American Psycho Movie Poster

Trivia for American Psycho

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  • A sign reading "This is not an exit" is shown in the closing scene. These are the last words of the novel.
  • All of the business cards read "Vice President".
  • The first porn movie Bateman is watching is White Angel (1998). The second is Red Vibe Diaries: Object of Desire (1997).
  • The movie appearing on Bateman's television while he's working out at home is The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974).
  • The two large lithographs (posters) in Bateman's apartment are part of a series called "Men in the Cities" by Robert Longo.
  • In the DVD commentary, co-writer and director Mary Harron says that during the first shower scene with Patrick Bateman, all of the women on-set gathered around to watch Christian Bale wash himself.
  • Bateman excuses himself from a conversation by claiming he has an appointment with "Cliff Huxtable". This was Bill Cosby's character's name on The Cosby Show (1984).
  • The year in which the film is set can also be told from Ronald Reagan's speech in the final scene, which he gave on March 4 1987.
  • The scene in which Patrick (Christian Bale) and Courtney (Samantha Mathis) are in bed (when she asks him if he'll call her before Easter) is taken from Bret Easton Ellis' first novel, "Less Than Zero". The conversation between Clay and Blair in that novel is almost identical to the one in the film (Easter has been substituted for Christmas). Although in the book, "American Psycho", Courtney (while lying in bed) does ask Patrick if he will call her before Thanksgiving.
  • After the novel was originally optioned in 1991, author Bret Easton Ellis himself was set to write the script for director Stuart Gordon with Johnny Depp starring as Patrick Bateman. Gordon wanted to do the film in black and white, and stick as close to the book as possible, meaning a guaranteed X-rating. After the project fell through, David Cronenberg replaced Gordon, with Brad Pitt set to star. This project also failed to get off the ground.
  • Guinevere Turner, who played Patrick's friend "Elizabeth" (in the scene with Christie the call girl), also wrote the film's screenplay.
  • Patrick Bateman works at the same firm as Sherman McCoy in The Bonfire of the Vanities (1990): Pierce and Pierce.
  • In the scene with the prostitute Christie (Cara Seymour), Bateman's friend mentions their mutual acquaintance "Alison Poole". Alison Poole is the narrator and main character of the novel "Story of My Life" by Jay McInerney, a contemporaneous peer author to Bret Easton Ellis.
  • To block the three-way sex scene with two prostitutes, co-writer and director Mary Harron and Christian Bale watched x-rated tapes. In her commentary, Harron says Bale made stick-figure drawings of the positions he thought would work best.
  • When Lionsgate picked up the rights for the film, Mary Harron was set to write and direct. Initially, she considered various actors for the role of Patrick Bateman, including Billy Crudup (who was offered the part but turned it down), Ben Chaplin, Robert Sean Leonard, Johnathon Schaech, Jonny Lee Miller, and Jared Leto. Eventually, Harron offered the part to Christian Bale, who accepted. The producers tried to talk Harron into casting Edward Norton, but she refused, and was ultimately allowed to cast Bale, but only on the proviso that she cast at least two other big name actors in supporting roles. To this end, Harron hired Willem Dafoe to play Kimball and Reese Witherspoon to play Evelyn. However, after they had agreed to appear, Lions Gate told Harron they were going to make an offer to Leonardo DiCaprio to play Bateman. Harron told them if they did, she would leave the project, which is exactly what happened. Oliver Stone was subsequently hired to replace Harron, working from a script by Matt Markwalder. Stone was set to cast James Woods as Kimball, Cameron Diaz as Evelyn, Elizabeth Berkley as Courtney and Chloë Sevigny as Jean. Stone also decided to keep Leto on the project as Paul Allen. However, DiCaprio left the project to shoot The Beach (2000) instead, and as the budget began to get out of control, Stone also left, prompting Lionsgate to rehire Harron, who returned to her original castings decisions, and decided to keep Sevigny on the project.
