrated role in the car wash scene, not because of any discomfort over the sexual nature of the scene, but because the filmmakers wanted her to smoke marijuana before the shoot began, apparently thinking it would put her in the proper mindset. When she voiced her objections, they dropped the request, and she did the scene "unstoned".
  • Guns N' Roses sampled the famous "What we have here is failure to communicate" speech for their song "Civil War" on their 1991 "Use Your Illusion II" album.
  • Included among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", edited by Steven Schneider.
  • Aldo Ray auditioned for the role of Dragline.
  • George Kennedy and Richard Davalos died only nine days apart: Kennedy on February 28, 2016 and Davalos on March 8, 2016.
  • Paul Newman's brother, Arthur S. Newman, Jr. was a Production Manager.
  • Paul Newman asked to play the leading role after hearing about the project. In order to develop his character, he travelled to West Virginia, where he recorded local accents and surveyed people's behavior.
  • During the Oscar nomination process, George Kennedy was worried about the box-office success of Camelot (1967) and Bonnie and Clyde (1967), so he invested five thousand dollars in trade advertising to promote himself. Kennedy later stated that thanks to the award his salary was, "multiplied by ten the minute I won", also adding, "the happiest part was that I didn't have to play only villains anymore."
  • Morgan Woodward described his character as a "walking Mephistopheles".
  • Blonde Joy Harmon was cast for the scene where she teases the prisoners in washing her car after her manager contacted the producers. She auditioned in front of Stuart Rosenberg and Paul Newman wearing a bikini, without speaking.
  • The scene in which Luke was chased by bloodhounds, and other exteriors, were shot in Jacksonville, Florida, at Callahan Road Prison. Luke was played by a stuntman, using dogs from the Florida Department of Corrections.
  • Stuart Rosenberg wanted the cast to internalize life on a chain gang, and banned the presence of wives on-set.
  • After Joy Harmon arrived on-location, she remained for two days in her hotel room and wasn't seen by the rest of the cast until shooting commenced. Despite Stuart Rosenberg's intentions, the scene was ultimately filmed separately. He instructed an unaware Harmon of the different movements and expressions he wanted. Originally planned to be shot in half a day, her scene took three. To film the other angle of the scene, featuring the chain gang, Rosenberg substituted a teenage cheerleader, who wore an overcoat.
  • Jo Van Fleet and Richard Davalos made their feature film debuts in East of Eden (1955). Davalos beat out Paul Newman for the role of Aron Trask.
  • Cool Hand Luke's is the name of a chain of steakhouses in California and Idaho with a Western theme (hungry buckaroo) that has nothing to do with this movie.
  • A gun shop in Buckport, Maine is called Cool Hand Luke's Firearms.
  • At Dennis Hopper's invitation, avant-garde filmmaker Bruce Conner shot some footage of the cast clearing brush from the roadside under a blistering, hot sun. The resulting film, Luke (1967), captured on 8mm and edited entirely in camera, is a haunting slow-motion study of how a film is made, with an electronic score by Patrick Gleeson.
  • Paul Newman said to a visitor to the film's set, "There's a good smell about this. We're gonna have a good picture."
  • In a 1989 interview with the "Miami Herald", Author Donn Pearce said, "I seem to be the only guy in the United States who doesn't like the movie. Everyone had a whack at it. They screwed it up ninety-nine different ways." For one thing, Pearce thought Paul Newman was "too scrawny" and completely wrong for the part.
  • The uncredited role of the Sheriff was played by Rance Howard, father of Ron and Clint Howard.
  • Paul Newman enjoyed making the film, and when he wasn't needed on-set, often tooled around the Stockton area either in a blue Mercury convertible or on a motorcycle. "I had great fun with that part", he said. "I liked that man."
  • The fight scene between Dragline and Luke took three days to shoot. George Kennedy said they were both completely worn out from fighting and, in Paul Newman's case, from falling onto hard ground for three full days.
  • Harry Dean Stanton (who is listed only as "Dean Stanton" in this movie's opening credits) taught Paul Newman how to play "Plastic Jesus".
  • After Luke finished eating the fifty eggs, Dynamite (Buck Kartalian) laid his big spoon on the table next to his head, thus quietly knighting the new champion hog-gut.
  • Luke is given a full plate of rice for dinner, an amount that would be impossible for him to eat by himself after not eating for four days. The other inmates take spoonfuls of his food so that he doesn't break the rule: "You gotta clean your plate or go back in the box."
  • The film is included on Roger Ebert's "Great Movies" list.