  • Christian Bale and Willem Dafoe played Jesus in previous films: Bale in Mary, Mother of Jesus (1999) and Dafoe in The Last Temptation of Christ (1988).
  • While the novel "American Psycho" is set in 1989, the film adaptation is set in 1987. This is evidenced by the scene where Patrick is briefly reading Zagat's Survey: 1987. Also, the televised speech by President Ronald Reagan, as shown the final scene of the film, also occurred in 1987 (whereas Reagan had already left the White House by the time the events in the original novel took place).
  • The scene in which Patrick Bateman yells at the Asian woman at the laundromat was filmed at a small cleaners on Jarvis street in Toronto, Ontario. Much of the building scenes (his escape near the finale for example) were filmed in the financial district downtown.
  • The cast and crew viewed Mario Bava's Hatchet for the Honeymoon (1970) prior to filming for inspiration. One of the film's producers, Christian Halsey Solomon, is the son of Brett Halsey, who appeared as the lead of Bava's films Roy Colt & Winchester Jack (1970) and Four Times That Night (1971).
  • At one point, the novel was considered for the possibility of a television show on NBC, starring Kevin Dillon. However due to ownership, the film was eventually made. This was later squeezed into an in-joke on Entourage (2004), starring Kevin Dillon.
  • In the final scene, Patrick Bateman uses the phrase "Rockin' and Rollin' and whatever..." This is a phrase often used by Sean Bateman, Patrick's younger brother, in the book, "The Rules of Attraction", also written by Bret Easton Ellis. Sean also makes a short appearance in the novel, "American Psycho", where he also uses the phrase. The line was originally used by John Travolta as Danny in Grease (1978).
  • Looking for a way to create the character of Patrick Bateman, Christian Bale stumbled onto a Tom Cruise appearance on the Late Show with David Letterman (1993). According to co-writer and director Mary Harron, Bale saw in Cruise "this very intense friendliness with nothing behind the eyes," and Bale subsequently based the character of Bateman on that. Interestingly, Tom Cruise is actually featured in the novel. He lives in the same apartment complex as Bateman, who meets him in an elevator and gets the name of Cocktail (1988) wrong, calling it "Bartender."
  • Despite the fact that this was filmed in Super 35, "Filmed in Panavision" is listed in the end credits.
  • The framed black paintings hanging in Bateman's apartment are part of a series called "Surrogate Paintings" by Allan McCollum.
  • When Leonardo DiCaprio was still attached to the project, feminist activist Gloria Steinem lobbied him not to make the film, as his fan base consisted predominately of young teenage girls, and he could ruin his career. Steinem had spoken out about the novel several times and was against the film version in any incarnation. Her involvement is rendered especially interesting insofar as she would soon become Christian Bale's stepmother (as Steinem and Bale's father were dating at the time that Bale accepted the part). Bale later dismissed rumors that he specifically accepted the role to irk Steinem as unsubstantiated gossip.
  • The film had various problems with designer labels during production. Cerruti agreed to allow Christian Bale to wear their clothes, but not when the character was killing anyone. Rolex agreed that anyone in the film could wear their watches except Bateman (hence the famous line from the book "Don't touch the Rolex" had to be changed to "Don't touch the watch"). Perry Ellis provided underwear at the last minute after Calvin Klein pulled out of the project. Comme des Garçons refused to allow one of their overnight bags to be used to carry a corpse, so Jean Paul Gaultier was used instead.
  • The single biggest cost on the film was purchasing the rights to the various songs used throughout.
  • During the shooting of the film, Christian Bale spoke in an American accent off-set at all times. At the wrap party, when he began to speak in his native English accent, many of the crew thought he was speaking that way as an accent for another film. They had thought he was American throughout the entire shoot.
  • The "whoosh" sounds during the famous business card scene was created by slowing down the sound of a sword being drawn from its sheath.
  • The Huey Lewis & The News song "Hip to Be Square", which appears in the film, was initially on the soundtrack album, but it was removed shortly after release because of a lack of publishing rights. The album was recalled and reissued without the song, although some versions of the initial batch had already sold. Over the years, this incident has developed into the myth that Huey Lewis himself refused to allow the song on the album due to the content of the movie.
  • Bret Easton Ellis was sent several death threats after American Psycho was published.
  • Although Patrick is extremely wealthy, we never actually see him do any work.
  • To gain his buffed-up appearance in the film, Christian Bale would spend several hours a day in the gym and then three hours a day with an on-set trainer.
  • Initially given an NC-17 rating by the MPAA, the cinematic kiss of death due to distribution difficulties. Co-writer and director Mary Harron argued volubly against the rating, but was forced to make some minor trims to receive an R-rating.
  • Christian Bale was warned by many that it would be career suicide for him to play the lead in a film like this. This only made him more eager to take the part. Fortunately for him, the opposite turned out to be true. Bale's role in the movie was considered a breakthrough performance, and enabled him to shift his career from supporting roles to leading man status in the decades to come. This finally culminated in roles in the Batman and Terminator franchises, wide critical acclaim, as well as several movie awards nominations.
  • This was the second time in two years that Lionsgate found itself in trouble with the MPAA over one of their films. They had run afoul of the censors with Dogma (1999) which was deemed to be blasphemous.
  • Shortly before shooting commenced in Toronto, lobbying began by Canadians Concerned About Violence in Entertainment protesting about government support in relation to the film's funding.
  • One of the reasons why Chloë Sevigny was attracted to the project was that she has a brother who also works on Wall Street.
  • During production, Christian Bale followed the morning routine that his character Patrick Bateman describes toward the beginning of the film.
  • The address on the side of Patrick Bateman's prescription bottle was Yogi's Bar, and is now William J. Greenberg, Jr. Desserts.
  • In its initial stages of development, Oliver Stone was set to Executively Produce and Rob Weiss direct. Weiss intended to cast Shannen Doherty as Evelyn Williams.
  • In the novel, Elizabeth (Guinevere Turner) gives Patrick Bateman (Christian Bale) the nickname "Batman" (the result of removing the letter "E" from his surname). Bale later played Batman in Batman Begins (2005), The Dark Knight (2008) and The Dark Knight Rises (2012).
  • In the business card scene where Paul Allen mistakes Bateman for being Marcus Halberstram, all three of them wear the same (Oliver People) glasses.
  • Ewan McGregor was subsequently offered the role of Patrick Bateman, but declined after Christian Bale personally urged him to do so.
  • Christian Bale used Nicolas Cage's performance in Vampire's Kiss (1988) as inspiration for Patrick Bateman, as the two characters are strikingly similar.
  • Drew Barrymore and Liv Tyler were originally sought to play some of the female roles.
  • Christian Bale and Samantha Mathis appeared in Little Women (1994).
  • Christian Bale had to gain muscle and mass to reach his one hundred eighty pound (eighty-two kilograms) goal of playing Patrick Bateman.
  • This is the first film of where Christian Bale started his run on different physiques and body transformations. Others include Reign of Fire (2002), The Machinist (2004), Batman Begins (2005), Rescue Dawn (2006), The Dark Knight (2008), The Fighter (2010), The Dark Knight Rises (2012), and American Hustle (2013).
  • Bret Easton Ellis' novel featured a lot more disturbing and violent scenes which were not included in the movie.
  • The name Bateman is derived from the main character of the "Psycho" film franchise, Norman Bates.
  • The business cards belonging to Patrick Bateman, David Van Patten, Timothy Bryce, and Paul Allen each contain the same typo. On the top right, underneath where the company name "Pierce & Pierce" is listed, the department is written as "Mergers and Aquisitions" rather than "Mergers and Acquisitions".
  • The vast majority of the dialogue in the movie is taken word-for-word from the novel by Bret Easton Ellis.
  • Reese Witherspoon played a character named "Elle Woods", that has the same features like Evelyn in this movie, in Legally Blonde (2001), Legally Blonde 2: Red, White & Blonde (2003), and Legally Blonde 3 (2020).