  • At least five cast members appeared on the Western TV series Cimarron Strip (1967), including Morgan Woodward, who worked the show on at least three separate occasions.
  • For her single day of shooting, Jo Van Fleet sat on a tree stump, two hundred yards from everyone else, looking over her lines. Harry Dean Stanton recalled that she asked him to sing to her before her take, and it made her cry.
  • Director of Photography Conrad L. Hall said the studio drove him "insane", and that his filming techniques were repeatedly questioned. Eventually, it was explained to him that he wasn't showcasing Paul Newman's famous blue eyes enough. He had to shoot a scene four times before he was judged to have shot Newman "correctly".
  • When Joy Harmon filmed the scene in which the men watch her wash her car, she had no idea how suggestive it was. It never occurred to her until she saw it in the theater. "I just figured it was washing the car. I've always been naive and innocent", she said. "I was acting and not trying to be sexy. Maybe that's why the scene played so well. After seeing it at the premiere, I was a bit embarrassed."
  • According to George Kennedy, after filming the boiled egg scene, Stuart Rosenberg yelled "Cut" and Paul Newman vomited into a garbage can.
  • On the pilot of Cheers (1982), the regulars are arguing over what was the sweatiest movie ever made. Ultimately, they agreed on this film.
  • Luke Askew was the very cool hippy in the film Easy Rider.
  • Included among the American Film Institute's 1998 list of the 400 movies nominated for the Top 100 Greatest American Movies.
  • Film debut of Ralph Waite.
  • Film debut of James Gammon.
  • Film debut of Robert Drivas.
  • Dennis Hopper, Luke Askew, and Warren Finnerty appeared in Easy Rider (1969). Hopper also directed.
  • Paul Newman's Best Actor Oscar nominated performance was the only one in the category not in a Best Picture nominee that year.
  • George Kennedy's Oscar winning performance is his only Academy Award nomination.
  • According to George Kennedy, the footage of actress Joy Harmon (the voluptuous blonde who teases the chain gang prisoners by washing her car) was filmed separately. Instead, director Stuart Rosenberg had an unpaid 15-year-old school girl wearing a large overcoat mime the scene, forcing the actors to use their imaginations as they "ogled her" on camera.
  • In an interview aired on TCM, George Kennedy discussed how Joy Harmon's iconic car washing scene was originally scheduled for half a day, and how that shoot ended up taking 3 days. Kennedy laughed and said "Somewhere...there's 80,000 feet of film with Joy Harmon washing that car!"
  • The car receiving the famous wash is a 1941 DeSoto coupe.
  • The film is set in the early 1950s. The war, occasionally referred to, is the Korean War. Lukes self destruction stems from unknown events from events in the war.
  • With the death of Morgan Woodward in February 2019, Lou Antonio was the sole surviving cast member from the top 20 actors credited in this film.
  • Paul Newman would appear with Strother Martin in three other films together, Slap Shot (1977), Harper (1966) and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969).
  • Paul Newman accepted to make the movie after reading the novel which it is inspired from, not the script.
  • Jo Van Fleet, playing negligent Newman's character's mother, had also a similar role in Elia Kazan's East Of Eden. Richard Davalos, who beat Newman out for a role in the Kazan's film, also appears as an inmate in Cool Hand Luke.
  • Ralph Waite, Robert Donner, James Gammon, Rance Howard, and Morgan Woodward all went on to play recurring characters on The Waltons (1971). Charles Tyner appeared just once in The Fawn (1973).
  • Paul Newman and Strother Martin would both appear in Slap Shot (1977).

Spoilers

  • Just before Luke (Paul Newman) is brought back from one of his escape attempts, Dragline (George Kennedy) lets Koko (Lou Antonio) look at the picture of Luke that he hides in the magazine. As Koko opens the magazine, clearly visible on the opposite page is an article titled "The Illusion That Kills", with an image of a hunter firing a rifle, which is pointed directly at Luke's chest. This is a reference to "The Man With No Eyes".
  • Columbia Pictures passed on making the film, having just lost a lot of money on the prison movie, King Rat (1965), that few people went to see. They were also not keen on the fact that the lead character dies at the end.
  • When Stuart Rosenberg shot the convicts in the ditch watching Lucille, he used a stand-in for Joy Harmon: an overcoat-wearing fifteen-year-old girl. Despite the coat, George Kennedy remembered her teeth were chattering from the cold weather. He also wrote, "Those guys shivering in a ditch did some great acting."
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