  • Whitney Houston refused to allow any of her songs to be used in the film.
  • This film and Memento (2000) uses the song "Something in the Air" by David Bowie during the end credits. Christian Bale worked with Memento (2000) director Christopher Nolan in The Dark Knight Trilogy and The Prestige (2006). Bowie also appeared in The Prestige (2006) under Nolan's direction.
  • In the early 1990s, Bret Easton Ellis wrote a script for David Cronenberg, with Brad Pitt attached to the lead role. Based on Ellis, Cronenberg hated the restaurant and nightclub scenes, and didn't want to shoot the violence. When Ellis basically ignored these requests, a disappointed Cronenberg hired his own writer, and when that didn't work out either, he left the project. Ellis also wrote another pass on the script for Producer Rob Weiss in 1995 before co-Writer and Director Mary Harron (and Oliver Stone at some point) came aboard.
  • Josh Lucas and Reese Witherspoon appeared in Sweet Home Alabama (2002).
  • Jared Leto plays Paul Allen. This is the second time he's played "Paul", the first being Urban Legend (1998).
  • Certain scenes in the book either had to be completely removed or toned down for the film, due to the graphic and extreme nature of the murders and torture scenes.
  • Reese Witherspoon would later present Christian Bale with his first Academy Award in 2011 for his role in The Fighter (2010).
  • Some media jokingly described the film as "an adaptation of a novel written by a misogynist (Bret Easton Ellis) directed by a feminist (Mary Harron)".
  • Co-writer and director Mary Harron and star Christian Bale have a connection with Batman. Harron once directed a Batman special for the BBC series The Late Show (1988), which showed the character's evolution from comic book to feature film. Bale is perhaps best known for playing Batman in The Dark Knight trilogy.
  • The film cast includes three Oscar winners: Christian Bale, Jared Leto and Reese Witherspoon; and two Oscar nominees: Willem Dafoe and Chloë Sevigny.
  • During the iconic business card scene, upon closer inspection, the word "Acquisitions" is misspelled as "Aquisitions" on Patrick Bateman's, David Van Patten's, Timothy Bryce's, and Paul Allen's business cards. Likewise, the word is misspelled on Luis Carruthers' card as shown in a later scene. It's noted to be either a production mistake or to subtly show how shallow Bateman and his associates are in not noticing an important word that's misspelled on their business cards.
  • The dinner scene in the restaurant with Patrick Bateman, Timothy Bryce, Evelyn, Courtney, Luis Carruthers, Vanden, and Stash is somewhat different in the novel. While the scene in the film takes place in a fancy restaurant, in the novel, the scene takes place at the beginning of the novel which shows Bateman and Price, named Bryce in this film, arriving at Evelyn's home. In the film, Patrick and Evelyn are the ones who arrived at dinner, as opposed to Patrick and Timothy in the novel, and Luis Carruthers isn't in the scene in the novel.
  • In Dexter (2006), Dexter Morgan uses Patrick Bateman's name as an alias to obtain M-99 to incapacitate his victims. Both characters notably share some similarities in terms of each being serial killers who lead double lives.
  • Christian Bale extensively studied the "American Psycho" novel and the character of Patrick Bateman in order to get the feel of the character right. He'd distanced himself from others while on-set in order to create a mysterious, unsettling vibe for Bateman.
  • Author Bret Easton Ellis based the character of Patrick Bateman off of his own father.
  • Patrick suggests to Elizabeth to have sex with Christy, to which Elizabeth scoffs at the suggestion, asking why he'd think she'd be into lesbianism. Patrick responded that she went to Sarah Lawrence College. In real life, Guinevere Turner, who portrays Elizabeth and is also one of the writers of the film, went to Sarah Lawrence College, and is a lesbian.
  • Bateman! Drop the E and you get "Batman."
  • Justin Theroux wore blue eye contacts to play Timothy Bryce.
  • Christian Bale underwent extensive dental work in order to play the character of Patrick Bateman. It is unclear whether or not this was a personal choice or whether he was instructed to do so by the director.
  • There has been and still is an ongoing debate on whether this film is a drama, thriller, or horror film. Some would even argue that the film is more of a black comedy. Likely, this film is more of a cross-genre type of film in which it's contained with more than just one particular genre that defines it.
  • In the Novel, Patrick is referred to as "Batman" by Francesca, who is an acquaintance. Christian Bale portrays Patrick Bateman in the film version of American Psycho and Batman in Christopher Nolan's Dark knight trilogy.
  • In the novel, Patrick Bateman is a way more misogynistic, racist, sexist, homophobic, and xenophobic character. These characteristics were overall heavily toned down in the film in order to make his character more tolerable, even though some of those characteristics were still subtly present.
  • In the novel, Patrick Bateman's most common weapons of choices are an axe, nail gun, chainsaw, mace, acid, knives, and guns.
  • Producer Edward R. Pressman first purchased the rights to Bret Easton Ellis' novel in 1992, a year after it was published.
  • Johnny Depp expressed an interest in playing the lead role.
  • Leonardo DiCaprio was asking $21 million to play the lead, forcing the film's budget up to $40 million. When he quit, and Christian Bale resumed the role, the budget went back down to a more reasonable $7 million. With a box office take in excess of $34 million, the film proved successful.
  • Having such faith in the film, Christian Bale turned down other film offers and auditions for nine months in the hope of winning back the part of Patrick Bateman. His waiting ultimately paid off.
  • As part of the marketing campaign, emails were sent out purportedly from Patrick Bateman. Christian Bale was not keen on this approach.
  • Christian Bale's moonwalk with an ax, when he's about to murder one of his work colleagues, was improvised.
  • Keanu Reeves was offered the lead role.
  • Director Mary Harron was pregnant during the making of the film.
  • After the film was completed and - by extension - his punishing gym and healthy lifestyle, Christian Bale admitted to co-writer Guinevere Turner that he was "so fucking sick of having to eat chicken breasts".
  • Production designer Gideon Ponte used to be an art dealer in New York City so had a very strong idea of what kind of artwork should be populating Patrick Bateman's apartment.
  • The inspiration for Patrick's girlfriend Evelyn to carry a Vietnamese pot-belly pig at a Christmas party was an interview that Mary Harron and Guinevere Turner saw on late night TV with Belinda Carlisle in which she was waxing lyrical about the joys of such a pet.
  • For Willem Dafoe's scenes, Mary Harron instructed him to play each one in three different styles - one as if he is suspicious of Patrick Bateman, two as if he has no clue as to Bateman's guilt and three as if he is undecided.
  • The prostitute Christy that Bateman picks up in the Meat-Packing District was written specially for Cara Seymour, a friend of director Mary Harron.
  • The head that appears in Patrick Bateman's refrigerator was achieved by the actress in question sticking her head up through the fridge's shelves.
  • Christian Bale's frenzied confession to his lawyer down the phone that he's a serial killer was filmed in 14 takes. Director Mary Harron kept pressing Bale to do another take as he improved with each one. Bale was fueled regularly by cappuccinos during all this.
  • Rather fortunately, at the beginning of the film, when Christian Bale pulls off his silicon mask, it came off in one go in the first take. Mary Harron had previously agonized over this scene, worrying that the mask would break up when it's being pulled off.
  • During his big chainsaw scene, Christian Bale would happily (literally) hang out between takes wearing nothing but a sock over his penis and some tennis shoes.
  • Reese Witherspoon was three months pregnant when she made this film.
  • This is one of the two Christian Bale films released in 2000. The other film is Shaft (2000).
  • This is in many ways an American version of Clockwork Orange. Clockwork Orange; with it's startling, amoral view of a psychopath; who is a reflection of and a bi-product of the horrific society around him; bears more than a passing resemblance to "American Psycho", another portrait of a psychopath set against a twisted society. Both are self-described satires; both were banned; CLockwork the movie was banned in Britain for 20 years and American Psycho the book was also banned in certain markets when it came out in 1991. Both also bring in very dark black comedy elements to accentuate the commentary; and both showcase horrific violations of women. But whereas Alex is just a thug, and Patrick is an all out serial killer; Alex's misadventures are set in a future dystopian Britain; and Patrick's story is a nostalgia piece; set in the 1980s, in America.
  • In the film, Patrick Bateman is seen smoking a cigar only once. In the novel, he is described as constantly smoking cigars.
  • Though this didn't happen in the novel, it's noted that in the film, Patrick Bateman talks in great detail about his favorite musicians to his victims before he carries out his murderous attacks onto them. People have stated that they find this element very scary about the character because it not only shows how shallow and pretentious he is. It also shows how obsessive and unpredictable Bateman is.

Spoilers

  • The events that Bateman mentions in the phone message to his lawyer are events that transpired in the book by Bret Easton Ellis, but not in the film.
  • In each scene with Detective Donald Kimball (Willem Dafoe), Mary Harron asked Dafoe to portray his character three different ways: 1) Kimball knew Patrick Bateman killed Paul Allen, 2) Kimball didn't know Bateman killed Allen, and 3) Kimball wasn't sure if Bateman killed Allen. Harron would then edit the takes together, giving the audience an unsure vibe of what Detective Kimball thought of Bateman.
  • Two scenes featured unexpected improvisation by Christian Bale. When Bateman is jumping rope, he starts to skip and cross his jump rope as a schoolgirl would. Bale surprised co-writer and director Mary Harron even more by starting to dance as Bateman was preparing to kill Paul Allen (Jared Leto). That time, she says in interviews and the commentary, she collapsed with laughter.
  • The only parts of the movie that author Bret Easton Ellis didn't like was Bateman's "moonwalk" during Paul Allen's murder-scene and the voice-over, which he felt was "too explicit".
  • When Bateman kills Paul Allen, two GQ Magazines can be seen on the table: August 1987; "The Lusts and Luck of Corbin Bernsen", and June 1987; "Timothy Dalton is the New James Bond".
  • The ending traditionally has two possible explanations. 1. Patrick killed all of the women we see him kill, and the lawyer at the end simply mistakes Paul Allen for some other yuppie, much like Bateman is mistaken for Halberstram, almost like a sick joke. 2. Bateman didn't kill anyone but simply fantasizes it all either in his office by drawing it in his notebook, or in one scene on the paper table cloth while with his fiancee. This is why he claims "this confession has meant nothing", because it didn't happen.
  • This film stars both Christian Bale and Jared Leto who each end up portraying DC characters. Bale would later go on to star as Bruce Wayne/Batman in The Dark Knight Trilogy and Leto would later appear as The Joker in Suicide Squad (2016). Interestingly, Batman has a no killing policy while the Joker kills with no remorse, yet fans humorously point out how in this film, Batman kills the Joker.
  • This is the first movie where Reese Witherspoon cries after getting dumped in a restaurant. The second is Legally Blonde (2001).
  • Patrick Bateman kills a prostitute by throwing a chainsaw down at her while she runs down a spiralling staircase. Christian Bale later had a similar scene in The Dark Knight (2008) when he as the Batman jumps down a spiralling ramp onto a van driven by the Scarecrow.
  • The scene early on in the film in which Evelyn (Reese Witherspoon) asks Patrick (Christian Bale) why he doesn't quit his job seeing as he hates it and Patrick replies, "Because I want to fit in." This line is in the novel, but it's between him and his ex-girlfriend Bethany, who he admits to killing with a nail gun in the phone call with his lawyer.
  • Jared Leto's character is being killed to the Huey Lewis and the News song, "Hip to be Square". In a later interview with his band Thirty Seconds to Mars, he was asked what song do they prefer: Huey Lewis and the News from this movie, or one of Whitney Houston's songs, and of course he said Huey Lewis and the News.
  • The film takes place over the course of several months from late 1986 to early 1987. Scenes that showcase this are the Christmas party scene at Evelyn's home, and the closing scene in which Ronald Reagan's speech was being broadcast on March 4, 1987.
  • Elizabeth (Guinevere Turner) and Kristy's (Cara Seymour) deaths were a lot different in the book than shown in the film, including the way the scene was arranged. In the film, during the threesome sex scene, Kristy flees when she sees Patrick attacking Elizabeth, who dies from possible chainsaw injuries. Kristy dies moments later due to a chainsaw being dropped on her. In the book, it's Elizabeth who flees but is stabbed and slashed to death by a butcher knife. Whereas Kristy is set on fire while battery hooked jumper cables are attached to her breasts which results in her getting electrocuted.
  • When Patrick confesses to the murders over the phone, one of the people he mentions murdering is his ex-girlfriend, Bethany. He says that he killed her with a nail gun. In the book, among other torture methods inflicted upon her, Bethany is graphically brutalized and mutilated by a nail gun before she eventually dies from her injuries, specifically when Patrick uses a saw to cut off one of her arms.
  • The nail gun Bateman is holding to the back of Jeans head is Paslode brand pneumatic nail gun which requires a hose and compressed air to fire and requires the safety fire mechanism to be pushed hard against a surface for the trigger to cock.
  • Some of the murders Patrick confesses over the phone to his lawyer are the murders of a homosexual man and his dog. In the book, he comes across the man and his dog while walking one night. He ends up slashing and gutting the dog. Then, he stabs the petrified owner in the face and head several times. Afterwards, he shoots the man with a silencer to make sure he's dead.
  • Jared Leto's character's name is called "Paul Allen" in the movie, but in the novel, his name is actually "Paul Owen". Bateman kills Owen/Allen with an axe, but unlike in the movie, (where the killing itself is mostly not shown) in the novel, his death is described in an extremely graphic and detailed manner.
  • In the novel, Bateman murders a young boy at a zoo to see if he gets some satisfaction from the event. He went as far as to pretend to be a doctor when the boy's mother found him. It turns out that Bateman didn't get any satisfaction from the murder and was actually disappointed because, in his mind, the child hadn't experienced a full life to where his death would be fulfilling to him (Bateman). This is perhaps the most disturbing and controversial scene of the entire book, and its content would never be filmed due to the callous nature of the main character exhibited to the full extent in this particular scene.
  • The scene where Bateman murders Al the homeless man played out somewhat differently than in the novel. In this film, Bateman simply stabs Al in the stomach several times and stomps his dog to death. In the novel, he graphically stabs Al in the eyes, face, stomach, hands, and genital area many times. While he's doing this, he demeans Al by forcibly removing his trousers, publicly exposing his partially unclothed body, and calling him a racial slur. Then, he'd severely broken Al's dog's legs and leaves the dog to suffer with its fate unclear.
  • In the novel, Patrick had presented Evelyn with a secret urinal cake covered in luxury brand chocolate, in which he and other men have relieved themselves in, presumably as the last gift he gives her before he breaks up with her.
  • In the scene before he murders Paul Allen, Bateman is seen taking a pill out of a prescribed medicine bottle in the bathroom. When he calls Jean and all the while, having a nervous breakdown in public much later in the film, he's seen clutching a similar prescribed medicine bottle and taking the pills. The prescribed medicine is most likely meant for maintaining mental issues. It's heavily implied that Patrick Bateman suffers from a series of notable mental illnesses such as Narcissistic Personality Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Antisocial Personality Disorder, and Schizophrenia. Taking the medicine implies that he's trying to somewhat control his behavior.
  • Though this is briefly touched upon in the movie, in the novel, it's implied that Patrick Bateman's fiancée, Evelyn, is having an affair with his friend, Timothy Price, named Bryce in this film. Early on in the novel, Patrick notices the interactions between the two while they're at her home for dinner, and observes the tension between them. This is evidenced by Evelyn wanting to speak with Timothy before dinner about something that was never made clear to Patrick nor the reader, the two them being gone for a while from the other guests due to an insinuated heated argument as suggested by Patrick, and their surprisingly playful amorous behavior later in her bedroom after dinner.
  • Christian Bale's English accent can be briefly heard during the scene where Bateman confesses to the murders over the phone to his lawyer.
  • Though the scene never happened in the original novel, Jean is the only character who comes to the realization that Patrick Bateman is deranged after his erratic phone call to her and discovering his extremely disturbing and ghastly doodles in his daily planner book. This also shows that Jean is the only character in the entire film that hasn't succumbed to the consumerism and materialism culture that Bateman and those who surround him have and that she recognizes the inner qualities of a person more than the outer qualities.
  • Luis Carruthers, Jean, and the kitten are the only characters that unknowingly escaped Bateman's attempted murderous attacks.
  • When Bateman shoots at the police toward the end of the film, the police cruiser explodes despite only being hit by bullets. Bateman rightfully looks at the gun as if it shouldn't have done that. This is a reference to a 1980s action movie trope where cars just seem to do this, which might be a clue that this scene exists partially in Bateman's mind.
  • There are several deleted scenes that never made it to the final cut of the film. These scenes include: * Patrick trying and failing to seduce Evelyn into sex and having a discussion as to why she doesn't completely go for Timothy Bryce. * Patrick and Courtney having sex but get interrupted due to concerns of not properly practicing safe sex. * Kimball crossing paths with Patrick at a club and having a brief conversation. * Patrick and his friends having a conversation while riding in a limousine. * While at a club, Timothy Bryce is extremely uncomfortable for some unknown reason to where he tells Patrick that he's leaving, jumps over a banister, and runs out of the crowded club as Patrick looks on.
  • Even though the film barely mention it, in the novel, there are quite a few discussions about the AIDS virus and epidemic.
  • Christian Bale, who portrays Patrick Bateman, and Jared Leto, who portrays Paul Allen, would go on to portray Bruce Wayne/Batman and The Joker, respectively. In the famous scene where Bateman kills Allen, it's often said to be not only Bateman taking Allen's life and assuming his identity. But it's also, metaphorically speaking, showing Batman killing The Joker.
  • In the film, Bateman's apartment is clean and polished. In the novel, his apartment gradually becomes filthy and messy due to the various body parts and organs of some of his victims as well a lot of spilled blood. This is one of the main reasons why he frequently used Paul Owen's, named Paul Allen in the film, apartment to continue to bring home more victims.
  • Body Count: 12 (implied to possibly be up to 50 or more)
  • In the novel, Bateman murdering Al the homeless man is a lot more graphic. In the film, he simply stabs Al in the abdomen several times and (offscreen) stomps his dog to death. Whereas in the novel, he stabs Al in the eyes, face, abdomen, and genital area. He pulls down Al's pants to expose the lower part of his body in order to humiliate him while calling him a racial slur. He then stomps and breaks Al's dog's legs and leaves the dog to suffer with its fate unknown.
  • In the novel, Bateman grinds a woman's corpse into hamburgers and eats it. It's during this scene where he acknowledges that what he's doing is morally wrong yet he doesn't care.
  • While the film takes place over the course of several months, the novel takes place over the course of two years.
  • This movie marks the second time Reese Witherspoon plays a character who is broken up with in a restaurant. In "Legally Blonde", her character is expecting to become engaged. In this movie, her character's engagement is called off.
  • Even though there are several implications in the film, in the novel, Patrick Bateman was portrayed as cannibalistic. There were many graphic scenes of Bateman devouring the bodies of his victims, whether cooked or raw.
  • Some people have stated that they felt sorry for Patrick Bateman during his confession scene. It was acknowledged that the character's psyche was deteriorating and the scene was showing the unfortunate result of Bateman not getting help for his psychosis.
  • Patrick Bateman (Christian Bale) spends forty percent of the film either shirtless, in his underwear, or nude.
  • The only scene that Patrick Bateman isn't featured in is the scene where Jean is looking through his daily planner book at the end of the film.
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